My Nursing License Is At Risk - Or Is It? - page 3

I often listen as certain coworkers, usually the nurses with zero to two years of experience, chime about the dangers to their hard-earned nursing licenses. "I'm putting my license on the line by... Read More

  1. Visit  historylovinglpn} profile page
    0
    I knew one nurse who lost her license...and yup..it was because of stealing methadone(I used to work at a meth clinic.) So out of all the nurses I have worked with..I only knew one who got her license taken away. Now being fired? I've seen a few nurses fired. AT my meth clinic, 3 med errors and you are out of a job. But license still intact.
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  3. Visit  lovingtheunloved} profile page
    1
    I know a nurse who had sex with a patient and all she got was a Decree of Censure.
    rammstein likes this.
  4. Visit  Jory} profile page
    2
    Quote from monkeybug
    What the young nurses should be worried about is the status of their personal malpractice insurance. You are much more likely to be sued for something that stems from a med error or understaffing than you are to have your license revoked. The BON doesn't worry me too much (not dealing or diverting! ) but trial attorneys worry me plenty. In our state the bar is set pretty high for even getting a med mal case into court, but who wants to deal with any part of a lawsuit, even if it's eventually dismissed?
    It is unlikely that a nurse would get sued AT ALL.

    That is why I can get $2 million in coverage for $158 per year and a doctor has to pay thousands.

    That is because statistically, they get sued and we don't.

    I am not saying nurses never get sued, I am just saying that if we got sued anywhere NEAR as often as physicians did, our malpractice insurance would be so high we couldn't afford to buy it.
    Not_A_Hat_Person and annlewis like this.
  5. Visit  Jory} profile page
    0
    Quote from musingmom
    This is an interesting article, because (as PP have said) those of us still in school and newly out of school have heard over and over again about the numerous risks to our license.

    I took a cursory glance at the public records of license revocations in my state of California, for the month of September 2012. 2/3 are for narcotics use or diversion. One RN turned out to be a pedophile (off the clock) and was sent to jail. One home health RN was found guilty of Medicare Fraud. One RN was convicted by a criminal court for battery on a patient as a result of unwanted touching. He was acquitted of sexual assault. The BON revoked his license for the battery conviction.

    I found one that was for negligence... however this particular nurse had 7 documented instances of negligence over a 2 year period, at 2 different employers, both of whom terminated her and reported her to the BON. Some of her issues included giving insulin without an order, failing to take a blood glucose level prior to giving insulin, falsifying patient records, and many other issues. I have to admit, my favorite part is that she seems to have taken a patient medical record from the facility, altered it, and submitted it directly to the BON at her hearing as part of her defense. It was then determined that she did not have the patient's consent to disclose their records (so an additional HIPPA violation), plus the BON determined she falsified information in it.

    That's all for September 2012. It does seem that you need to do/not do something VERY serious to lose your license, and in most instances a pattern of behavior is established, not just a one time offense. Also, it's worth noting that most of the narcotics related offenders were put on probation first, and continued to test positive for narcotics and so were now finally losing their licenses.
    Yeah, good thing they didn't kill anyone
  6. Visit  joanna_rn} profile page
    0
    I'm having difficulty finding the notice of discplinary for Washington state. Can anyone provide a link? It would be MUCH appreciated.
  7. Visit  pikehm} profile page
    1
    My license is being investigated because I did not straight cath a patient in a timely manner. The state says I violated the patient protection act. When I spoke to the investigator, I admitted that I should have handled the situation differently and apologized. I lost my job due to this and was having a difficult personal life, too. Now I am trying to find a new job and no one will hire me because of the open complaint on my license. I find this article reassuring but I am still very nervous and frustrated. I know I screwed up but I need a job. Just a reminder to be careful...even smaller things can cause a huge problem in your life.
    roughmatch likes this.
  8. Visit  mizaf} profile page
    0
    I agree with turnforthenrseRN and with everyone else. In school especially the instructors are always talking about "loosing your license." So, new nurses including myself get fearful of that, which is good to a certain point but you can't go through nursing scared of that. I have seen that a lot of the nurses that get their licenses revoked are the ones stealing narcotics and just don't have their life on the right track.
  9. Visit  TheCommuter} profile page
    3
    Quote from joanna_rn
    I'm having difficulty finding the notice of discplinary for Washington state. Can anyone provide a link? It would be MUCH appreciated.
    Not all state BON websites provide public notices of disciplinary action. If you cannot locate any pages of disciplinary action on your state BON's website, you will have to send a letter to the BON to request that they send this information to you.
    Quote from pikehm
    My license is being investigated because I did not straight cath a patient in a timely manner. The state says I violated the patient protection act. When I spoke to the investigator, I admitted that I should have handled the situation differently and apologized.
    Personally, I would try to avoid speaking to a state investigator without an attorney present because they are not exactly the nurse's friend in situations where allegations are made. I wish you the best of luck.
    roughmatch, GrnTea, and SummitRN like this.
  10. Visit  tacomaster} profile page
    0
    Thanks for posting that link. I always hear stories about nurses losing their licenses and I'm always in fear.
  11. Visit  CT Pixie} profile page
    0
    I personally know at least half a dozen nurses (LPN and RN) who lost their licenses due to narcotic abuse/use/diversion in the last 2 or 3 years. There were several more I didn't know personally but knew of who lost their licenses for drugs. The only one I know of that didn't lose it due to drugs was one I went to high school with one who lost her license due to physical, mental and verbal abuse of the quad patient that she was the home care nurse for.

    On occasion I look through my state's disciplinary minutes and more ofthen than not its all drug and/or ETOH related.
  12. Visit  ThinkAgain} profile page
    1
    All stories are the same and all involve nursing homes... hm
    bleverett likes this.
  13. Visit  TheCommuter} profile page
    0
    Quote from ThinkAgain
    The stories are all the same and all involve nursing homes... hm
    The stories are not quite the same. . .

    All of the stories involve nursing homes because the first four years of my short nursing career (2006 to 2010) had been spent working in nursing homes. Therefore, almost all of the nurses with whom I had been acquainted were/are working in LTC.

    If I had spent those years in another type of setting (telemetry, psych, ambulatory surgery, etc.), my true stories would most likely involve former coworkers from those specialties.
  14. Visit  ThePrincessBride} profile page
    1
    Quote from Jory
    It is unlikely that a nurse would get sued AT ALL.

    That is why I can get $2 million in coverage for $158 per year and a doctor has to pay thousands.

    That is because statistically, they get sued and we don't.

    I am not saying nurses never get sued, I am just saying that if we got sued anywhere NEAR as often as physicians did, our malpractice insurance would be so high we couldn't afford to buy it.
    Only 158 dollars per year?

    You'd have to be a foolish or in a terrible financial constraints to NOT have malpractice insurance at that rate!
    annlewis likes this.


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