Have you ever performed CPR? Results?: - page 4

I don't know how to insert a poll tool, but here's my story. LTC, shift change, I went looking for the day nurse. She said "I'm in here!", so I entered the room. As soon as she pulled back the... Read More

  1. Visit  stephanie.} profile page
    1
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    Hundreds of times. I am not sure if any survived (and by survived I mean 30 days), maybe one or two over the years. I really don't remember. I never kept track of that sort of thing. Once my shift was over, I forgot everyone.

    I'm not surprised they arrested your brother. In a situation like that the police are in charge, certainly not an off-duty nurse passing by. Sounds as though the situation was far from stable and his impulsive action probably put others in danger; not a good move. The victim was going to die anyway, so he needn't feel anything about it. PTSD would be understandable though, maybe you could suggest he get some counseling.
    Who are you ,or any police officer, to decide someone isn't worth trying to save? Get off your know-it-all high horse and try and remember why most people become nurses- to care for others. Her brother was selfless and I applaud him for that.
    HM-8404 likes this.
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  3. Visit  stephanie.} profile page
    0
    When I was 20 I went through EMT school. On my last ride along I had to do CPR on a 6 month old baby boy. He was dead when we got him, blood had already begun pooling. A few weeks later I got my license and never worked. I was too young and immature to process that experience.
  4. Visit  stephanie.} profile page
    0
    Quote from Calabria

    You're extrapolating too little from my comments, unfortunately (or perhaps I was not clear). The OP's brother, a passerby, was warned not to enter the crime scene by police officers who were securing it. My father is a retired police officer from the Philadelphia area, and I have relatives who work for fire/EMS in Philadelphia; my father's department was trained in first aid (and CPR). Several officers taught BLS, actually. The police are able to provide first aid and CPR if necessary; they don't need a nurse passerby to run through their crime scene, contaminating it to provide aid. It is likely that the police knew something that the OP's brother did not. I understand the desire to help an injured person outside of the workplace, but (like Sionainn said) it needs to be kept in check with keeping oneself and those around you safe.
    Where I live police don't do CPR. It's a matter of location.
  5. Visit  SuzieVN} profile page
    0
    Quote from stephanie.
    Where I live police don't do CPR. It's a matter of location.
    Good point. It appears the cops in Philly don't do CPR, either?
  6. Visit  SuzieVN} profile page
    0
    Quote from stephanie.
    When I was 20 I went through EMT school. On my last ride along I had to do CPR on a 6 month old baby boy. He was dead when we got him, blood had already begun pooling. A few weeks later I got my license and never worked. I was too young and immature to process that experience.
    Wow. What to say. I've never seen a dead baby, and that's a good thing.
  7. Visit  carsm3} profile page
    0
    SuzieVN, so sorry to hear about your brother. I think it takes a special kind of nurse to perform CPR outside of the job because so much could go wrong, especially in a crime scene! Personally, crime scene or not I would be trying to save that persons life regardless of the circumstances.

    Haven't had to do CPR yet. However, I just took a position on the ICU so I'm sure my time is coming.
  8. Visit  TiffyRN} profile page
    0
    I haven't performed CPR like many of the adult ICU/ER nurses out there but in 20 years I've done the compression/ventilation thing a couple dozen times though always in a work scenario. To my knowledge, none of those patients survived more than a week or so afterwards though probably more than 1/2 made it through the initial code.

    A couple of the most memorable for me: My first CPR ever was a patient who had been comatose for over a year and should have never have been coded. His last code (yes people, I do 'em right) was kind of a cluster since 3 or the 4 floor nurses present had never coded a patient before. We coded the patient for 45 mins and never regained a perfusing rhythm. I still remember his full name and salient details of his history.

    The second one was my first neonatal code. I had cared for the little guy off and on for a couple of months and watched him going down, called the code and started compressions. Looking back I was amazed at how naturally I pulled off his clothes, found my landmarks and started in (with good technique according to the debriefing). We coded him for about 45 mins and he did survive the event. A few days later a brain MRI done to evaluate any anoxic damage determined he had vital parts of his brain missing and his parents made the painful decision to withdraw support.

