Bad resumes/good resumes *rant* - page 2

by mclennan

11,175 Views | 56 Comments

I'm assisting with hiring a new case manager RN and would like to vent about the HORRIBLE quality resumes I am seeing in the mile high stack we're reading through. #1 problem: basic spelling, grammar, punctuation and command... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from x_factor
    I totally agree with this post and every point in it! If you can submit a resume rife with incorrect grammar and punctuation, what's going on when you're charting, drawing up medications, or overlooking something on a med order? The grammar and punctuation even seen on this forum is baffling. A typo here or there on an otherwise well-worded post on this forum is fine, I've made them. But some of the incomprehensible posts that pop up on a daily basis that need a decoder ring just to decipher them makes my head spin.
    Agreed!!! You have me laughing so hard about the decoder ring!!! So true!
    amoLucia likes this.
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    I helped the inservice coordinator review applications for our CNA class one time. She would immediately toss any applications filled out online. She said "they were too lazy to come in and fill it out in person". I was appalled and did not help her ever again. That's what we have the online application for! To drum up more of an applicant pool. I feel that one should save the judgement until I see and speak with an applicant. LPN and RN associate degree programs do not go into depth teaching good writing skills, and I feel experience and professionalism count. I've worked with too many educated jerks to think that perfect grammar will make a good nurse.
    Krither likes this.
  3. 1
    Quote from savoytruffle
    I helped the inservice coordinator review applications for our CNA class one time. She would immediately toss any applications filled out online. She said "they were too lazy to come in and fill it out in person". I was appalled and did not help her ever again. That's what we have the online application for! To drum up more of an applicant pool. I feel that one should save the judgement until I see and speak with an applicant. LPN and RN associate degree programs do not go into depth teaching good writing skills, and I feel experience and professionalism count. I've worked with too many educated jerks to think that perfect grammar will make a good nurse.
    Perfect grammar doesn't guarantee a good nurse, but it will help with finding that job and charting in a readable manner. I've seen some notes charted by nurses that, due to spelling and grammatical errors, would not hold up in court.
    elkpark likes this.
  4. 0
    Thank you all for the updates on the resumes. I am a recent graduate from a ADN program and I am currently working in a non-medical field and have manager experience, however, I have not taken my NCLEX yet as I am waiting for my school to finalize the paperwork to do so. I have applied for a couple of jobs at the hospital that I did most of my rotations at and I was rejected right away online. I am not sure how to make myself more presentable. I have a Bachelors in communication and now a ADN, but I feel lost in this process and discouraged. I really want to work at the hospital where I did my clinicals, but not sure what is appropriate to get noticed. I even emailed my old instructor who is a manager on the floor I would like to work. Any suggestions from those who read resumes, what are you looking for if I do not have experience per se. Thank you
  5. 2
    Quote from GrnTea
    You don't have to look too far around AN to see illiteracy, misspelling, and horrible usage. It makes my eyes cross. Good luck, though.
    I don't mind misspelling on AN. To me, it is an informal mode of communication. As for myself, I type it on my phone which is DIFFICULT. However, I believe I can think of those who you are referring. I sometimes too shake my head, wondering about some people posting. But as long as you are not in a professional environment or professional correspondence, I don't not pick at typos.
    Last edit by Orion81 on Jan 2, '13 : Reason: typo lol
  6. 3
    Quote from BostonTerrierLoverRN
    No problem there, your certainly entitled to your opinion. I want a strong team, not necessarily strong "resume writers." I wish your team the best as it's the patient that matters, not our ego. May the New Year bring you wonderfully written, correctly spelled, and "Objective" free applicant's resumes. I will keep interviewing the qualified, not the ones with "perfect" resume(but judged by what standard I have no idea)- a nurse with 3 years experience in my field will get priority over a perfectly written applicant with no field experience. (regardless of resume perfection)I am also very proud of my second language nurses, who do struggle sometimes with English, as I struggle with the Native American and Hispanic patients that are so proud to have them in the Emergency Department. The best English wouldn't help in multi-cultural emergency situations. English is not the official language of the United States, and few people know that. Again, I hire proficient and skilled nurses, not authors. Your needs may be totally different than mineI guess I do choose to remain part of "the problem" with Nursing.
    Boston, as always, I love your post. Also, you did use the word "principle" correctly. I could nit pick and point out a few grammatical errors in OPs post, BUT, I'm not that petty and frankly do not have the time.
  7. 3
    Come on people. We're not talking about the resume riddled with errors. That is just careless, and yes, would make me question the care they would give a patient. What I take issue with is the tossing of a resume for "ONE" typo. Otherwise, the rest of the original post, I found to be common sense. I guess not, though :/ I read, and re-read my latest resume only to find a few months later that (horror :0) there was indeed a typo. I must be a terrible nurse and get out of the profession now.
  8. 2
    I'm not a nurse... YET! Also, I have not majored in resumé writing yet. Although, I felt like this post was a prime example of how not to treat people. I always read about nurses and student nurses here on AN, venting about how badly their supervisor, clinical instructor, or whoever, belittle them for one mistake they made. No second chances, no re-do's, no rewinds. One blimp on the screen and you're out... Really? No wonder nurses feel under appreciated.
    Orion81 and BostonTerrierLoverRN like this.
  9. 1
    It can really be frustrating to see that resumes are done haphazardly. It can make you think twice about hiring this applicants because if they are not careful about the resume they send, how can they be careful about taking care of the patients.
    elkpark likes this.
  10. 0
    LOVE you. I was beginning to lose faith in the profession before seeing this...


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