Pregnancy Discrimination - Interview - page 9

by Art_Vandelay

18,452 Views | 107 Comments

I have read more than a few threads on here and quite frankly I am a little appauled at the attitudes. No wonder women ask if they should hide the pregnancy! They're discriminated by female nursing collegues right from the... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Are these "family friendly" institutions also more flexible, understanding and nonjudgemental to the nurse whose husband has early onset Alzheimer's and might have to hurry home to sit with him because the caregiver left early? Are they as friendly and understanding to the nurse who has an ailing mother at home to care for? How about a dying and beloved dog? Pregnancy lasts nine months. You might not want to base long term decisions on something so temporary.
    I see your point. Quite honestly, I wish employers were. Having a family member with Alzheimer's can be extremely trying emotionally on family and even from a care giver's outsider perspective it is quite heartbreaking. And an ailing mother? I watched a close friend's mom die of ALS within a few years of diagnosis. Yes, my friend who cared for her deserved special treatment. She had a mom who was dying and losing function daily in front of her; I still can't imagine watching a parent go through that. She was always very private and I never quite knew how to talk about it with her. I am an animal lover (my animals are my child) so I need no convincing that animals deserve the utmost of treatment too. Yes, in my pretend world, nurses(pregnant or not) would have a managable patient load and be able to spend quality time with their patients, at the expense of corporate "fat cats" ludicrous pay check. Yes, you can take home a little less profit so that my working conditions are more decent. But, I'll come back to reality...conditions are more often cut throat, competitive, and employer friendly. Sigh.
    Meriwhen likes this.
  2. 0
    Quote from Jory
    I have lots of friends that are soon-to-be nurses that when they try to find a job while pregnant, I don't understand at all, the debate "should I mention this at the interview?"....
    Call me crazy, but I am seeking this position to maintain a skill set, not for a paycheck. (But I understand the paycheck motive too.) I don't want to come on AN complaining, "I've been gone so long, and I can't cut it on the floor. I can't place an IV, NG, etc. " Or more importantly, have my med/surg knowledge base fall behind. Quite frankly, I would be embarrassed with experience if I couldn't do a simple skill like starting an IV after a few tries because I hadn't placed one in a year. (No offense to people whose IV skills aren't the strongest.) That is more my concern. So, let the employer watch me disappear for six to eight weeks but not have to provide a long initial training period. Or, have the employer treat me like a new grad and give me a LONG orientation period a year from now. I've thought about alternatives, like BSN with clinical components, but the local ones I've found are expensive! My partner didn't see the logic in applying for jobs now either, but he works in a technical field, so he should understand the concept of technical dinosaur. Furthermore, I don't see hospital volunteers placing IVs, dropping NGs or providing patient education. Plus, cooking, cleaning, shopping, and brewing baby(although I am excited) isn't challenging enough for me.
  3. 2
    Quote from dirtyhippiegirl
    Didn't you get the memo? Having a baby is the most important thing that you will ever do as a woman and protecting it from womb to tomb is sacrosanct. Jeez. :P
    ....
    I feel guilty for laughing at this. I'm happy about my baby, but tend to gag or roll my eyes when I overhear pregnant women in all their excitement. "Yay, life is wonderful; baby is born and all is at peace with the world." Um, not really. A LOT of the world is still suffering, and while I have cause for excitement, life isn't wonderful for a lot of struggling people here and abroad.
    dirtyhippiegirl and Lynx25 like this.
  4. 6
    Quote from ShayRN
    When I had my son, 11 years ago, I worked on a cardiothoracic step down unit. I did not take any isolations patients, I did not do any heavy lifting. Not because I refused, but because my co-workers stepped up and did it for me. I would return the favor by starting a difficult IV for them or by helping them get caught up on a med pass. Then, guess what? I had the baby and returned to work. He was my last child. Within two years all those lovely co-workers were having babies of their own, I took all the isolation patients and did their heavy lifting so that they wouldn't hurt themselves or the precious babies they were carrying. No, "popping out a kid" doesn't make you special. But, that baby IS special. One of the most special gifts ever and I don't care what anyone says, you protect your child from the womb to the grave. I am actually appalled by the comments here. Just goes to show, women (not nurses) women are our own worst enemies.
    I'm so happy for you that you had wonderful co-workers who stepped in and helped you out when you were pregnant. And that you're happy to help them. However, some of us would find it difficult to do ALL the isolations and heavy lifting in our unit because several other nurses were pregnant and the same time. And I don't think that's my job, either. The fact that you or someone else is fortunate enough to be able to procreate when you want to is fabulous for you . . . but if you cannot or will not do your job because of your "precious cargo", then you need to vacate the job and let someone who is willing to do it DO it.

