Stop complaining about your job - It could be worse. - page 3

by brian 13,513 Views | 36 Comments Admin

Do you know of any complainers? Are they constantly nagging at you about how bad they have it at "their job"? Is there something you would like to say to these people? Please share your stories below... Click Like if... Read More


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    Before I went back to school for nursing, I was an elementary school teacher. I was a per diem substitute teacher for several years in many, many local schools and had to listen to daily complaint sessions in the teacher's lounge. I'd sit there with my lunch, quiet, while tenured teachers would go on and on about whatever was bugging them that day. I was a sub making less than $100/day, no benefits, no union representation, no guarantee I'd work tomorrow. I always wanted to speak up and tell them how lucky they were, and if every single one of them was fired tomorrow, the schools could have the entire school restaffed by noon with restaurant servers and pizza delivery drivers all armed with BSEd's and certifications. It's just not classy to complain about job dissatisfaction in front of people with NO job.
    Aviationurse likes this.
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    The "just be thankful to have a job" mantra is exactly what upper management wants us to say.

    I'm a government employee in a union with great benefits and I make at least $5 more an hour than my LPN compatriots who work in local private nursing homes. I'm proud of this and see no reason why I should be discrete about it. And I see no reason why "market wages" should convince me to accept a penny lessor make a single concession.

    When did words like "tenure" or "pension" or "union" become synonymous with "greed"? The real greed is in the politicians and business leaders who have systematically smashed almost everything the labor movement fought tooth and nail for.

    I'll complain about working conditions whenever I see fit. I don't view my job as a privilege bestowed upon me. What an absurd way of thinking.
    Benedina, SleeepyRN, hotdemos, and 6 others like this.
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    One of my RN co-workers was talking about all the bills she had to pay/repairs she had to do at her house in front of a patient one day. It wasn't really that unprofessional in the setting we are in because that's mostly what we do in psych is talk to patients and sometimes they get tid-bits of what's going on in our lives. The guy was talking about his wife working and things they had done around the house which is what brought it up.

    Except...he had just lost his job. That's partly why he ended up in our psych facility was the depression that stemmed from losing his job. So, after she ranted for a few seconds about her bills, etc., he says, "Well, at least you have a job." It kind of puts things in perspective.
    Aviationurse likes this.
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    Quote from Ntheboat2
    One of my RN co-workers was talking about all the bills she had to pay/repairs she had to do at her house in front of a patient one day. It wasn't really that unprofessional in the setting we are in because that's mostly what we do in psych is talk to patients and sometimes they get tid-bits of what's going on in our lives. The guy was talking about his wife working and things they had done around the house which is what brought it up.

    Except...he had just lost his job. That's partly why he ended up in our psych facility was the depression that stemmed from losing his job. So, after she ranted for a few seconds about her bills, etc., he says, "Well, at least you have a job." It kind of puts things in perspective.
    ^This post reminded me of a nurse I worked with that ALWAYS complained from the assignment she got, the pt's diagnoses, that made her job "so much harder" (this was a Tele/Stepdown unit that she had been working on for 15 years at the time) complained about the schedule she got (which was self scheduled) complained about other people's schedules.

    One day she started her regular distaste of what she didn't like. I turned to her and said "It must be something you like about being here; otherwise why are you here?" Now, this was when I had been five years into the healthcare arena and was studying for my boards for my PN at the time...maybe I was naive, or maybe I wanted her to stop complaining, lol...I worked with the woman for two years on and off. That stopped her in her tracks. She said to me, "maybe I do..." After that conversation, she really didn't have much to complain about.

    I'm not sure what she had going on in her life...maybe nursing is what she had to keep her going...*shrugs* I just know that day she put my question in perspective about her own happiness.
  5. 1
    The Magnet hospital I work at has not given nurses' a pay rise in 3 years, yet the doctors sit around and gloat about their big bonuses they get each year. But at least they still provide benefits for the nurses.
    Home health is the epitome of the economy. No benefits, no hours, no guarantee of work tomorrow. You get no vacation unless you find someone to cover for you. I even got paid by one company on a company visa card that didn’t have my name on it so I couldn’t use it in stores only POS. I had to pay 25c per transaction.
    The ANA and schools tout nursing as a profession and state that they require you to gain a bachelors, if that is so, then companies need to treat and pay the staff like professionals. I was excited about the concept of learning and creating evidenced based practice, I wrote up an EBP article for management, they just said “oh that’s great, e-mail it to everyone” and that was the end of that: My Magnet hospital treats us all like “just (stupid) nurses”. Not what I was expecting. I believe if more men enter the profession, we would get treated better.
    Yes, I am leaving the profession.
    Aviationurse likes this.
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    AMEN!!!! to OP
    Last edit by jtmarcy12 on Mar 20, '13 : Reason: clarify who this was written for
  7. 4
    Quote from frodo-dog
    The Magnet hospital I work at has not given nurses' a pay rise in 3 years, yet the doctors sit around and gloat about their big bonuses they get each year. But at least they still provide benefits for the nurses.
    Home health is the epitome of the economy. No benefits, no hours, no guarantee of work tomorrow. You get no vacation unless you find someone to cover for you. I even got paid by one company on a company visa card that didn’t have my name on it so I couldn’t use it in stores only POS. I had to pay 25c per transaction.
    The ANA and schools tout nursing as a profession and state that they require you to gain a bachelors, if that is so, then companies need to treat and pay the staff like professionals. I was excited about the concept of learning and creating evidenced based practice, I wrote up an EBP article for management, they just said “oh that’s great, e-mail it to everyone” and that was the end of that: My Magnet hospital treats us all like “just (stupid) nurses”. Not what I was expecting. I believe if more men enter the profession, we would get treated better.
    Yes, I am leaving the profession.
    *** It has been my experience that such treatment is typical of Magnet hospitals. Among my circle of ICU, transport, ER nurses and CRNAs Magnet hospitals have developed a well deserved reputation as not being good places to work.
    While I continue to work for a large "non profit" Magnet hospital part time, 3 years ago I found a great job is a smaller, non-Magnet, union hospital were nurses are treated fairly and decently. I hope my living never again is dependant on a Magnet hospital.
    hotdemos, Aviationurse, gswifty, and 1 other like this.
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    I love being a nurse, yet I fundamentally disagree with the just be happy to have a job crowd. The RN isn't just working a job, we are fulfilling a professional role with our primary responsibility being our patients. If the situation in hospitals, whether it be staffing, mandatory overtime (that is manipulated for non-emergent situations) or pay and benefits for our profession does not reflect our commitment to pt safety and outcomes, then yes we should complain. Who we complain to is the question. And how we complain. A lone voice or a collection of over 3 million colleagues.
    hotdemos, PMFB-RN, Aviationurse, and 2 others like this.
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    Be careful what you say on allnurses.com because a Thread can be closed by staff for review.
  10. 0
    Quote from hotdemos
    Be careful what you say on allnurses.com because a Thread can be closed by staff for review.
    Yes, but that's really only done for TOS violations or if things get too heated and the thread needs to cool off. Simply disagreeing with something that is posted or carrying on a lively debate doesn't get threads shut down or posts deleted.


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