    On the other hand, I have cared for a few adult patients who survived arrests. The save rates are not high, but it does happen. I have cared for dozens of infants that have been resuscitated at some point (including compressions). Whether this is a good thing or not takes years to fully evaluate. I remember another infant that was born at the edge of viability (23 weeks, no one locally admits to resuscitating below 23 weeks) and had scars on her chest from compressions on her jelly-like skin. All her head scans were good and other than a rough start it appeared her only long-term problem was chronic lung disease which meant she would go home on oxygen for a while.
  9. Visit  SwansonRN} profile page
    0
    Only been a nurse for a bit in the ICU, but I've done some chest compressions. I'm really not the best choice for that role unless I'm the first responder. I always have to crawl onto bed with the patient or stand on a chair. Usually we get the men to do it

    The other day I had a surprise vfibber, did a few compressions and then zapped her back into sinus within a few seconds. That was a cool feeling!
  10. Visit  LadyFree28} profile page
    0
    Quote from SuzieVN

    Good point. It appears the cops in Philly don't do CPR, either?
    They do.

    I know officers that were ready to work on me when I had a major medical incident; as well as a 10-yr old boy shot in the head. Their efforts of saving his life was enormous. He was able to graduate high school, in college, has an anti-violence organization...I had the chance to work with him professionally and assist with his anti-violence efforts. His only residual effects are seizures from the bullet.

    As for my incident, they were able to stabilize me while EMS arrived. I was awake, in shock, fought against unconsciousness. They were very prompt in assisting me.
  11. Visit  jrsmrs} profile page
    1
    I'm just under the 1 year mark since I started working. I've not had a chance to do compressions myself, but have been otherwise involved in 2 code situations at work, one of them being my patient who I had just rushed up to ICU cause he was going downhill fast from the moment I got him. STEMI, diabetic, renal, severe PVD, R AKA and gangrenous L foot; hadn't been keeping up his sugars all day apparently, and SBP in the 80s for the most part, according to the report I got at 19:30. By 20:10 I had called our rapid response team on this guy. ICU was full so we had to wait til 22:55 to transfer him after they cleared out a bed (to me, incidentally) with this guy circling the drain the whole time. Portable tele battery died in the elevator on the run up to ICU, tho he was still speaking to us on the way. Ran the whole way and when we plugged him back in, boom! VFib. Unsuccessful code that time.
    I have, however, looked after 2 pts who were successful codes in the past few months. Both made it out of ICU and seemed to be back at baseline for the most part, aside from the broken ribs.
    anotherone likes this.
  12. Visit  BlueDevil,DNP} profile page
    4
    Quote from stephanie.
    Who are you ,or any police officer, to decide someone isn't worth trying to save? Get off your know-it-all high horse and try and remember why most people become nurses- to care for others. Her brother was selfless and I applaud him for that.
    Chill. I do not know how it is you infer that I believed the individual was not "worth trying to save." I never said or implied such. What an odd thing to assume from my comments. Not referring to the scenario in the OP specifically, but generally speaking it simply isn't appropriate to enter an unsecured crime scene against instructions of law enforcement charged with that responsibility. Failing to follow the direction of law enforcement officers in dangerous unsecured situations puts lives at risk: those of the officers as well as any other bystanders, etc. and that is inherently unfair to each of those individuals. There is no judgement of the relative "worth" of any of those persons involved. It is simply a public safety issue. In a crisis where one does not possess all of the facts of a given situation, one follows instructions of the police, period. I am not mounted on a high horse, I'm down here on my own two feet using plain, old fashioned, level headed common sense. Stand down the emotional grandstanding and think logically for a minute and you'll have to concede that I'm right.

    Why anyone becomes a nurse is immaterial to how to go about performing one's work related duties in a responsible manner. And I would submit that the first step in "caring for others" is to try one's level best not to get innocent people hurt or killed unnecessarily, lol.
  13. Visit  SuzieVN} profile page
    0
    Aside from the intermittent hostile comments, really- I'm amazed at the total responses to this post. I will again clarify: My brother, a BSN, long time ICU nurse, did 'not' take in the situation, and make an informed decision to violate a crime scene. He was walking home from work (in Philly-for those of you that have no idea of the risk that entails) at night, turned a corner, saw a man 'down', and rushed to aid the man, having no idea what had happened. It was instinct, fact, not criminal. For those of you who have condemned him again, all I can say it that- what's new? Nurses attack their own. For what reason, who cares, we all know nurses seem to just hate each other. Again- the point of my post was, does CPR work? Hmm. Seems not to in most cases. And don't try it on me!
  14. Visit  NRSKarenRN} profile page
    1
    Closed for Admin Review.
    SuzieVN likes this.


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