Young, Thin, and Cute New Hires - page 13

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

My workplace, a freestanding specialty hospital owned by a for-profit corporation that operates multiple facilities across the United States, has been having recent troubles with low Press Ganey patient satisfaction scores. This... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from DeBerham
    LOL, yes.

    Alrighty then. As you like it.
  2. 1
    Quote from Susie2310

    You are not impressing me with your hubris. Grow up.
    A little immature, don't you think?

    Look, she is right, aging should bring experience which should be respected but just because someone is older does not mean they have more experience.
    prnqday likes this.
  3. 2
    Overall though, you have to admit that this thread is a hoot.

    The generally mentality of superficiality more than suggests that nursing is NOT truly considered or even thinks of itself (at least not widely enough) as a profession.

    A person, regardless of his/her age, is the whole person. Again nursing and those in nursing leadership show their hypocrisy. They talk and preach holistic approach--treating the whole person, and yet, lol, they relegate a person to superficial things such as age--something for which no one has any control, and they never will.

    A person is not a number such as chronological age. And whatever happened to the current trend of looking at people according to their biological age? People have no idea whatsoever of my age until they see a birth date or a number, or my children--I mean then they can make some inferences, b/c most people don't have kids at ages 5 or 10. If you put too much on your resume with dates, same thing.

    Ageism is a joke, anyway, in a day when people are essentially unable to retire.



    The real issue for hiring comes down to money--but hiring mostly those without experience also smacks in the face of Magnet, good sense, and an esprit de corps in terms of nursing professinalism, huh? Or does anyone really think that a full undergrad degree in nursing makes the difference without strong, clinical experience? (Somewhat of a failing in terms of the Aiken study--confusing those with BSNs with experience with those BSNs w/o experience.)

    Oh the hypocrisy and silly capricious behaviors.

    So anyway, I read that teachers up in NY state get free or low-cost plastic surgery as part of thier teacher's union benefits package. Perhaps this is something nurses should start looking to get as a benefit. LOL


    Boy this thread really tweaked some folks. LOL
    Yet there is something terribly honest about the nature of what OP has shared, and a great many comments that followed. . .it's sad.

    It seems that you just can't count on nursing as being viewed (within or without) as a profession.

    And last I checked, flight attendants fall under occupation--though I am sure some would debate that. Don't know the pedagogy or their theoretical framework for flight attending though, but whatever.

    Next time I go to any physicians, my number one deal will be to make sure they are young, great looking, and cut. I mean isn't that the man thing?
    Last edit by samadams8 on Mar 2, '13 : Reason: had to reboot
    NB19938 and Esme12 like this.
  4. 20
    " All I'm saying is we deserve the same respect you guys think you deserve."
    Jenni811, you seem smart, driven and raring to take up the challenge of being the best nurse in the facility. But don't let your ego and IQ fool you into thinking that you know so much -- experience has a way of catching up to you and informing you as to just how much you do not yet know. From my viewpoint (a couple decades older than you) life has plenty to teach you that you are not even close to being aware of yet. In life, I've seen that being human is just as important a qualification to success (and personal satisfaction) as is academic achievement and climbing the ladder quickly. I have noticed when I was volunteering (as a CNA), as well as in nursing school, that after basic technical skill mastery, being "human" seems to be a critical core component of the RNs that I admire and respect.

    One thing does seem to be a bit bothersome: you seem to have not learned that true respect is earned, not given. Do not expect to be given "respect" simply because you demand it by having a good GPA and some certifications. Guess what? I have the GPA and the certs too, and likely more degrees than you - for instance, did you get As in differential and integral calculus, or 2 semesters of organic chemistry? I did. But in light of my ability to do my duty as a nurse, those paper things are relatively meaningless. Think about the real meaning of the "respect" you are demanding: if its given so cheaply (a bunch of paper) and easily (just because you demanded it), then it is probably not of much true value. Let your actions speak for you, not your words. Here your words do you a disservice by making you appear "green" and arrogant. I am not saying you are, just that is what the words convey. Perceptions...

    I freely admit have even less nurse experience than you (as well as my mom's 40+ years as an RN). As a matter of fact, I will not even graduate for another year and a half. But I learned how to earn my respect the hard way first, as a soldier. Then getting my second degree (comp sci) while I was in, and working corporate when I got out. (you want ageism? try being in software past your mid 30s, you become basically unhirable in that field once you pass 40). Rather than put up with the tacit but inherent age discrimination in the corporate computer world looming on my horizon, I started my own small tech consultancy and ran it successfully enough to be able to go back to school yet again. This time, my objective was to have my vocation and avocation converged: my "final" career: RN. So what if it took me years to figure it what I wanted to do; call me a slow learner ;-D

    So when you see this "old guy" come on board as a newbie nurse, please do not start with your assumption about younger people having computer skills better than "the older" nurses. I could probably design and write the systems you use, and run rings around you using it. Also, stop thinking you are my my "superior" -- because you are not. You are my charge nurse. There is a difference.

    Here is a handy Latin saying I learned many years ago in Catholic school, from which you may benefit: "Acta, non verba". It was a hard lesson for me when I enlisted in the Army (at your age) having already earned my first bachelor's degree (giving me the false arrogance that I was "superior" due to certifications and a high GPA). Anyone with life experience will not be overly impressed by academic achievement like GPA and paper awards. This is especially so if they are backed up by only 2 years of real experience, and very little life experience. I learned early as a non-commissioned officer that rank (or office) will be rendered its formal/legal due by others, but the person bearing that rank or filling that office still has to earn the actual respect. When I got promoted, I was told by my experienced 1SG that in the real world, where things can go wrong and people can die, my college and my brand new sergeant's stripes meant 2 things : jack and squat. It was up to me to show (not just pass exams) that I was a capable soldier and a capable leader by my actions.

