Bad resumes/good resumes *rant* - page 2

I'm assisting with hiring a new case manager RN and would like to vent about the HORRIBLE quality resumes I am seeing in the mile high stack we're reading through. #1 problem: basic spelling,... Read More

  1. Visit  sweetpeamax1206 profile page
    0
    Thank you all for the updates on the resumes. I am a recent graduate from a ADN program and I am currently working in a non-medical field and have manager experience, however, I have not taken my NCLEX yet as I am waiting for my school to finalize the paperwork to do so. I have applied for a couple of jobs at the hospital that I did most of my rotations at and I was rejected right away online. I am not sure how to make myself more presentable. I have a Bachelors in communication and now a ADN, but I feel lost in this process and discouraged. I really want to work at the hospital where I did my clinicals, but not sure what is appropriate to get noticed. I even emailed my old instructor who is a manager on the floor I would like to work. Any suggestions from those who read resumes, what are you looking for if I do not have experience per se. Thank you
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  3. Visit  Orion81 profile page
    2
    Quote from GrnTea
    You don't have to look too far around AN to see illiteracy, misspelling, and horrible usage. It makes my eyes cross. Good luck, though.
    I don't mind misspelling on AN. To me, it is an informal mode of communication. As for myself, I type it on my phone which is DIFFICULT. However, I believe I can think of those who you are referring. I sometimes too shake my head, wondering about some people posting. But as long as you are not in a professional environment or professional correspondence, I don't not pick at typos.
    Last edit by Orion81 on Jan 2, '13 : Reason: typo lol
  4. Visit  Orion81 profile page
    3
    Quote from BostonTerrierLoverRN
    No problem there, your certainly entitled to your opinion. I want a strong team, not necessarily strong "resume writers." I wish your team the best as it's the patient that matters, not our ego. May the New Year bring you wonderfully written, correctly spelled, and "Objective" free applicant's resumes. I will keep interviewing the qualified, not the ones with "perfect" resume(but judged by what standard I have no idea)- a nurse with 3 years experience in my field will get priority over a perfectly written applicant with no field experience. (regardless of resume perfection)I am also very proud of my second language nurses, who do struggle sometimes with English, as I struggle with the Native American and Hispanic patients that are so proud to have them in the Emergency Department. The best English wouldn't help in multi-cultural emergency situations. English is not the official language of the United States, and few people know that. Again, I hire proficient and skilled nurses, not authors. Your needs may be totally different than mineI guess I do choose to remain part of "the problem" with Nursing.
    Boston, as always, I love your post. Also, you did use the word "principle" correctly. I could nit pick and point out a few grammatical errors in OPs post, BUT, I'm not that petty and frankly do not have the time.
  5. Visit  Orion81 profile page
    3
    Come on people. We're not talking about the resume riddled with errors. That is just careless, and yes, would make me question the care they would give a patient. What I take issue with is the tossing of a resume for "ONE" typo. Otherwise, the rest of the original post, I found to be common sense. I guess not, though :/ I read, and re-read my latest resume only to find a few months later that (horror :0) there was indeed a typo. I must be a terrible nurse and get out of the profession now.
  6. Visit  B00P profile page
    2
    I'm not a nurse... YET! Also, I have not majored in resum writing yet. Although, I felt like this post was a prime example of how not to treat people. I always read about nurses and student nurses here on AN, venting about how badly their supervisor, clinical instructor, or whoever, belittle them for one mistake they made. No second chances, no re-do's, no rewinds. One blimp on the screen and you're out... Really? No wonder nurses feel under appreciated.
    Orion81 and BostonTerrierLoverRN like this.
  7. Visit  amygarside profile page
    1
    It can really be frustrating to see that resumes are done haphazardly. It can make you think twice about hiring this applicants because if they are not careful about the resume they send, how can they be careful about taking care of the patients.
    elkpark likes this.
  8. Visit  TheBlackDogWaits profile page
    0
    LOVE you. I was beginning to lose faith in the profession before seeing this...
  9. Visit  theantichick profile page
    3
    I'm a new GN and have only had a couple of interviews so far. However, I've been in Corporate America for a good many years, and I've been on hiring committees many times.

    I applaud people who set a higher requirement for resumes. I *do* think that throwing out a resume with a single typo is a bit excessive, depending on the typo. Some typos should be glaring to anyone with a command of the language. Some are subtle and harder to ferret out.

    Bottom line, if you're preparing a resume, have it looked at by as many people as possible - preferably people who can tell if the content appropriate, and also be nit-picky about spelling and grammar. I'm affectionately known among my friends as a grammar geek and have cheerfully spent evenings debating the worth of the Oxford Comma. Typos and errors STILL slip by me when I've been looking at a document forever. That's why I have friends who are ALSO grammar geeks - well, that and to have someone to debate the Oxford Comma with!!
    Last edit by theantichick on Jan 2, '13 : Reason: fix grammatical error since it's that kind of thread. :)
  10. Visit  Calabria profile page
    0
    If we want to gain more respect as a profession, we need to appear as professionals in all aspects. Kudos to you for taking this approach!
  11. Visit  FlorenceNtheMachine profile page
    3
    I'm in the team where ONE typo does not = ONE patient demise/mistake. I've met some honest to goodness GENIUS people in my life and they had poor spelling and grammar. Did they proofread emails and important paperwork? Oh yes, they did. And the very, very cautious ones knew to get more than one person to do it. But I guarantee you, each and every post here so far probably has some minor error in syntax, etc.

    Nowe if theRE resumay lookz like this:

    F, Machine RN
    TooMuchJellyinMyBottom@ihatepeople.com

    Pass! But one typo may be precluding an excellent candidate!
  12. Visit  wooh profile page
    5
    Is it really so much to expect someone to proofread their resume? Then proofread it again. And perhaps get someone else to look it over. While perfect grammar might be a bit high of an expectation for someone not applying to be an editor or proofreader, typos shouldn't be on a resume. You're applying for a job. No, you don't have to be perfect. But be careful with how you present yourself, especially when you have plenty of time to prepare that presentation.
  13. Visit  TheBlackDogWaits profile page
    3
    Quote from FlorenceNtheMachine
    I'm in the team where ONE typo does not = ONE patient demise/mistake. I've met some honest to goodness GENIUS people in my life and they had poor spelling and grammar. Did they proofread emails and important paperwork? Oh yes, they did. And the very, very cautious ones knew to get more than one person to do it. But I guarantee you, each and every post here so far probably has some minor error in syntax, etc. Nowe if theRE resumay lookz like this: F, Machine RNTooMuchJellyinMyBottom@ihatepeople.comPass! But one typo may be precluding an excellent candidate!
    Nicely put; er, well done; er, nicely said? I can't decide now! Should it be hyphenated? Nonetheless.... great approach.
  14. Visit  wooh profile page
    1
    Quote from FlorenceNtheMachine
    But I guarantee you, each and every post here so far probably has some minor error in syntax, etc.
    Acceptable in something that's casually written. But I hope most people put more thought into their resume, since it's the first impression a potential employer will have, than into a quickly prepared post on the internet. If they're only willing to put in minimal effort to get the job, there's plenty of people who are willing to work harder (and proofread) to get most jobs.
    elkpark likes this.


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