Minor things people get fired/wrote up over,,,give examples.

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    I just read a post about an RT who was fired for handing a patient some cough medicine on behalf of an RN who asked them to hand it to them, I guess the RT was working outside of their scope,,but that was pretty minor... Also, someone told me to never do vitals out in the hallway where everyone can see due to privacy. It would be easy to get tricked into or pressured into doing stuff like that.

    What are some other things that one may find minor or even tricked into that you can get in trouble for?

    Thanks to anyone who post!
    FlorenceNtheMachine likes this.
  2. 44 Comments so far...

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    My coworker whom is a CNA, got yelled at for not closing the door and or the privacy curtain when changing/putting resident to bed after lunch. Another CNA got in trouble for giving a resident a snack in the middle of the hallway. Must be something going on, I am glad I work once a month.
  4. 1
    LTC:
    *seen an RPN written up for giving eye gtts in the hallway

    Hospital:
    *My preceptor got a talking to because I had to cut open a gown, and then I threw it out (2 IVs on from OR and I needed to change the gown)
    *RN written up for "too many sick days" - she had a Dr's note.
    DeLanaHarvickWannabe likes this.
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    Well in the first posters instance thats a valid reason for a write up, RT should not be giving medications outside their scope. In the second instance well people get consoled all the time for minor things. Beyond that problem employees, ones who have a consistent track record of issues one might find even a minor issue to "write them up" over as long as it can be further documented per a facilities policies in order to move them along the continuum towards termination.

    To reply to Angelic's post- most places have attendance policies that are cut and dried, drs note or no. I know mine give you so many days before you get a verbal and then written action- with policies in place for long term illness- this being more than 3 shifts of work.
    psu_213 likes this.
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    Giving a co-worker a Motrin or Tylenol from their bag.

    Even though it's OTC medication brought from home
    they were "dispensing" medication w/o a doctor's order.
    canoehead, MaryAnn_RN, ChristineN, and 5 others like this.
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    Getting called in to find out they are being laid off when there were clearly employees who deserved to be fired long before the layoffs were announced. Many employees talked about this one.
    Orange Tree and netglow like this.
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    Quote from northmississippi
    ... Also, someone told me to never do vitals out in the hallway where everyone can see due to privacy. It would be easy to get tricked into or pressured into doing stuff like that.

    What are some other things that one may find minor or even tricked into that you can get in trouble for?

    Thanks to anyone who post!

    Eek. A few months ago, I had a patient who was a regular and a favorite, a chronic CHF-er, who stood by me in the hallway anytime I sat down to chart. He was mentally challenged and loved by the entire staff, and this particular evening, he was so upset and agitated because he wanted to go home and sleep in his own bed... He said he was afraid he was going to die there in the hospital. He didn't want to go back into his room and so I took his BP, etc., right there in the hall, while I was talking to him and trying to calm him down. I'd been a nurse less than a year and I never dreamed it was something I could get in trouble over. I'm so glad, though, that I didn't contribute to his distress. He died early the next morning.

    That said, I've seen folks fired over seemingly silly, minor things and then others not get fired over things that seemed huge to me (screaming profanity at the nurse's station, receiving multiple patient complaints, fist-fighting in a patients' room ...) I think it has a lot to do with hospital politics.
    Last edit by DroogieRN on Jun 16, '11 : Reason: Spelling
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    Quote from rjflyn
    To reply to Angelic's post- most places have attendance policies that are cut and dried, drs note or no. I know mine give you so many days before you get a verbal and then written action- with policies in place for long term illness- this being more than 3 shifts of work.
    The nurse I had mentioned worked 2 jobs. One at the facility I work, and one at another facility. The other facility let her go. She still has employment at the facility I work at. The DON said the virus was specific enough and rare enough that with her Dr note she was allowed the week off to recover.

    I know attendance policies can be cut and dry, but where do management draw the line? My DOC was admitted to a hospital for 3 weeks. She still had her job waiting when she came back. (Can't remember why she was admitted. 30 years old and complications with diabetes I think).
  10. 16
    Quote from EmergencyNrse
    Giving a co-worker a Motrin or Tylenol from their bag.

    Even though it's OTC medication brought from home
    they were "dispensing" medication w/o a doctor's order.
    Good Grief.
    ChristaRN, mani3433, pedicurn, and 13 others like this.
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    It seems to me, about 99% of time, when someone is fired for a "minor" offense, there is a lot more to the story than what that person reveals. Some examples:

    1. A former coworker said to me "yeah, and they fired me for attendance right after I had been in the hosptial for 3 days with abnormall large ["female"] bleeding." Heard from another friend who I used to work with at this facility: since I had left this person who was fired called off many, many times and gave no doctors' notes, etc. She was put on a "zero tolerace" policy for her call-offs. Even though her last call off was a "real" one, she violated the policy she agreed to follow.

    2. A coworker was fired after she made a rude comment to a fellow nurse. This fellow nurse said "It is really warm in here...I'm sweating like crazy." The soon-to-be fired coworker said (basically in jest) "yeah, I wasn't going to say anything, but you really do smell bad." The nurse who made the first comment went to HR. Other nurse was fired. Rude comment, but probably not an offense over which someone would get fired. Well, as it turns out, this nurse had several run-ins with coworkers before, and had been taken to HR over those incidents. She also was on a zero tolerance policy. People looking just at this one situation thought it was totally unfair for her to be let go. Those of us who knew the situation were not suprised (and not sorry) that she was let go.

    I could go on, but I think you get the idea. Anyway, tough to judge these situation without knowing the entire backstory.
    Altra, Gold_SJ, Orange Tree, and 10 others like this.


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