Are nurses forced to assist abortions? - page 6

by lookingintoRN

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Hello, I'm looking into a career as an RN and I am just curious - Are nurses forced to assist abortions? I've heard recently of several nurses being forced to assist or they lose their job. Is this the case with most hospitals?... Read More


  1. 7
    It's easy...don't work in areas where that might be an issue.
    Or, request a different assignment.
    Or select an employer that does not provide that service.
    Or, consider why this is an issue for you now when you haven't even graduated from nursing school.
    KelRN215, Anonymous865, BrandonLPN, and 4 others like this.
  2. 6
    Tewdles: Isn't it pathetic that we have to keep repeating the same mantra over and over. I wish I could pick and choose which cases I have to do. If you don't want to do abortions, go into retail. Abortions is only one of the repugnant procedures we have to do - I repeat for the high schooler - ONLY ONE OF THE REPUGNANT THINGS WE HAVE TO DO. I'm wise enough to know that I never know what troubles patients bring to us and in the few minutes I have to spend with them, I don't judge.
    BrnEyedGirl, KelRN215, Anonymous865, and 3 others like this.
  3. 3
    No one forces you to do anything. If you work someplace that provides abortions, and you don't want to participate, you are free to go work someplace else. If you disagree with it, that's fine. It's an option that is available to patients if they want it, should be discussed if a patient wants to discuss it, and you cannot discriminate against them for their personal decisions.
    Anonymous865, Fiona59, and fromtheseaRN like this.
  4. 5
    Totally False

    Quote from AZnurse_2B
    I wish it was as simple as this. Part of the new healthcare plan includes mandates that all hospitals (even those that are Catholic) perform so many abortions each year to qualify for federal funding. If all that actually comes into effect, those hospitals will either comply or be at serious risk of going out of business. This also will mean that hospitals will need nurses to perform those procedures. If this is something that matters to you, it's a great time to speak up and have a voice in the matter.

    As of now though, Catholic hospitals do not typically perform abortions.
    KelRN215, HazelLPN, herring_RN, and 2 others like this.
  5. 3
    I have to admit, I never liked OB, so I thought, whew never going to be an issue to me.

    As an Emergency RN, I had a lot of opportunity to care for women who were either considering abortion or had had one and were now having complications. Never had a problem with that. I always felt a great deal of compassion for these women because they were usually already embarassed and shamed, and frankly speaking, I thought about What Jesus would do- forgive them and show them love.

    Went overseas...and was asked if I would mind assisting with this procedure. I have to admit...I do mind. I could not do it at all.
    Despite this, I believe that abortion should remain a legal procedure.
    I just realized I can not be part of the providers. Those people I think are very unique and special, very strong minded.

    So actually, I do not think thinking about this ahead of time is such a bad idea. I wish I had, I was asked at a meeting and really was speechless.
    HazelLPN, JZ_RN, and Skips like this.
  6. 0
    federal law prohibits forcing nurses or others to participate in abortion.
    u. s. code title 42 > chapter 6a > subchapter viii > § 300a–7 states:
    prohibition of public officials and public authorities from imposition of certain requirements contrary to religious beliefs or moral convictions


    the receipt of any grant, contract, loan, or loan guarantee under the public health service act [42 u.s.c. 201 et seq.], the community mental health centers act [42 u.s.c. 2689 et seq.], or the developmental disabilities services and facilities construction act [42 u.s.c. 6000 et seq.] by any individual or entity does not authorize any court or any public official or other public authority to require—
    (1) such individual to perform or assist in the performance of any sterilization procedure or abortion if his performance or assistance in the performance of such procedure or abortion would be contrary to his religious beliefs or moral convictions; …

    http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/42...0---a007-.html
  7. 2
    ZOMBIE THREAD!!!!

    RUN!!!!

    KelRN215 and Fiona59 like this.
  8. 8
    Where did you "hear" that nurses were forced to do abortions? Some hardcore anti abortion group? NO ONE is forced to do a damn thing. Chill out. And guess what..you will have patients who are...DIVORCED! Wait..isn't that a "sin" as well? Will you take care of those people? Will you provide care to atheists? Will you provide care to people who covet their neighbors wife? Will you provide care for anyone you disagree with? You better be ready to check yourself a bit before you become a fricking nurse.
    Anonymous865, tewdles, KelRN215, and 5 others like this.
  9. 1
    I agree with you - a doctor I know does not believe in prescribing birth control pills due to his strict religious beliefs, and he is clear with all his patients about this boundary, so if the patient isn't OK with his beliefs, they must find another doctor. I admire him not because I agree with him or share his religion, but because he still has moral boundaries and practices medicine. Without moral boundaries in medicine, (although extreme) one can end up working for that crazy doctor on trial - you know, the one with the abortion clinic who delivered live babies - and murdered them.

    I have battled with the abortion question all my life. It is only recently after taking Anatomy and Physiology II that I realized my stance for the first time in my life. Logically, if we declare death based on brain activity ceasing, then shouldn't we "declare life" the moment brain activity begins? Brain wave activity in the embryo is detected during month 2.

    I have moral boundaries as well - I am committed to life for both the mother - and the baby. Yes, in rare instances, it is smarter to save 1 if both are at risk, but if both are healthy - I personally could not assist in termination of life. I would feel like an "accessory" to a spiritual crime. I am choosing nursing as a career to keep my soul clean - not to intellectualize bad, moral deeds for the sake of "women's freedom." But then again, I am not yet an RN, so please forgive me if I am speaking from medical ignorance here.

    Lastly, the irony is, if we ask most women who have had an abortion - studies show that many do not experience profound "freedom" but rather deep, emotional, and sometimes lifetime anguish and turmoil that affects future relationships and can have an effect on future children. What may be a short term solution can result in long term, irreversible spiritual suffering - no matter what one's religious beliefs may be.
    ammil87 likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from windsurfer8
    Where did you "hear" that nurses were forced to do abortions? Some hardcore anti abortion group? NO ONE is forced to do a damn thing. Chill out. And guess what..you will have patients who are...DIVORCED! Wait..isn't that a "sin" as well? Will you take care of those people? Will you provide care to atheists? Will you provide care to people who covet their neighbors wife? Will you provide care for anyone you disagree with? You better be ready to check yourself a bit before you become a fricking nurse.
    I agree with you that "no one is forced to do a * thing," yet, I don't quite understand your reasoning when you compare abortion to divorcees. Unless the divorcee is asking the nurse to assist in "permanent termination of an unwanted spouse" then I am led to believe abortion and divorce are not truly under the same category. With a divorce, (or in your other example, atheism) both people (or person) can remain healthy and continue on with their lives. With an abortion, only one person gets to continue on with their life.

    I am not saying you are wrong or anyone is wrong here - I am just saying, we all have our own boundaries of what we will and won't tolerate. I agree with you, just like with your advice you provided, this is good to explore before one becomes a nurse. In medicine, there's a need in every niche, just like in business. Knowing our own boundaries can help to define what niche we are willing to serve.


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