Can a teacher do this? - page 8

by Dezy 8,818 Views | 114 Comments

Ok so I had a midterm yesterday. I have been studying for a little over two weeks straight for this example. I would go over the material she has posted online (she likes to do everything on power int) she also just does her... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from loriangel14
    We HAVE been suggesting something. Study it all.Your teacher is not going to "direct" you to all the answers. You need to take responsibilty. The teacher will not direct you to every single word you need to study. The CRNE will be based on all of it.

    Then what good is the teacher? The way most of you put it, the teacher's job is technically carried out if s/he tells their students "Everything in the text is fair game. Make sure you study it all!," and then just stays on "Facebook"..er...I mean "ALLNURSES" all day lol (Just a little joke there. I feel I have to point that out as sometimes I think posters are robots (and may not get it) simply giving advice by echoing what they've heard all their lives, but refuse to think for themselves. And I'm not meaning to insult anyone here, guys/ladies, I swear I'm not. It just upsets me when educated people-NURSES for the love of GOD-just support the status quo whether it is right or wrong).

    I don't care if that is just the way it is, either. If the Academic institution will not force the instructors to do actually do everything in their power to help their students absorb necessary knowledge (you know, like the student is paying for?), then perhaps the powers that be can just drop the "Classroom instruction" classes from the Degree requirements. After all, "It is up to the student to study everything anyway," right? They can replace those classes with more clinicals and special program requirements. Then, the students can save money by not paying for a class with a useless instructor, but still come out ahead due to more specialized training.
    Last edit by PRICHARILLAisMISSED on Nov 25, '12
    gummi bear, newhospicern, and morte like this.
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    Quote from sharpeimom
    All professors are required to have office hours. Use them! If they aren't convenient for you, most faculty will meet you outside those hours and in offbeat places like the student union, classrooms, etc. I know my husbandhas met students all kinds of unusual spots at times that worked for the student. Don't be afraid to ask.
    But Ma,am, the OP says she has tried to speak to her professor during office hours. She was told (paraphrasing) that unless the OP ask a specific question, s/he cannot answer it. Now I ask you, "What kind of bull is that!!?!!" As a student, The OP may not know what specific questions to ask. Is it not the professors responsibility to help her find the correct questions? Or is it ok for her/him to know that their student is having trouble but not lift a finger to help-even after the help is asked for!

    The way you describe your husband, Ma'am, I hope I have someone like him for an instructor when I start taking the tougher classes. If he does for his students what you say he does, I have no doubt that he would be sick to his stomach if anyone ever accused him of pulling the stuff that the OP's instructor is pulling.
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    And in all fairness, if the OP asked "is this a good teacher" we would have said no. That's not what was asked. "Is this fair" and "can they do this" is what was asked. Yes the OP is a pre-req student however posting here leads one to believe he/she is on a nursing path hence the replies.
    elkpark likes this.
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    I actually agree with you that it's a cop out when a teacher doesn't teach. That is their job and what our very expensive tuition pays for. I do agree that instructors can't go in depth on every subject-- but they should be doing a lot more than reading off of the power-point supplied by the text book publisher.

    We had a quiz in an online class that has given no instruction, and the quiz had questions that she must have pulled from thin air since they weren't covered in the book or any of the reading materials given to us. When questioned, the teacher said, "sorry, but we don't spoon feed the information-- it's your responsibility to know this stuff"... WHAT? Well, it's your responsibility to teach-- especially if you want us to know information outside of the assigned reading.
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    Quote from itsnowornever
    And in all fairness, if the OP asked "is this a good teacher" we would have said no. That's not what was asked. "Is this fair" and "can they do this" is what was asked. Yes the OP is a pre-req student however posting here leads one to believe he/she is on a nursing path hence the replies.
    Fair enough. Those were her specific questions. But no one just said "Yes, the teacher can do that," "No it isn't fair." What they are adding is "You're an adult now!" or "It is your responsibility to learn everything." The OP also says that she believes she should get the education she is paying for (you know, clarification and real life personal examples of the text book information), but no one addresses that unless they're telling her to "Get over it. That's just the way it is." And that's weak! Oh, about "You're an adult now," does that mean that you all think that the professor should just do the bare minimum of what is required by the University-which is, apparently, to show their faces in a classroom and click a slide and read it,- but NOT what is needed by the (paying) student?
    Last edit by PRICHARILLAisMISSED on Nov 26, '12
    newhospicern and gummi bear like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from PRICHARILLAisMISSED
    Oh, about "You're an adult now," does that mean that you all think that the professor should just do the bare minimum of what is required by the University-which is, apparently, to show their faces in a classroom and click a slide and read it,- but NOT what is needed by the (paying) student?
    Of course not. I was only addressing the questions posed by the OP. I was also addressing her later comments. I would not want that type of professor either. We have one or two like that in my nursing program. They aren't fun and I have a lot more teaching to do to get myself ready for their portion of our tests. Thankfully, I have other, wonderful professors.

    However, when the OP asked for our opinions on whether her teacher "could" do what she did, we gave her our opinion that, yes, she can. And, in order to get through that class, the OP needs to do more.
  7. 0
    I read only some posts
    You asked for help, so how about using her pp as a guide, and fill in with Beeefier info from book.

    If she goes over lets say cranial nerves and just says names, and one thing about them.
    Look up in book, and add to the pps.

    Good luck, it would of been nice if she said that in class.
  8. 2
    Quote from rubato

    Of course not. I was only addressing the questions posed by the OP. I was also addressing her later comments. I would not want that type of professor either. We have one or two like that in my nursing program. They aren't fun and I have a lot more teaching to do to get myself ready for their portion of our tests. Thankfully, I have other, wonderful professors.

    However, when the OP asked for our opinions on whether her teacher "could" do what she did, we gave her our opinion that, yes, she can. And, in order to get through that class, the OP needs to do more.
    Exactly. The OP cannot do anything about a teacher who doesn't cover all the material in lecture. I cannot do anything about a teacher who doesn't cover everything in lecture. Yes, they CAN do that. What the OP CAN do is adjust. A NS Adcom isn't going to erase a grade brought about by a teacher who didn't give you an excellent educational value for your money. The most important thing to do is to readjust to get what you want out of life.
    nguyency77 and loriangel14 like this.
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    It isn't just about "getting your money's worth" or "they WORK for me, therefore..."

    You are not at Walmart nor are your classes bluelight specials at K Mart.

    You aren't at a Vo-Tech school either. You're in college. Your instructor or professor has the "right" because of something called "academic freedom" to teach using a style and by emphasizing the material he or she feels is the most vital. They really do not have the time to talk in class about EVERY SINGLE SOLITARY thing that will
    or even might be on an exam. For the first twelve years of education, teachers must teach toward performance tests by school board order, but not in college.

    Becoming responsible for much of your own learning is a huge change and can also be scary at times. If your instructor truly will not help you during office hours, go talk to your dept. chair or the dean. If enough students do that, I'll bet you'll see a change.
    nguyency77, BuckyBadgerRN, elkpark, and 2 others like this.
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    however, crappy teachers do exist.


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