Left a job because of bad situation...what to say on application?

  1. 0
    Long story short...

    I left my last job because my DON would not approve my request to refer my home care patient to hospice. The DON stated she needed the money from the case and if she lost that case the company would not keep their numbers up enough to get medicare certified. The patient died four days later. I had to leave. I could not work for a company that didn't respect our patients.

    So...What do I say on my applications as a reason why I left. I can't say anything negative and I don't want to make myself look bad.

    Thank you!!
  2. 8 Comments so far...

  3. 4
    at this level, as someone that interviews many people for different positions, i would have to say that the truth is definitely the best route to go. needless to say, first and foremost answer truthfully while at the same time not talking about the facility or staff in a negative light. of course, your answer should also be based on the real reason you left, but put a positive spin on it. having said that, if you felt under appreciated or your knowledge wasn't considered at your last job, instead of ranting about your overbearing boss and under appreciative facility, you might say that your prior work didn't allow you to grow professionally or intellectually. therefore, always keep in mind that your interviewer is looking for a positive, motivated, hardworking candidate. with that said, no potential employer wants to hear your gripe about a prior boss or talk poorly about a previous employer. lastly, he/she wants to hear about your potential as a superstar at the position you are seeking. wishing you the very best in all of your future endeavors.....aloha~

    aknottedyarn, elprup, frankie,RN, and 1 other like this.
  4. 3
    I have to respectfully disagree that telling the truth is the best thing here. Regardless of whether you had a good reason to leave or not, all sorts of red flags will pop up in the heads of interviewers if you bad mouth your former employer.

    The phrase to use is "It was a nice place, but not a good fit for me." If pressed about why it wasn't a good fit, be general: they didn't have a model of care in place that I agreed with and Im looking for a better fit.

    You had a good reason to leave. Problem is, everyone they interview says they had a good reason to leave their former employer (some are true, some are not). Its not as if people are walking into the interview and admitting "Yeah, Im not there anymore cause they said I was not a team oriented worker so I figured it was time to get outta Dodge."

    So, since everyone claims to have left their former employer for "good reasons", actually having a reason to want to leave doesn't set you apart. What can separate you from the crowd is handling it well, which includes not bad mouthing the former employer. Also, by not getting into mud slinging, you demonstrate that you've truly moved on.

    We all float down here.
    Kran1990, tyvin, and frankie,RN like this.
  5. 0
    I agree with Penny...the thing with a lot of the truth in your specific case is why was it so late to put the patient on hospice? As the hiring person I would think that there was something else going on due to the fact that the patient passed on only 4 days later. Why take someone through that process so late in the game (unless there was something about insurance, family). Did they pass on with dignity? So many questions pop into my head after reading that.
    .
    Be truthful without bashing. I mean you certainly didn't just up and quit due to that one incident did you? If you did then that makes you look unpredictable IMO. The thing is do you think your ex-boss will come out with the hospice thing or what do you think will be said? I know there are all these rules about what can be said and what can't be asked etc..

    Don't burn those bridges. It's never a good idea to blame your ex-employer. Who do you think the potential employer will believe? Then it just turns into drama. Good luck
  6. 0
    When I first saw the title of your post, I was thinking, "Tell the truth" but...in this case, I am not 100% sure. I think probably the best thing to put on applications is something more generic, "looking for a new challenge" It is much easier to say, "not a good fit" than to explain the situation.

    I interviewed for a job while still in my 90 days at a hospital. There were multiple multiple reasons why I wanted to leave, and when asked in my interview, I simply stated, "The hospital does not have a team philosophy- in other words, I do not think it is the best interest of anyone to run a code with one Nurse, the Medic who brought the pt to the facility and a physician." The manager grinned and told me I was hired. BUT...I had been knocking around this area for a long time, and knew she knew about the facility. She told me later that she was impressed with my candor- but even at that moment I felt I was taking a risk. I have to admit, if placed in the same situation again, i might not say those things...
  7. 1
    The company's approach and philosophy regarding patient care was not in keeping with my own, therefore, I gave my notice. My approach is a holistic, whole discipline, and...... (whatever else your own approach may entail).
    Do not talk about the specific patient, or the company in a bad light, just that it was not in keeping to your own nursing practice and philosophy--and a great way to then speak about how you practice, and how it could benefit their patients.
    Esme12 likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from jadelpn
    The company's approach and philosophy regarding patient care was not in keeping with my own, therefore, I gave my notice. My approach is a holistic, whole discipline, and...... (whatever else your own approach may entail).
    Do not talk about the specific patient, or the company in a bad light, just that it was not in keeping to your own nursing practice and philosophy--and a great way to then speak about how you practice, and how it could benefit their patients.
    Excellent advice.
  9. 0
    I say never talk badly about a former employer. It's too small a world - you don't know who they know, etc, etc. "not a good fit" sums it up nicely - leave it at that.
  10. 0
    I used "Lack of clinical infrastructure" -- which was true.

    When I was asked to elaborate on what my day was like, since not many knew anything about hospice, I got bugged out eyes all around. Nothing inflammatory. Just my call hours wigged-out the MDs in room, one even said, "**** no, you gotta be kidding!"


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