From the Other Side of the Bed Rails - When the Nurse Becomes the Patient From the Other Side of the Bed Rails - When the Nurse Becomes the Patient - pg.8 | allnurses

From the Other Side of the Bed Rails - When the Nurse Becomes the Patient - page 9

I had an interesting experience today. I walked into a hematology/oncology office ......... but this time as the patient. It’s strange how much different it feels when you, the nurse, suddenly... Read More

  1. Visit  NursesRmofun profile page
    #91 1
    Just realized this is an old thread...but hope all is well, PatientTnButterfly
  2. Visit  tnbutterfly profile page
    #92 0
    Quote from NursesRmofun
    Just realized this is an old thread...but hope all is well, PatientTnButterfly
    Thanks for your concern. I am fine.
  3. Visit  BeenThere2012 profile page
    #93 2
    I realize this is an old post, but it caught my attention, so I hope others are still reading..
    I have been a nurse many years and a patient several times. Each and every time I was a patient, I learned something VERY important to add or take away from my practice. First, I will ditto all who have said the caring and compassion given makes a world of difference. Not just in the moment, but it also influences the healing over the long run. A patient who feels cared about and has needs attended to will be calmer and heal much better than one who is uncomfortable or fearful. I'll just make a short list from here...

    Please don't burst into the room of a sleeping patient and abruptly switch on the light. In general, try to wake a patient gently before you plow in to start a procedure.

    When a patient is squirming around in their bed and unable to communicate (sedated, intubated, etc...), make sure they aren't lying on a needle cap or have an itchy rash on their back.

    Just because a patient is sedated, doesn't mean their pain is under control.

    I once had a nurse lean over gently and whisper in my ear that everything is going to be all right. I can't tell you what that meant to me and how beautiful that was. It is the small things sometimes that make the world of difference. Bless all nurses who are kind and gentle.
  4. Visit  tnbutterfly profile page
    #94 1
    Quote from BeenThere2012
    I realize this is an old post, but it caught my attention, so I hope others are still reading..
    I have been a nurse many years and a patient several times. Each and every time I was a patient, I learned something VERY important to add or take away from my practice. First, I will ditto all who have said the caring and compassion given makes a world of difference. Not just in the moment, but it also influences the healing over the long run. A patient who feels cared about and has needs attended to will be calmer and heal much better than one who is uncomfortable or fearful. I'll just make a short list from here...

    Please don't burst into the room of a sleeping patient and abruptly switch on the light. In general, try to wake a patient gently before you plow in to start a procedure.

    When a patient is squirming around in their bed and unable to communicate (sedated, intubated, etc...), make sure they aren't lying on a needle cap or have an itchy rash on their back.

    Just because a patient is sedated, doesn't mean their pain is under control.

    I once had a nurse lean over gently and whisper in my ear that everything is going to be all right. I can't tell you what that meant to me and how beautiful that was. It is the small things sometimes that make the world of difference. Bless all nurses who are kind and gentle.
    Thank you for these great suggestions. It's sometimes the small things we do with a compassionate heart that can have the greatest impact.

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