Pregnancy Discrimination - Interview - page 5

I have read more than a few threads on here and quite frankly I am a little appauled at the attitudes. No wonder women ask if they should hide the pregnancy! They're discriminated by female nursing... Read More

  1. Visit  klone profile page
    4
    Quote from whitey_fisk
    The truth is that pregnancy discrimination would be very hard to prove, especially in this economy with its glut of nurses.
    Unless, of course, they come to AN and announce that's why they didn't hire the person.
  2. Visit  klone profile page
    1
    Quote from adnrnstudent
    Not being mean here, being real. Why would an employer want to hire a pregnant girl, give them insurance, and then hold their job when they take FML? Per Diem work is what I'd go for.
    I dunno, because some employers are decent? And family friendly? And recognize that they are valuable employees and worth it?
    Art_Vandelay likes this.
  3. Visit  not.done.yet profile page
    7
    Wouldn't giving special treatment, assignments and desirable days off to pregnant women be the equivalent of discriminating against those who are NOT pregnant? Just wondering. And giving preferable days off or easier assignments or jobs to those who are pregnant in order to be "family friendly" is a ridiculous way of looking at it. Most of us have a family, whether or not we have children or are pregnant.
    SmilingBluEyes, RNsRWe, NoonieRN, and 4 others like this.
  4. Visit  redhead_NURSE98! profile page
    2
    Quote from not.done.yet
    Wouldn't giving special treatment, assignments and desirable days off to pregnant women be the equivalent of discriminating against those who are NOT pregnant? Just wondering. And giving preferable days off or easier assignments or jobs to those who are pregnant in order to be "family friendly" is a ridiculous way of looking at it. Most of us have a family, whether or not we have children or are pregnant.
    People who are not in any sort of protected class can't be discriminated against, in the legal sense. It's unfortunate for those of us who don't have kids, or are men, but that's life. I had to lol at the above saying facilities would open themselves to "reverse discrimination;" good luck with that one, pal!

    They should NOT be getting easier assignments. If they couldn't do the job their doctor should have written them off. On my floor we have a detailed sheet each shift that each nurse fills out giving their patients' issues like contact precautions, PICCs, confused, fall risk, and the level of nursing care needed for each patient, and we also keep a record of each day's assignments, so it could easily be shown to HR that a pregnant person is constantly sucking up all the min's and mod's. If I felt for a second that someone was constantly receiving a disproportionate assignment I'd be the first person discussing it. In reality though, even working with a crew that at one time had 4 pregnant women on it, I have never felt that way.
    Fiona59 and Meriwhen like this.
  5. Visit  Art_Vandelay profile page
    1
    The pregnant employee I spoke of earlier was definitely given preferential treatment; she was always assigned the easiest patients and never had to do any lifting. She was babied and milked it. (Pun intended.). But that's not what I'm going to do.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  6. Visit  amoLucia profile page
    1
    [QUOTE=not.done.yet;6904525]Wouldn't giving special treatment, assignments and desirable days off to pregnant women be the equivalent of discriminating against those who are NOT pregnant? Just wondering. And giving preferable days off or easier assignments or jobs to those who are pregnantit all in order to be "family friendly" is a ridiculous way of looking at it. Most of us have a family, whether or not we have children or are pregnant.[

    You said it all!!!

    I have a suggestion - since we're talking reduced job duties for pregnant employees, how about REDUCED WAGES for them ??? Say, half-wages? Would that be fair?? You'll get paid only for the reduced, lessened work load.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  7. Visit  Meriwhen profile page
    2
    Quote from dirtyhippiegirl
    Eh. Why get pregnant when you know that you'll be job hunting soon/now? Is getting pregnant when you can't afford to pay your bills a good idea, really?
    Not knowing the OP's circumstances, keep in mind that not all pregnancies are timed with precision or even planned in the first place. And birth control has been known to fail.

    Sometimes it just happens.
    Elladora and Art_Vandelay like this.
  8. Visit  Altra profile page
    7
    Those considering simultaneous job-seeking and pregnancy, who are responsible for their own employer-provided health insurance, should carefully investigate the possibility that their new employer's insurance excludes maternal benefits for the first 6 months to 1 year.

    And, recalling my own pregnancy-induced hypertension, required bedrest, and c-section always makes me chuckle when I read of those who just *know* that they will work up until their delivery date, and return to work within a couple of week after delivery, *for sure*. Life is what happens when you're making other plans.
    NyteshiftLVN, Dazglue, amoLucia, and 4 others like this.
  9. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    0
    I know a manage who will hire male nurses or menopausal women over those of child bearing age.

    We have one year maternity leave up here and pretty much everyone takes it all. I know of one unit who has a nurse who since 2008 has been on mat leave three times. Comes back to work with a re-orientation period, works 20 weeks and guess what? She's off again. 20 weeks is the magic number to qualify for maternity pay on unemployment benefits.

    We all wish she'd resign and co prn but she likes "her line" and doesn't want to give it up. I don't think she's going to find it easy to return this time, the contract has changed it's wording about return. Might wind up on the acute care of elderly unit and not the one she's on now.
  10. Visit  cienurse profile page
    2
    Yes it is called "reasonable accomodation" Also, once a pregnancy advances to the last trimester and the nurse is having difficulty, we have had the nurse bring a copy of her job description to her physician visit and ask the doctor to address the critical elements of the job. If the Physician's opinion is that the nurse cannot perform the critical elements of the position while pregnant, we can either provide an easier assignment, if available, or the nurse can go on maternity leave at that time. The only time that light duty needs to be accomodated is with a work-related injury.
    not.done.yet and VictoriaGayle like this.
  11. Visit  Art_Vandelay profile page
    0
    For those of you that advocate disclosure, how would you go about doing it? Wouldn't it be an awkward conversation. I do not know how to go about this.
  12. Visit  Art_Vandelay profile page
    0
    And at what point in the process?
  13. Visit  Nascar nurse profile page
    6
    I think you should use that charming personality of yours and go thru that first interview with a bang. You usually have a good sense if the hiring manager is clicking with you. At the end of the interview you are often given the opportunity to ask any questions. Ask any questions you may have then say something such as "And, one last thing. Because I have such a strong sense of integrity that I can bring to your organization, I just want to let you know that I am pregnant. I can promise you that I won't be that whiny nurse expecting easy work assignments and I anticipate only needing off xxx amount of weeks. I think in spite of this, you will find that my _ _ _ (qualifications) makes me the best candidate to fill the position".


    I've been hiring for many years and I have been burned by some really bad hires. But, on the other hand, I've been agreeable to some wild situations just because I liked someones personality enough and knew they would be the perfect fit for the rest of my crew that it was worth jumping thru some hoops. It doesn't happen often, but it does happen. Work that personality and have the nursing skills to back it up. You've got me on your side. Please PM me if you get that job so I can wish you a congratulations. I will really want to know the outcome.


    Editing to add: As a long time manager I think I get what many newer managers sometimes miss. A happy staff with great attitudes just makes EVERYTHING better. Patient care and satisfaction goes thru the roof and ultimately my job gets easier all around. This is why hiring a great personality that fits with the rest of your crew is so important. I can teach some skills if need be but I have never been able to teach attitude!
    NyteshiftLVN, ShayRN, Fiona59, and 3 others like this.

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