Two VERY low ball job offers in the last month...(management and leadership!)

  1. 0
    Ok, a little background. I have my background in management which is what I did before I became a nurse. I now have five years nursing experience as well as my ASN, BSN, and my MSN.

    I have been interviewing for jobs in management and leadership as I feel that I am ready to be doing what I have trained to do as well as being paid what I feel I should be. This is apparently not going to be the case.

    The first job, for a DON position with a start up homecare company they offered me a whopping $49,800, knowing that my salary requirements were MUCH higher than this.

    The second one, an assistant DON position with a staffing agency, they offered $55,000 per year. Again, knowing that my salary requirements were much higher.

    It's not as if I don't have the experience that they want. Where are they coming up with these horrendously low numbers? To say that I am insulted is putting it mildly. Hell, even floor staff make more than that.

    I know that the market in my area is saturated with ASN's and because of this many employers are paying just above minimum wage, but this doesn't explain where the low-ball numbers come from for an experienced nurse in a leadership position.

    Anyone have any possible advice here? Should I just give it up already?

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  2. 44 Comments...

  3. 1
    WHat state are you in? I would *only* take one of these jobs if it is your first leadership role and you need it for experience otherwise I'd keep looking. Every job you get after this will be looking to pay you slightly above what you accept here. So make sure you know that when accepting such a low starting point. If you have zero experience with a management position you might just need to suck it up and take what you can get.
    joanna73 likes this.
  4. 0
    Quote from MJB2010
    WHat state are you in? I would *only* take one of these jobs if it is your first leadership role and you need it for experience otherwise I'd keep looking. Every job you get after this will be looking to pay you slightly above what you accept here. So make sure you know that when accepting such a low starting point. If you have zero experience with a management position you might just need to suck it up and take what you can get.
    Michigan, and I have five years management experience. I would never take any of these jobs for less than 68,500, which I feel is even lower than should be accepted.

    I have no interest in either of these jobs because of the low ball offer, I simply feel discouraged and insulted at the clear difference between my expectations of salary and what is being offered. A DON in my area can expect to make at least $110K per year, an ADON, approximately $80-85K, just to give an idea.
  5. 5
    Ok, then I would counter offer. At this point, you have zero intention of taking a position at the rate they offered so you have nothing to lose. I'd counter offer ABOVE what you are willing to accept, with well thought out responses and reasons to back up your request and then see if you can negotiate to something reasonable. I do not think this will be successful but you have nothing to lose, only to gain. I would consider these not viable though, and keep looking for someplace a little more realistic with their pay. Might be a good opportunity to " practice" counter offer and negotiation.
  6. 9
    Quote from MJB2010
    Ok, then I would counter offer. At this point, you have zero intention of taking a position at the rate they offered so you have nothing to lose. I'd counter offer ABOVE what you are willing to accept, with well thought out responses and reasons to back up your request and then see if you can negotiate to something reasonable. I do not think this will be successful but you have nothing to lose, only to gain. I would consider these not viable though, and keep looking for someplace a little more realistic with their pay. Might be a good opportunity to " practice" counter offer and negotiation.
    Already done that. Neither would budge. Not even an inch. They said that was all their budget would allow for, even when I showed them both proof of how low-ball they were. I am counting my losses on these two, but are all organizations low-balling right now? Is it my area?

    BTW- if you're a new grad and reading this, stop taking $17-18 an hour and considering that "good money." You're not only hurting yourself, you are hurting the rest of us as well.
    Chin up, Marisette, chevyv, and 6 others like this.
  7. 16
    Quote from SweettartRN
    BTW- if you're a new grad and reading this, stop taking $17-18 an hour and considering that "good money." You're not only hurting yourself, you are hurting the rest of us as well.
    Interesting perspective. Until we quit churning out new grads by the thousands every year in areas that can't support them, and/or we start having unions, I can't see that changing.
    Marisette, Swellz, emmasuern, and 13 others like this.
  8. 6
    In my area new hires ( new grad and experienced) are takin pay cuts just to get a job. That's what happens in a glut in a non union area.
    Marisette, joanna73, barbyann, and 3 others like this.
  9. 0
    Those are both for profits in a big way I am sure. Try getting a management job at a bigger employer with less of a corporate profit focus would be my suggestion.
  10. 10
    Quote from SweettartRN
    BTW- if you're a new grad and reading this, stop taking $17-18 an hour and considering that "good money." You're not only hurting yourself, you are hurting the rest of us as well.
    I made significantly more than that as a new grad, but that's because the going rate in my area was higher than that. I had 0 room to negotiate and was running out of time I could afford being unemployed. It's not really fair to blame the individual for something that is a structural problem, frustrating as it is to see the effect it has on the wider profession.
    BluegrassRN, KelRN215, joanna73, and 7 others like this.
  11. 3
    Yeah all the above. Negotiating is not going to get you far in this economy unless you are the one accepting less. Sux but that is the way it is. Healthcare is on total downward pressure.

    The carpet baggers that want to start a HH or hospice these days want the money honey and that is the only reason they are in it. You are just a means to their end, and you can bet you will have screws turned on your license to cut corners and ethics for them. Count on it. New home health and hospice are the absolute worst of the worst. You should look for a major medical practice group and try there for management of some sort. I'm talking about the groups that are growing in numbers, ususally 50 or more MDs in specialty practice to avoid being eliminated by the big hospital networks.
    NRSKarenRN, barbyann, and KarenJordan like this.


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