Could the reason I got fired from my last job affect becoming a nurse - page 5

Okay...so last year I worked at an assisted living center. I'm young, I was 21 at the time and made a very very very poor choice of being intimate with a fellow co worker while at work. Long story... Read More

  1. by   Lisacar130
    I've never used these before and I can't recommend any particular company, but a quick google search resulted in me finding one of these companies. See link below:

    Job Reference Checking for Job Seekers - CheckMyReference
  2. by   Allie94
    Thank you! I might actually look into paying for it to be checked just to put my mind at ease! Lol.
  3. by   Allie94
    Has any of you ever listed someone who technically wasn't your supervisor as your former supervisor on an application? I have heard people say they used co workers or nurses or their old supervisor to avoid I bad reference. Isn't that highly wrong and could result in legal trouble? There's one supervisor I don't believe will give me a good review and I almost considered writing another supervisor down who technically wasn't mine and had no authority to hire or fire. I‘m in contact with that supervisor, but would that be wrong?
  4. by   chare
    Yes, it would be. And, if if you do this and the future employer discovers that you were less than completely honest on your application, this could lead to your job offer being rescinded, or immediate terminatiin if you have started your employment.
  5. by   Allie94
    I'm getting ready to start nursing school and I'll graduate in 2019. In 2016 I worked at an assisted living facility for 6 months. I was terminated and chances are I'm not eligible for rehire. I'm worried that when I graduate nursing school and start applying for RN positions I won't get anything due to a possible bad reference. I currently have a job and have been here for a year and I know I'll get a great reference from them! I'm just worried that the job I got fired from will cost me an RN position.
  6. by   traumaRUs
    Merged threads
  7. by   Crush
    Quote from Allie94
    Has any of you ever listed someone who technically wasn't your supervisor as your former supervisor on an application? I have heard people say they used co workers or nurses or their old supervisor to avoid I bad reference. Isn't that highly wrong and could result in legal trouble? There's one supervisor I don't believe will give me a good review and I almost considered writing another supervisor down who technically wasn't mine and had no authority to hire or fire. I‘m in contact with that supervisor, but would that be wrong?
    Yes, that is very wrong, illegal and should not even be considered.
  8. by   KelRN215
    Quote from Allie94
    Has any of you ever listed someone who technically wasn't your supervisor as your former supervisor on an application? I have heard people say they used co workers or nurses or their old supervisor to avoid I bad reference. Isn't that highly wrong and could result in legal trouble? There's one supervisor I don't believe will give me a good review and I almost considered writing another supervisor down who technically wasn't mine and had no authority to hire or fire. I‘m in contact with that supervisor, but would that be wrong?
    You cannot lie and list someone who isn't your supervisor as your supervisor.

    You can give whomever you please as a reference. Whether or not the reference is acceptable to the prospective employer is up to them. My references when I was a new grad were past clinical instructors and the mother of a child with a brain tumor who I had worked with in a volunteer capacity (the position I was applying for was pedi neuro-onc). Supervisors at past jobs (substitute teaching at my mother's school, bus monitoring, temping for the town or my father's friend the accountant) wouldn't have had anything relevant to nursing to offer for a reference.

    I have never used my nurse manager from my inpatient job as a reference. When I was leaving that job, I used charge nurses as references. I didn't lie and say they were my supervisor, I said they were charge nurses and the jobs I was applying to felt this was sufficient.

    The last time I was applying for jobs, I don't even remember who I used. It was not a supervisor at the job I was leaving since, in 3 years, I had 5 different branch managers and at points where that position was vacant, reported directly to the clinical director in another location, so there was no one consistent I could use. Plus, I generally don't think it wise to tip off my current position that I am looking elsewhere. I know the job I got didn't actually check the references I listed in the online application because when they were going through some kind of audit, they realized they didn't have any documented references and called me and asked who they should list, haha.
  9. by   Lisacar130
    I wouldn't have someone pose as an old manager because when they do a reference check they will call the NH directly either way, and could easily figure out that the name you gave them was not actually ever a manager. Even if you say they no longer work there, they will call the NH anyway in addition to whatever number you give them for the old manager. If you give them a friend's number as the NH's number, they would easily figure that out. NH phone numbers are easy to google and I'm pretty sure that would be found out. I'm pretty sure you would not get into any legal trouble, but you would have any job offer rescinded and if that organization is affiliated with other healthcare organizations, you could get blacklisted for that.
  10. by   Lisacar130
    Your employment history stays at the NH under your employee file, and that is what the reference check will be after, and that is why they will always call the NH directly. Managers come and go.
  11. by   caliotter3
    Who you list as your reference is your choice. Don't confuse that choice with the listing of former supervisors for each job entry. When they call to check with the employers, they might ask for the supervisor of the unit anyway. When they call your references, they know that they are going to talk to someone of your choosing. You can't 'choose' who the supervisor of the unit is going to be at the time the call is made. Don't overthink all of this.
  12. by   Daisy Joyce
    Why can't I find a job where I have that much downtime?
  13. by   FullGlass
    Quote from Allie94
    It happened. But the co worker didn't see actual intercourse. Therefore she'd be lying as well. Sure, she saw the putting of the shirts back on and of course that gave it away but to say she saw us in the act would be a LIE.
    I think you should consider a legal career! (Based on the comment above)

close