Pregnancy Discrimination - Interview - page 4

by Art_Vandelay

18,449 Views | 107 Comments

I have read more than a few threads on here and quite frankly I am a little appauled at the attitudes. No wonder women ask if they should hide the pregnancy! They're discriminated by female nursing collegues right from the... Read More


  1. 5
    Quote from anotherone
    What are the state and federal laws on this? I only know of anti discrimination for race , religion county of origin, materal status, veteran status and gender. there may be others, i am not sure. the employer should look out for themselves just as employees should. we have a few pregnant staff members lately and some are annoying (not new with the pregnancy)Refusing all isos even things like mrsa, refusing heavy pts, complete care pts. well guess what all the pts are sometimes complete cares, dts, drunks , 350lbs,violent or psychotic 1:1s and some prisioners and other non friendly non walkie talkies. There often is not a 8month pregnant nurse friendly assignment and i dont want to hear it. last time one was livid she had an mr complete care pt and went on and on. she had the 3 walkie talkies on the floor. actually the easiest assignment. should someone get more pts because she is pregnant or should assignments be lighter and disregard what nurse had those pts the day before? i have seen the same resentment or more with those on light duty even when it is employer related, if not , caused. if i am in charge i do try to give the 7month+ nurses easier assignments if able to.
    The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978

    Facts About Pregnancy Discrimination

    And it gives no protection to the people you're describing who refuse assignments and complain. Those people should have a lovely conversation with their manager, or possibly HR, because if they can't do the job they don't need to be working on the floor.
  2. 1
    Quote from whitey_fisk
    So why is non disclosure viewed so heinously by employers? I view my work practices as ethically sound, and don't want to come across as "questionable" in any way. But, I REALLY want this job...so why does it make me the bad guy to hide it? I am fully capable to perform the per diem job asked of me IMHO.

    p.s. thanks!

    I think per diem is PERFECT! I think for that position you should NOT feel like the bad guy for not disclosing.

    But full time is different, as outlined so well by another poster. B/c you KNOW you will out in a few months. It would be an awkward conversation w your manager.

    Go get your per diem position, don't disclose, have your baby, then apply full time when you (and baby!) are ready.

    (((Hugs)))
    Art_Vandelay likes this.
  3. 2
    It's a difficult position to be in. Telling the truth might eliminate you from consideration, but withholding the truth might really burn some bridges.

    I hired a new MA last week and she started on Tuesday. She told me Tuesday morning that she is 3 months pregnant. I was furious, because no, I wouldn't have hired her if I knew that. Having a float MA who doesn't know my routine and preferences screws my entire day to pieces, and I am not going to do that for 6 to 12 consecutive weeks. She suspected as much and told me that is why she didn't mention it during the interviews. What she didn't think through is that she has a 90 probation period. Guess what, she isn't going to make it that far. We decided within 2 hours of getting the happy news that we are going to let her go tomorrow afternoon.
    I could never trust her or believe anything she tells me, because I now know she tells truths selectively, to benefit herself. I can't work with someone I don't trust; the stakes are too high and my responsibility too great. Before the end of her probation period I don't need a reason, and she will just be told "we are not a good fit, it isn't working out," yada yada yada. It isn't the pregnacy so much as the dishonesty and self serving approach. So, with the subsequent total lack of trust and respect, no, she and I aren't a good fit. Worse for her still, she's done with the whole company, forever. We are the largest consortium of providers in the state, and no one will touch her. If she had told the truth I probably wouldn't have hired her, but someone else might have, if not now perhaps after the delivery. Now she's totally screwed.

    So think about your options very carefully. Good luck.
    rubato and anotherone like this.
  4. 1
    Quote from redhead_NURSE98!
    The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978

    Facts About Pregnancy Discrimination

    And it gives no protection to the people you're describing who refuse assignments and complain. Those people should have a lovely conversation with their manager, or possibly HR, because if they can't do the job they don't need to be working on the floor.
    The truth is that pregnancy discrimination would be very hard to prove, especially in this economy with its glut of nurses.

    Oddly, the interview process reminds me of that Mrs. Doubtfire scene, where Sally Field's character Miranda is interviewing prospective babysitters after she has discovered the truth about Daniel's crossdressing. Her interview of the candidate goes something like this:

    Candidate: "I don't do laundry, I don't do windows, I don't do carpets, I don't do bathtubs, I don't do toilets, I don't do diapers...I don't do washing, I don't do basements, I don't do reading!"
    Miranda: Smiling at the candidate, she says, "Well, we have your number." Then when the candidate turns her back to walk toward the door, she makes a throat slitting gesture.

