Blue or white collar?

  1. Are nurses considered blue collar or white collar workers? My co-workers and I were having this conversation and there was no consensus.

    p.s. I realize this has been asked before, but I thought I'd start a newer thread.
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  2. Poll: What "collar" are nurses considered?

    • White

      23.68% 27
    • Blue

      46.49% 53
    • Neither

      29.82% 34
    114 Votes
  3. 89 Comments

  4. by   grownuprosie
    merriam-webster says nurses are blue collar. however, i think people have different things they believe these terms mean which would explain the disagreement you had. how did they define the terms?

    [color=#7b7b7b]definition of blue-collar


    1
    : of, relating to, or constituting the class of wage earners whose duties call for the wearing of work clothes or protective clothing-compare white-collar

    definition of white-collar

    : of, relating to, or constituting the class of salaried employees whose duties do not call for the wearing of work clothes or protective clothing-compare blue-collar



    Last edit by grownuprosie on May 21, '12 : Reason: addition
  5. by   Lynx25
    All of my collars are V-neck..

    I think we are more blue-collar than anything. When I think of white collar, I think of office jobs.
  6. by   BlueDevil,DNP
    Nurses are blue collar paraprofessionals. White collar = professionals.
  7. by   Hygiene Queen
    No shame in blue collar.

    When I hear that term, I think "hard work" and I'm proud of that.
  8. by   ebear
    Blue collar with white trim.
  9. by   GitanoRN
    half & half
  10. by   Mulan
    ..

    pink
  11. by   blondy2061h
    To BlueDevil- The definition of a paraprofessional is someone who assists a professional but doesn't have a professional license themselves. I both do not assist anyone and have a license, in fact, I even work with nurse's aids who assist me. Therefore, I am a professional. A paraprofessional would be like a CNA, classroom aid, or a dental assistant.
  12. by   grownuprosie
    For those voting, can you explain *your* definition of Blue collar and White collar?
  13. by   Do-over
    I get paid by the hour, and wear my name on my shirt (or badge, anyway). I clean up nasty, nasty things. I work nights, weekends and holidays. I am a blue-collar worker. And I have no issue with that label. I don't consider what I do a "profession" I consider it a "skilled-trade" and I am finally feeling like a journeyman (or journeywoman, I suppose).

    I wouldn't say that ALL nurses are blue-collar though. Professors, manglement, researchers, etc. I would say are white-collar.
  14. by   RNperdiem
    The old definitions of blue and white collar belong to another era and don't describe the modern workforce very well.
    You could ask if nurses tend to be middle class or working class people.
    I have worked with nurses from working class backgrounds who were the first in their families to get a college education. I work with middle class people and the occasional nurse married to a high earner who works to afford "extras". The class spectrum you see depends on the demographics of where you live. I live in an upscale area where most nurses are middle class.
    You could ask if nursing is a job or a career.
    I work with "job" nurses who work their 12 hours and see nursing as a job. There are also "career" nurses who leave for anesthesia school or go on for their masters or NP, get CCRN certified, and serve on the hospital committies.
  15. by   Esme12
    [color=#7b7b7b]definition of blue-collar
    : of, relating to, or constituting the class of wage earners whose duties call for the wearing of work clothes or protective clothing-compare white-collar

    definition of white-collar of, relating to, or constituting the class of salaried employees whose duties do not call for the wearing of work clothes or protective clothing-compare blue-collar


    a college educated version of both......50/50

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