A&P not really helpful in nursing school! - page 2

I struggled through A&P 1 with an A and now I am stuggling through A&P 2 with a B. After all of this, a classmate tells me that when she was in LVN school there was no point in the program where she... Read More

  1. by   txspadequeenRN
    I will say that I dont use everything I learned in A&P. Maybe she is talking about identifing the tissues under the microscope or something. I have used everything I learned in A&P at one point or another. Whether it be getting X-ray reports and having to figure out just what bone or depression they are talking about or getting a BX result and jumping up and down because I remember what the heck a Simple Squamous epithilium layer is..whoooo hoo. I even use the information I learned when I dissected the cat. I will never NEVER forget where the latisimus Dorsi ( not spelled right) muscle is... OH my your classmate is just wrong.




    Quote from ganeese
    I struggled through A&P 1 with an A and now I am stuggling through A&P 2 with a B. After all of this, a classmate tells me that when she was in LVN school there was no point in the program where she needed all this A&P info and she hasn't needed it in the last 5 years she has worked as an LVN. She said that she thinks these A&P classes we have to take are BS because the LVN/ADN nurse doesn't utulize this info. She says the basics make starting out as a nurse easier but that nursing in pracitce doesn't involve you needing to know most of this stuff. Like all the different types of tissue. If your a burn nurse yes you will need to know this, but they will teach you all you need to know when your in training.

    Now I feel like I am wasting my time in A&P even though I have to have it.
  2. by   Jessy_RN
    I don't seem to understand why your friend would suggest A&P wasn't helpful?
  3. by   gr8rnpjt
    When I worked nights on tele I worked with an LPN whom I really respected. One night we had a patient who developed incresing dyspnea to the point where it sounded like she was drowning in fluid inside her lungs. My LPN said, "she sounds like she is going into pulmonary edema". I never had heard pulmonary edema, but dang if she wasn't right. We transferred the patient to CCU very quickly and she was placed on a vent. I learned from an LPN that night what pulmonary edema sounded like. I have much respect for her to this day. You bet your life and your patients life, you need to know your A&P!:angel2:
  4. by   stpauligirl
    Quote from ganeese
    I struggled through A&P 1 with an A and now I am stuggling through A&P 2 with a B. After all of this, a classmate tells me that when she was in LVN school there was no point in the program where she needed all this A&P info and she hasn't needed it in the last 5 years she has worked as an LVN. She said that she thinks these A&P classes we have to take are BS because the LVN/ADN nurse doesn't utulize this info. She says the basics make starting out as a nurse easier but that nursing in pracitce doesn't involve you needing to know most of this stuff. Like all the different types of tissue. If your a burn nurse yes you will need to know this, but they will teach you all you need to know when your in training.

    Now I feel like I am wasting my time in A&P even though I have to have it.
    I don't believe that A&P is a waste.....even though I am also currently struggling in it with a very difficult professor....I have never known many things about the human body until these last 13 weeks!!!! Never even heard of "antecubital vein" or that too much alcohol may paralyze the phrenic nerve in the thoracic diaphragm and will cause a person to stop breathing and die ( I am sure that there will be plenty of intoxicated people arriving in the ER which are close to dying) you got to know what is "left" and "right" on the PATIENT and some of my fellow students couldn't seem to get that concept I have learned so much in such a short time and just gave a few examples.......some stuff might be not as important as other stuff but I strongly believe that a good foundation is necessary unless you will only change bedpans and do nothing else as a nurse? Deciphering the docs writtenmumbojumbo will be a challenge in itself, you've got to know what they are talking about.
  5. by   stpauligirl
    Quote from Catys_With_Me
    You're not wasting your time. Trust me. In fact, keep your A&P book because you will be using it as a reference when you're in nursing school. It is by far the one pre-nursing text I have reached for on a regular basis in the last year and a half of nursing school. A&P teaches you normal anatomy and physiology, nursing delves into what goes wrong when you have a disease process. How would you ever be able to understand any of that if you didn't have A&P as a foundation? You need it.
    Thanks for the tip to keep the book, I am also keeping my Biochem book
  6. by   bigmac222
    Sounds like everyone is on the same page with regards to the A& P classes. You will need them as you futher your education..
  7. by   MMARN
    I wonder if your friend was talking about maybe Microbiology or something. The thing is that I just had my nursing program orientation and my program manager told us that A&P was not going to be reviewed. You MUST know the stuff BEFORE you can understand anything. She told us it was a guarantee that we will be using the book. She told us NOT to sell it back, otherwise we would be lost in the program. I'm not sure what your friend was talking about, but my friend, who is in the last year of her program, says that it is IMPERATIVE that you know the anatomy and physiology of the body. I'm sorry, but she's wrong. You're not wasting your time. Stick to what you're doing. You won't regret it. Good luck!
  8. by   jnette
    Must agree with all the above.. A & P is the very FOUNDATION of everything you will utilize in nursing !!! It's an absolute MUST HAVE.

    Wow.:stone
  9. by   stpauligirl
    Quote from jnette
    Must agree with all the above.. A & P is the very FOUNDATION of everything you will utilize in nursing !!! It's an absolute MUST HAVE.

    Wow.:stone
    And our ALL KNOWING supertough professor who expects us to KNOW IT ALL said that there is now one college in our city which requires A&P for Sociology majors.......you've got to know the human body before you can deal with it
  10. by   Tweety
    Quote from jnette
    Must agree with all the above.. A & P is the very FOUNDATION of everything you will utilize in nursing !!! It's an absolute MUST HAVE.

    Wow.:stone

    Yeah that.

    It's the backbone of nursing education imo.
  11. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    I couldn't even imagine anyone saying this!

    Even in medical assisting school we had to have knowledge of basic A&P.

    In nursing school, being more in depth, how could you survive with out knowing A&P in depth?

    I'd hate to get a gluteal IM from that LVN. If you didn't know A&P, you wouldn't know where to give a gluteal shot, and you may hit the sciatic nerve! That is just muscular, and only one example!


    Just as others have said, there's the renal, respiratory, cardiovascular, integumentary.......wow, I'm glad I had to take A&P 1 and 2!

    BTW, You better believe I kept my A&P book!
  12. by   S.N. Visit
    Quote from ganeese
    I struggled through A&P 1 with an A and now I am stuggling through A&P 2 with a B. After all of this, a classmate tells me that when she was in LVN school there was no point in the program where she needed all this A&P info and she hasn't needed it in the last 5 years she has worked as an LVN. She said that she thinks these A&P classes we have to take are BS because the LVN/ADN nurse doesn't utulize this info. She says the basics make starting out as a nurse easier but that nursing in pracitce doesn't involve you needing to know most of this stuff. Like all the different types of tissue. If your a burn nurse yes you will need to know this, but they will teach you all you need to know when your in training.

    Now I feel like I am wasting my time in A&P even though I have to have it.

    :stoneface: Either you misunderstood her or she misunderstood you. If the nurse doesn't use anatomy & physiology in her assessments & interventions, what does the nurse use?
  13. by   purplemania
    Try reading some charts and you will quickly see who knows anatomy. Depending on the kind of nursing you will be practicing, you will need to know anatomy. For instance, what veins are you accessing for the IV? Describe the pressure ulcer. Describe which digit is affected by trauma. What is missing on your patient? Without proper knowledge you will look like an idiot and may have a tough time explaining yourself in court should the occasion arise. Lawyers (for the other side) love it if you don't know one vein from another). IMHO knowledge is only wasted on people who refuse to use it.

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