Changing Job less than 1 yr after graduation

  1. 0
    I graduated with my BSN back in May. After passing my NCLEX I started orientation as a critical care nurse on the cardiac floor I had my preceptorship on and was kept on a tech for the next year until I graduated. My time on this floor as an "RN" has only been since August, but most of that has actually been orientation.

    I am not very satisfied with my time here and have started to entertain the idea of moving hospitals, but many of the similar positions offered at competing hospitals post requiring 2yrs experience for Critical Care Cardiac nurses.

    What are my options as a "new graduate"? Is this something I really have to grin and bear for the next year?
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  4. 19 Comments so far...

  5. 3
    Quote from videoguru27
    I graduated with my BSN back in May. After passing my NCLEX I started orientation as a critical care nurse on the cardiac floor I had my preceptorship on and was kept on a tech for the next year until I graduated. My time on this floor as an "RN" has only been since August, but most of that has actually been orientation.

    I am not very satisfied with my time here and have started to entertain the idea of moving hospitals, but many of the similar positions offered at competing hospitals post requiring 2yrs experience for Critical Care Cardiac nurses.

    What are my options as a "new graduate"? Is this something I really have to grin and bear for the next year?
    Hate to be the bearer of bad news, but yes, you kind of have to grin and bear until you get the experience. Your first job is not going to be perfect, no job will for that matter. As long as you don't fear for your patient's safety I would keep the job until you get enough experience to become competent in the critical care area, then doors will open.
    KimberlyRN89, poppycat, and elkpark like this.
  6. 2
    Stay. Stay. Stay. Stay...stay. (that word start to looks funny after awhile, huh?)

    I say this because I'm a new grad (Dec. 2011, NCLEX Feb. 2012) and I worked 5 months on an acute psychiatric floor (yeah, not my first pick), but then moved to another city to start a RN-to-BSN program. Since then it's been a nightmare trying to find my next job.

    If you feel like you're unable to care for your patients, then I guess you could justify leaving, but if it's more due to the general 'feel' of the floor, then I'd say stick with it for at least 18 months in total.

    Hope that helps, and congrats on landing a critical care job right out of school.
    KimberlyRN89 and elkpark like this.
  7. 1
    Stay. Learn everything you can. Be 100% confident in your clinical skills. Take whatever certifications they will give you in year 2. If it is a matter of not liking critical care, start thinking about what may be more to your liking. Once you have good critical care experience and skills, you can go anywhere, and start looking at some internal job opportunities and see if perhaps after the second year, you would like to switch specialties. Maybe the ED? Or maybe work on an EMT and think about flight nursing--the possibilities are endless when you have a good firm foundation. I know it may seem like FOREVER, but it really will fly by, although it doesn't seem that way now. Good luck!
    Orange Tree likes this.
  8. 2
    I do not agree with all the above posters - life is too crazy to be miserable. That said, there's a difference as a new nurse between feeling "lost" and then hating your job.

    Also, it sounds like you just don't like the hospital - but you like the critical care role? This does bring up a few issues. It's hard to get critical care experience as a new grad nowdays, and it'd be hard for you to transfer doing the same thing without at least 1-2 years. I think that's where these posters are saying "stay where you are", and I slightly agree.

    The most ideal thing to do would be to job search while you retain your current position; and not leave until you have another one. I would have to agree it'd be almost ignorant to leave your position without another one.

    If you're trying to switch specialties, start searching in February (or whenever it is you'll have six months, I think I remember reading August start date). I would try to stick it out for at least six months experience.

    Good luck, and know that you're not the only one.
  9. 2
    I agree with the above poster. If you can't stay, find another job first; you may be stuck without one for a long time if you don't. Do you feel confident in your position? It could be hard to get another job with very much orientation, four months in a specialty unit mostly on orientation doesn't account for much experience to some employers. They may not be will to spend the money to orient you to their unit seeing that you wanted to split so quickly from your current job. Orienting cost a lot of money, and money is something most hospitals are short on right now. Your considered a high risk gamble to a new employer right now.
    Meriwhen and GM2RN like this.
  10. 2
    I say stick it out unless the working conditions are horrid/dangerous. Job 'satisfaction' is a luxury, not a right or a given. I hate to be so frank, but it needs to be said.. jobs are scarce, and you're very lucky to have been placed in a specialty like CICU right out of college. Such opportunity may not present itself again. And to be completely honest, the more new grads drop such opportunities, the less likely hospitals are going to be to offer these chances to future grads.
    Orange Tree and student forever like this.
  11. 2
    [QUOTE=videoguru27;7093938

    many of the similar positions offered at competing hospitals post requiring 2yrs experience for Critical Care Cardiac nurses.

    What are my options as a "new graduate"? [/QUOTE]

    Your question is answered right there.
    not.done.yet and Orange Tree like this.
  12. 1
    Yes most likely you will have to grin and bear for years to come. They like make you feel that way and they aren't going to stop. EVER.

    Should you chose to change hospital be very tactful and go to place where you know you can stay for years. Or else you winded up being a new grad job hopper and now you are really unemployable.

    I know one ICU charge and one float pool nurse with ICU training who put PICC line for living now working on the floor in god forsaken places.

    I know another ICU ex-new grad with 3 years of experience who suffered series of bad events, and now unemployed and planning on moving into the car next month.

    THey all thought there were better thing out there and they don't have to take _______.

    PS
    You should always have exist stratergy, such as, "I got into ARNP program, so I am going to be working on call. I am swill with you guys tho!" sort of stuff. WHich means you should spend your free type taking pre-req,and collecting references and attending open houses and speaking to the program advisor

    Comes in really handy
    Meriwhen likes this.
  13. 0
    PPS
    Have you leaerned how to do heart

    that will come in handy when you are out there in cold.

    PPPS
    As soon as you get a chance, get CCRN. That usully shuts alot of people up and also look good on resume


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