My Nursing License Is At Risk - Or Is It? - page 3

by TheCommuter 38,169 Views | 68 Comments Senior Moderator

I often listen as certain coworkers, usually the nurses with zero to two years of experience, chime about the dangers to their hard-earned nursing licenses. 的知 putting my license on the line by dealing with that difficult... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from TheCommuter
    By the way, the following is a link to the recent disciplinary action page on the BON website for the state where I live. Just click on any license number to read the stories that led up to disciplinary action being taken against the licensee (nurse).

    https://www.bon.state.tx.us/discipli...entaction.html
    Reading through the remedial education, deferred postings is cringe-worthy to me. Proof that you can get hauled in front of the BoN for simple mistakes in med administration/nursing judgment, even if you're basically found not guilty. That's still time, money, and god-knows-what-sort-of-behind-the-back-gossip for the nurse involved.
  2. 2
    This is an interesting article, because (as PP have said) those of us still in school and newly out of school have heard over and over again about the numerous risks to our license.

    I took a cursory glance at the public records of license revocations in my state of California, for the month of September 2012. 2/3 are for narcotics use or diversion. One RN turned out to be a pedophile (off the clock) and was sent to jail. One home health RN was found guilty of Medicare Fraud. One RN was convicted by a criminal court for battery on a patient as a result of unwanted touching. He was acquitted of sexual assault. The BON revoked his license for the battery conviction.

    I found one that was for negligence... however this particular nurse had 7 documented instances of negligence over a 2 year period, at 2 different employers, both of whom terminated her and reported her to the BON. Some of her issues included giving insulin without an order, failing to take a blood glucose level prior to giving insulin, falsifying patient records, and many other issues. I have to admit, my favorite part is that she seems to have taken a patient medical record from the facility, altered it, and submitted it directly to the BON at her hearing as part of her defense. It was then determined that she did not have the patient's consent to disclose their records (so an additional HIPPA violation), plus the BON determined she falsified information in it.

    That's all for September 2012. It does seem that you need to do/not do something VERY serious to lose your license, and in most instances a pattern of behavior is established, not just a one time offense. Also, it's worth noting that most of the narcotics related offenders were put on probation first, and continued to test positive for narcotics and so were now finally losing their licenses.
    lilangel6828 and sapphire18 like this.
  3. 3
    Quote from VICEDRN
    I'll bite...

    So your theory is that because the nurses that you know that got their licenses revoked all did something illegal/ very serious that all nurses who have their licenses revoked did something implicitly illegal and/or very serious?

    Think that logic is a little faulty there sister!
    Um, not really. The point is that this is the level of offense that gets your license jeopardized, not mouthing off to the staffing clerk when you refuse to work extra or doing a late med pass. And yes, it does take something illegal or very serious to have your license acted upon. I think since most of them are diversion-related that's the easiest (and most instructive) thing for most of us to cite, but there are clearly others.
    Last edit by GrnTea on Nov 1, '12
  4. 0
    Quote from dirtyhippiegirl
    Reading through the remedial education, deferred postings is cringe-worthy to me. Proof that you can get hauled in front of the BoN for simple mistakes in med administration/nursing judgment, even if you're basically found not guilty. That's still time, money, and god-knows-what-sort-of-behind-the-back-gossip for the nurse involved.
    I agree, it is really scary.
  5. 1
    Thanks for posting this. I am a new-ish nurse and am constantly worried about "losing my license." I'm glad to hear that it's more major infractions.
    spiderslap likes this.
  6. 0
    Cauliflower, those major infractions can be committed quite easily. If you accept an assignment with insufficient staffing, and you cannot provide safe care to your patients, and you do not request more help and insist that you receive it, and there is a bad patient outcome (as would have likely happened to my family member with acute diarrhea where the nurse came in to hang fluids and antibiotics, and the aide came in to take vital signs, and no-one had time to assist a patient having frequent diarrhea), had I not been there to give the care myself my family member with sepsis and acute renal failure would likely have suffered a very bad outcome. And yes, I would have held someone accountable for insufficient staffing and a breach in the standard of care if I found out that my family member suffered unduly and deteriorated partly due to the fact that their acute diarrhea was not attended to properly when they were struggling to cope with sepsis and kidney failure.
  7. 0
    I knew one nurse who lost her license...and yup..it was because of stealing methadone(I used to work at a meth clinic.) So out of all the nurses I have worked with..I only knew one who got her license taken away. Now being fired? I've seen a few nurses fired. AT my meth clinic, 3 med errors and you are out of a job. But license still intact.
  8. 1
    I know a nurse who had sex with a patient and all she got was a Decree of Censure.
    rammstein likes this.
  9. 2
    Quote from monkeybug
    What the young nurses should be worried about is the status of their personal malpractice insurance. You are much more likely to be sued for something that stems from a med error or understaffing than you are to have your license revoked. The BON doesn't worry me too much (not dealing or diverting! ) but trial attorneys worry me plenty. In our state the bar is set pretty high for even getting a med mal case into court, but who wants to deal with any part of a lawsuit, even if it's eventually dismissed?
    It is unlikely that a nurse would get sued AT ALL.

    That is why I can get $2 million in coverage for $158 per year and a doctor has to pay thousands.

    That is because statistically, they get sued and we don't.

    I am not saying nurses never get sued, I am just saying that if we got sued anywhere NEAR as often as physicians did, our malpractice insurance would be so high we couldn't afford to buy it.
    Not_A_Hat_Person and annlewis like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from musingmom
    This is an interesting article, because (as PP have said) those of us still in school and newly out of school have heard over and over again about the numerous risks to our license.

    I took a cursory glance at the public records of license revocations in my state of California, for the month of September 2012. 2/3 are for narcotics use or diversion. One RN turned out to be a pedophile (off the clock) and was sent to jail. One home health RN was found guilty of Medicare Fraud. One RN was convicted by a criminal court for battery on a patient as a result of unwanted touching. He was acquitted of sexual assault. The BON revoked his license for the battery conviction.

    I found one that was for negligence... however this particular nurse had 7 documented instances of negligence over a 2 year period, at 2 different employers, both of whom terminated her and reported her to the BON. Some of her issues included giving insulin without an order, failing to take a blood glucose level prior to giving insulin, falsifying patient records, and many other issues. I have to admit, my favorite part is that she seems to have taken a patient medical record from the facility, altered it, and submitted it directly to the BON at her hearing as part of her defense. It was then determined that she did not have the patient's consent to disclose their records (so an additional HIPPA violation), plus the BON determined she falsified information in it.

    That's all for September 2012. It does seem that you need to do/not do something VERY serious to lose your license, and in most instances a pattern of behavior is established, not just a one time offense. Also, it's worth noting that most of the narcotics related offenders were put on probation first, and continued to test positive for narcotics and so were now finally losing their licenses.
    Yeah, good thing they didn't kill anyone


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