Black - The New White For Nurses? - page 4

by JerseyBSN 9,049 Views | 46 Comments

The facility where I work went over to all black scrubs for nurses in March of 2011. We were all shocked! Patients even asked if we were in mourning for the first few months. I had a procedure at another facility this week... Read More


  1. 0
    I like all white. I think that when nurses wore the traditional white uniforms, they looked very professional.
  2. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** I took it for granted that nurses would wear scrubs. That the hospital has so littte reguard for nursing that they would tell each nurse what they must wear, in much the same manner I used to pick out clothes and colors for my 3 year old is indicative of administrations opinion of nurses. I hope someone answers my question about what color scrubs the physicians are required to wear at these same hospitals.
    not sure about scrub requirements but all of the residents of any service that wear scrubs wear a light blue. all of them never saw one in scrubs in a different color.
  3. 0
    Quote from anotherone
    not sure about scrub requirements but all of the residents of any service that wear scrubs wear a light blue. all of them never saw one in scrubs in a different color.
    *** Does the hospital require them to wear those scrubs?
  4. 1
    Black is slimming so I guess we can all gain another 5lbs without anyone noticing,......."chocolate anyone? "

    I am sure the pts will be disappointed as nothing inspires confidence or screams professionalism than nice neon thongs or flowered undies beneath the paper thin white scubs.

    Ahhhh...the end of an era of the nurse with theflower power!!!
    Meriwhen likes this.
  5. 0
    I had a working interview and the office dress code was black scrub pants and black dress shirt with white labcoat over top, and everyone had their lab coat buttoned to show off their figure.
  6. 0
    I like all colors, even black,
    but, the extremely dark colors,
    and the extremely pale colors,
    both show each every little spot in glaring detail.

    The dark colors show all the powder hand prints each time you take off a glove, or any tiny bit of lint you've picked up.
    The pale colors show any tiny drop of blood or ink or anything else, that you might be "wearing" and don't realize it.


    I like medium colors, for best chance of looking good all shift long.
  7. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    I am very sad to see so many hospitals have required scrubs for their nurses. To me this is a huge indicator of a hospitals lack of respect for nurses. Just curious for those of you unlucky enough to work in such a hospital, what are the physicians required to wear?

    At the hospital I work, the physicians usually wear street clothes and a white lab coat. The registered nurses have (are required) to wear navy blue.
  8. 1
    Where I work, we tried for a little while having all the licensed nurses wear white lab coats over street clothes and all the CNAs wore scrubs. It didn't last too long, cause most of the nurses missed scrubs. Personally, I kind of liked it. But most of the residents' families referred to me as "that really nice doctor who passes pills and empties urinals."
    anotherone likes this.
  9. 2
    Quote from Szasz_is_Right
    I like all white. I think that when nurses wore the traditional white uniforms, they looked very professional.
    See, when I tried it, I tended to look more like a giant, hairy drag queen....
    anotherone and hecallsmeDuchess like this.
  10. 0
    Our floor nurses and unit nurses are in navy, OR nurses in light green, and ER nurses in black.

    The ER nurses are in black because they had informally adopted that color long before the hospital implemented a color-based dress code and were grandfathered in.

    The patients don't seem to care and I haven't heard any comments one way or the other.

    I used to think it was silly but in a large ED, it is helpful to be able to quickly and easily distinguish the ED nurses from everybody else... it's not for the benefit of the patients but rather for the myriad medical and ancillary staff that are always around.


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