    None of the comments here have indicated that babies are not special gifts to their parents. But they're not special gifts to your colleagues and to everyone else in the world. I find myself appalled at the notion that failure to procreate makes me less special than anyone else. And the women are our own worst enemies part -- SOME women are other women's worst enemy. There's more to being a woman -- and having a family -- than breeding.
    Paws2people, rubato, not.done.yet, and 3 others like this.
  5. 1
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    I didn't post it to make friends Klone, lol. I posted it to help the OP. Nor did I "blacklist" the MA in question, the practice manager did. I don't have the authority to determine who is and is not eligible for rehire within the company statewide, lol. I do decide who works for me, and I won't work with someone who is untrustworthy. The practice manager made the administrative decision not to keep her in the company in any capacity.
    She is gone, and I'll be interviewing all next week I guess. Maybe I'll hire a male this time.

    OP, my advice is to just tell the whole truth. Find a natural time in the interview to mention it, and if it doesn't present itself then I'd just mention it at the end of the interview. If I were interviewing you, I probably wouldn't hire you immediately, but I'd respect you for telling me and hang on to the resume for the following year. I do wish you luck with both your family and career.
    So how does it feel to be responsible for someone being blacklisted from "the largest consortium of providers in the state"?

    "No will touch her", effectively depriving someone of the ability to support self and family.

    Even though "technically" you didn't do it, "the practice manager did".

    Sounds vindictive to me.
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
  6. 3
    Quote from Mulan
    So how does it feel to be responsible for someone being blacklisted from "the largest consortium of providers in the state"?

    "No will touch her", effectively depriving someone of the ability to support self and family.

    Even though "technically" you didn't do it, "the practice manager did".

    Sounds vindictive to me.
    Unless my reading skills are off, BlueDevil is, in fact, NOT the daddy. S/he is not responsible for:

    A) Making the baby
    B) Making the woman choose to conceal something that's quite related to their job
    rubato, BlueDevil,DNP, and Altra like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from Lynx25
    Unless my reading skills are off, BlueDevil is, in fact, NOT the daddy. S/he is not responsible for:

    A) Making the baby
    B) Making the woman choose to conceal something that's quite related to their job
    Nevertheless, arguably BlueDevil's actions were vindictive. Maybe if I were in his predicament, I would have been ticked off too, but it sounded more like an inconvenience rather than an actual problem. The MAs I have seen work with ambulatory patients, not total care or isolation precaution ones. Furthermore, I stand by my statement that some pregnant women don't ask for the easy route (even though some from the previous pregnancy nurses' posts some are lucky to be in a trade off environment) and I have seen them work until they are ready to give birth. Arguably, it is still 1950s mentality to assume pregnancy equals disability. But, plenty of posters have provided numerous examples in this thread of working with pregnant women and feeling shafted so I can see the other side. But as far as the "moral" standpoint, there does not seem to be a consensus.

    Granted, it probably wasn't the best choice to pursue employment now given the apparent disadvantage in unspoken hiring practices, and I probably will not pursue further after this interview until delivery just based on this disadvantage. But, then comes the next disadvantage: lack of employment for so long. :/ I can't win.
    Last edit by Art_Vandelay on Sep 8, '12
  8. 0
    Well you don't have to like it or agree with me. She's gone, it's over, and other than being annoyed that I have to take additional time to interview again, I feel fine about it.
    I have high standards and she didn't meet them, end of story.
    It's ok with me if that makes you think less of the BlueDevil, lol.

    I was, honestly, trying to help you whitey.
  9. 0
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    Well you don't have to like it or agree with me. She's gone, it's over, and other than being annoyed that I have to take additional time to interview again, I feel fine about it.
    I have high standards and she didn't meet them, end of story.
    It's ok with me if that makes you think less of the BlueDevil, lol.

    I was, honestly, trying to help you whitey.
    I sure hope she finds out, or even suspects it. What a stupid move by a supposedly large corporation, seriously.
  10. 2
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    Well you don't have to like it or agree with me. She's gone, it's over, and other than being annoyed that I have to take additional time to interview again, I feel fine about it.
    I have high standards and she didn't meet them, end of story.
    It's ok with me if that makes you think less of the BlueDevil, lol.

    I was, honestly, trying to help you whitey.
    Well, why don't you put me at the top of that interview list, BlueDevil? I'm sure I have everything you're looking for. lol!

    p.s. no personal offense taken


Top