My Nursing License Is At Risk - Or Is It? - page 2

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

31,064 Visits | 68 Comments

I often listen as certain coworkers, usually the nurses with zero to two years of experience, chime about the dangers to their hard-earned nursing licenses. 的知 putting my license on the line by dealing with that difficult... Read More


  1. 7
    I am a brand new Nurse orienting at my first job in LTC. When we were in school I think they put a fear in us about losing our licenses over trivial matters. Yes, my friends and I have discussed this possiblity since we graduated and many of us are working in LTC. I have worried about what if someone goes downhill or I miss something when I have 25-30 residents? Last week one of my residents was sent out to hospital about 6 hours after my shift. I worried about it because it was my very first day caring for her, I never saw anything that alarmed me or would make me call the Doctor. These are situations that I worry about losing my license over in LTC. We are not in a hospital enviroment and these residents are not all Q shift charting (Thank God!) and they do not and should not need a physical assessment on a daily basis. Im actually a little bit relieved to hear this discussion. The way we heard it in school from our instructors made us feel our license is constantly at risk and its very stressful to say the least.
  2. 12
    "Abandon all hope ye who enter here"

    LTC will throw you under the bus just to keep the beds full and the bucks rolling in.
    Dear BON, our LTC facility's pish-poor staffing, impossible assignments, 20:1- pt: nurse ratios, didn't have anything to do with Mr Xs death, it is solely the nurse who is to blame.

    Hogwash.
    Last edit by jadedzombienurse on Nov 1, '12 : Reason: spacing
  3. 11
    What the young nurses should be worried about is the status of their personal malpractice insurance. You are much more likely to be sued for something that stems from a med error or understaffing than you are to have your license revoked. The BON doesn't worry me too much (not dealing or diverting! ) but trial attorneys worry me plenty. In our state the bar is set pretty high for even getting a med mal case into court, but who wants to deal with any part of a lawsuit, even if it's eventually dismissed?
  4. 5
    monkeybug said what I was just thinking. My malpractice policy exclusions include: Injury that a reasonable person would expect, along with criminal acts. As nurses we are held to the "reasonable nurse" standard. So my understanding is that if I am determined to be responsible for my patient's injury because of my breach of the Standards of Care, then my malpractice policy exclusions are invoked. I am familiar with the Nurse Practice Act, standards of practice, HIPAA, Nurse's Code of Ethics, Patient's Bill of Rights, and more, including risk management information for practicing nurses provided by my malpractice insurer. All of this is a lot of reading. The difficulty as I see it is that employers sometimes make it very difficult for nurses to practice safely and to fulfill their legal requirements, eg. as monkeybug mentioned, understaffing. A personal example is lack of support staff to assist with a family member with acute diarrhea (yes, as family I was very glad to help, but no further staff were provided). As I understand it, one's legal duty as a nurse in these situations is to fill out an incident report, and report the situation to their manager explaining why the staffing is insufficient to meet their patient's needs, and request more help. The problem, as I see it, is often having to do these things in order to be able to give safe care. The nurse is often put in these highly risky situations by their employers, where the patient's safety is risked and the nurse's license (along with their finances and future ability to support their family) is put at risk through the risk of poor patient outcomes that invite malpractice claims.

    If one has not already done so, I recommend reading risk management information provided by one's malpractice insurer, and learning what actions one can take to protect oneself. Some of the case studies where legal judgements have found against the nurses are quite frightening.

    I believe these situations are of much greater real risk to the nurse than the ever present risk that we may be reported to the BON.
    roughmatch, merlee, msancheeze, and 2 others like this.
  5. 3
    Wow, that's a great reminder to pay back those loans!!


    Quote from dudette10
    I looked over my state's report for September. Here's the breakdown.

    Documentation re: patient care and policies (5): 5 reprimands

    Drugs (6): 4 indefinite suspensions, 1 indefinite probation, and 1 refusal to renew

    Failure to Report (6): 1 reprimand for false information on application, 1 fine for failure to report another state's disciplinary action, 1 reprimand for failure to report termination and unprofessional conduct, 1 indefinite suspension and 1 reprimand for late reporting of felony convictions, 1 indefinite probation for being audited w/ no CEs

    Actual Patient Care (1): 1 reprimand for failing to notify physician of a change in patient status

    And, drumroll please...

    THIRTY refusals to renew and FOUR indefinite probations for defaults on student loans
    GrnTea, dudette10, and Fiveten like this.
  6. 1
    There's no need to be hostile. I can tell you from looking up other nurses licenses in my state that most revocations are narcotic-abuse related. Mistakes in nursing judgement happen, and these may result in losing a job or reprimands. Revocation is the last straw.
    GrnTea likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Well, I'll bite back because I'm not your sister and that's not my theory. . .Anyhow, it would be nice if the nurse who has lost his/her license for dealings with difficult families, short staffing in nursing homes, or giving meds late would come forward and share his/her story. However, I kinda suspect that nurses who lose their licenses for minor issues are rare. My point is that the vast majority of license revocations in my state of residence occur due to issues with impairment or diversion. I regularly read the disciplinary web pages on the website of my state's BON.
    Noted that you don't disagree that you can lose your license for something other than narcotics abuse and criminal activity. Further, the vast majority is not all license revocations.I agree with the theme that is developing on the thread. While license revocations are rare, it is not difficult to imagine being in a indefensible situation when one has too many patients on one shift or does not give needed care. Suspensions and lawsuits are equally scary and impact the ability to collect pay checks profoundly.
  8. 0
    10 Ways to Lose Your Nursing License - Nursing Link

    "9. Patient Abuse and Neglect

    Sadly, this is quite obvious and, even worse, happens more often than we’d like to admit. Patient neglect and abuse can happen because a nurse is intentionally causing pain and/or suffering, or because of a simple mistake because a nurse is over-worked or has too many patients. One of the most serious offenses, patient neglect and abuses affects more than just the nurse, and even more than just the patient. The patient’s friends and family must also suffer alongside him/her, making this grave offense even worse.
    Unfortunately, this happens all too often. Many times, a nurse doesn’t neglect a patient on purpose, but her forgetfulness can cause more damage than imagined and result in the loss of her license."
  9. 1
    Quote from TheCommuter
    By the way, the following is a link to the recent disciplinary action page on the BON website for the state where I live. Just click on any license number to read the stories that led up to disciplinary action being taken against the licensee (nurse).

    https://www.bon.state.tx.us/discipli...entaction.html
    Thank you for sharing this. :-)
    annlewis likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Well, I'll bite back because I'm not your sister and that's not my theory. . .

    Anyhow, it would be nice if the nurse who has lost his/her license for dealings with difficult families, short staffing in nursing homes, or giving meds late would come forward and share his/her story. However, I kinda suspect that nurses who lose their licenses for minor issues are rare.

    My point is that the vast majority of license revocations in my state of residence occur due to issues with impairment or diversion. I regularly read the disciplinary web pages on the website of my state's BON.
    Do you think for the minor stuff (compared with narcotics stuff) like giving a med late or staffing issues, that the nurse loses her job, not her license first?

    And the narcotics stuff leads to a revoked license?


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