    Back to the topic at hand, I agree with the comment about having a "lovely conversation with their manager." The pregnant co-worker I described earlier used to get the EASIEST assignments now that I recollect on the issue. I'm not asking for easy assignments; I just wish my pregnancy weren't a factor. I'm not looking for easy street, but I could understand manager trepidations in light of reflection. Management used to tread lightly around that pregnant worker, probably for fear of lawsuits should something happen.
    anotherone likes this.
  5. 2
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    It's a difficult position to be in. Telling the truth might eliminate you from consideration, but withholding the truth might really burn some bridges.

    I hired a new MA last week and she started on Tuesday. She told me Tuesday morning that she is 3 months pregnant. I was furious, because no, I wouldn't have hired her if I knew that. Having a float MA who doesn't know my routine and preferences screws my entire day to pieces, and I am not going to do that for 6 to 12 consecutive weeks. She suspected as much and told me that is why she didn't mention it during the interviews. What she didn't think through is that she has a 90 probation period. Guess what, she isn't going to make it that far. We decided within 2 hours of getting the happy news that we are going to let her go tomorrow afternoon.
    I could never trust her or believe anything she tells me, because I now know she tells truths selectively, to benefit herself. I can't work with someone I don't trust; the stakes are too high and my responsibility too great. Before the end of her probation period I don't need a reason, and she will just be told "we are not a good fit, it isn't working out," yada yada yada. It isn't the pregnacy so much as the dishonesty and self serving approach. So, with the subsequent total lack of trust and respect, no, she and I aren't a good fit. Worse for her still, she's done with the whole company, forever. We are the largest consortium of providers in the state, and no one will touch her. If she had told the truth I probably wouldn't have hired her, but someone else might have, if not now perhaps after the delivery. Now she's totally screwed.

    So think about your options very carefully. Good luck.
    I appreciate the honesty, but ooooooouch!! I understand that in outpatient settings providers have specific MAs who work with them, so I could see how this would be frustrating. However, on a hospital floor, as you know there are multiple nurses not providing care with one specific provider, but multiple. The main issue at hand is unfortunately the "I need a few weeks off when I have the baby." And by "a few," I would say two to three if I am able to return to work that quickly. And under the hourly obligations as listed on the advertisement, I could take three weeks off and still meet the monthly per diem requirement. In no way do I genuinely want to default on any obligations to my employer. In actuality, what you plan to do is lawsuit material, but I can't see how it would be provable. Arguably, an employer could say the employee didn't meet up to expectations, etc. Ironically, since under oath you would be obligated to tell the truth, doesn't that turn the ethics table around?
  6. 0
    Not being mean here, being real. Why would an employer want to hire a pregnant girl, give them insurance, and then hold their job when they take FML? Per Diem work is what I'd go for.
  7. 0
    Quote from adnrnstudent
    Not being mean here, being real. Why would an employer want to hire a pregnant girl, give them insurance, and then hold their job when they take FML? Per Diem work is what I'd go for.
    No, you're being mean. (j/k). Yeah, I get it, it sucks for the employer. But the position IS per diem, so maybe they'll fall in like with me. And I still think the mentality is 1950ish in that women want to work but they want to have babies too. It's still about ME ME ME from whichever perspective.
  8. 2
    Perhaps, but it is what it is.
    And inpatient is different to a degree, but to me it is the lack of forthrightness that is at issue, more than the pregnancy itself. You might be running into someone like me who finds it unacceptable. I didn't think my anecdote would be well received, but I did want you to consider the possibility that there could be unintended consequences secondary to failure to disclose information they may find pertinent. You are not obligated to of course, but from my point of view a pregnant woman won't always be pregnant, but a liar is always going to be untrustworthy. You don't want to be branded as such.
    Altra and Spidey's mom like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from not.done.yet
    I must say, your charm seems rather considerable. And personality/fit DOES matter...a lot actually.
    Darn, there is no blushing emoticon! How about Thanksgiving instead... I mean, I'm going to need off then. Just kidding! and thanks.
  10. 1
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    Perhaps, but it is what it is.
    And inpatient is different to a degree, but to me it is the lack of forthrightness that is at issue, more than the pregnancy itself. You might be running into someone like me who finds it unacceptable. I didn't think my anecdote would be well received, but I did want you to consider the possibility that there could be unintended consequences secondary to failure to disclose information they may find pertinent. You are not obligated to of course, but from my point of view a pregnant woman won't always be pregnant, but a liar is always going to be untrustworthy. You don't want to be branded as such.
    No, I don't. Unfortunately, I also don't want my nursing skills to be a year in default by the time an employer would consider me sans pregnancy. But there is the BSN option in the meantime, which I am pursing. But, the program I chose has no clinical component so that doesn't help me there. If only hospital jobs weren't so competitive...you always have to maintain an edge.
    anie10 likes this.


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