    As an RN (and a student at the moment), I guarantee you this: I do not and will not demand respect from anyone when I'm on the unit. I realize that I am just a student, and even after I graduate, I will be just a newbie. But I expect to eventually have the respect of my peers and supervisors, but only after I have done things to earn it -- and not a moment sooner (and certainly not after only 2 or 3 years on the job!).

    We tend to learn best from our mistakes. But life is short, so we don't have enough time to make all the mistakes we need to make in order to learn all we need to know. So take advantage and learn from the mistakes of others. Feel free to benefit from my prior error of ego, and ask yourself "what if I am wrong?" Hubris can being some hard lessons.


    LadyFree28, theantichick, NB19938, and 17 others like this.
  5. 3
    Quote from ColoradoRocky


    Jenni811, you seem smart, driven and raring to take up the challenge of being the best nurse in the facility. But don't let your ego and IQ fool you into thinking that you know so much -- experience has a way of catching up to you and informing you as to just how much you do not yet know. From my viewpoint (a couple decades older than you) life has plenty to teach you that you are not even close to being aware of yet. In life, I've seen that being human is just as important a qualification to success (and personal satisfaction) as is academic achievement and climbing the ladder quickly. I have noticed when I was volunteering (as a CNA), as well as in nursing school, that after basic technical skill mastery, being "human" seems to be a critical core component of the RNs that I admire and respect.

    One thing does seem to be a bit bothersome: you seem to have not learned that true respect is earned, not given. Do not expect to be given "respect" simply because you demand it by having a good GPA and some certifications. Guess what? I have the GPA and the certs too, and likely more degrees than you - for instance, did you get As in differential and integral calculus, or 2 semesters of organic chemistry? I did. But in light of my ability to do my duty as a nurse, those paper things are relatively meaningless. Think about the real meaning of the "respect" you are demanding: if its given so cheaply (a bunch of paper) and easily (just because you demanded it), then it is probably not of much true value. Let your actions speak for you, not your words. Here your words do you a disservice by making you appear "green" and arrogant. I am not saying you are, just that is what the words convey. Perceptions...

    I freely admit have even less nurse experience than you (as well as my mom's 40+ years as an RN). As a matter of fact, I will not even graduate for another year and a half. But I learned how to earn my respect the hard way first, as a soldier. Then getting my second degree (comp sci) while I was in, and working corporate when I got out. (you want ageism? try being in software past your mid 30s, you become basically unhirable in that field once you pass 40). Rather than put up with the tacit but inherent age discrimination in the corporate computer world looming on my horizon, I started my own small tech consultancy and ran it successfully enough to be able to go back to school yet again. This time, my objective was to have my vocation and avocation converged: my "final" career: RN. So what if it took me years to figure it what I wanted to do; call me a slow learner ;-D

    So when you see this "old guy" come on board as a newbie nurse, please do not start with your assumption about younger people having computer skills better than "the older" nurses. I could probably design and write the systems you use, and run rings around you using it. Also, stop thinking you are my my "superior" -- because you are not. You are my charge nurse. There is a difference.

    Here is a handy Latin saying I learned many years ago in Catholic school, from which you may benefit: "Acta, non verba". It was a hard lesson for me when I enlisted in the Army (at your age) having already earned my first bachelor's degree (giving me the false arrogance that I was "superior" due to certifications and a high GPA). Anyone with life experience will not be overly impressed by academic achievement like GPA and paper awards. This is especially so if they are backed up by only 2 years of real experience, and very little life experience. I learned early as a non-commissioned officer that rank (or office) will be rendered its formal/legal due by others, but the person bearing that rank or filling that office still has to earn the actual respect. When I got promoted, I was told by my experienced 1SG that in the real world, where things can go wrong and people can die, my college and my brand new sergeant's stripes meant 2 things : jack and squat. It was up to me to show (not just pass exams) that I was a capable soldier and a capable leader by my actions.

    As an RN (and a student at the moment), I guarantee you this: I do not and will not demand respect from anyone when I'm on the unit. I realize that I am just a student, and even after I graduate, I will be just a newbie. But I expect to eventually have the respect of my peers and supervisors, but only after I have done things to earn it -- and not a moment sooner (and certainly not after only 2 or 3 years on the job!).

    We tend to learn best from our mistakes. But life is short, so we don't have enough time to make all the mistakes we need to make in order to learn all we need to know. So take advantage and learn from the mistakes of others. Feel free to benefit from my prior error of ego, and ask yourself "what if I am wrong?" Hubris can being some hard lessons.


    Well said.
  6. 11
    After reading all of this I've decided I'm going to go in to work tomorrow and hug my coworkers! First the head nurse for being willing to hire me despite my age, and for renewing my contract repeatedly even after discovering that I'm not only old, but fat as well! (Ugly is subjective).
    Then I'm going to tell my young, less experienced coworkers how much I appreciate the respect with which they treat me and the times they request my input and tell me they appreciate my experienced viewpoint. (The reproducing ones even pay me the huge compliment of saying they hope I am working when they deliver!)
    In return I'm always willing to share tips, help out in difficult situations, review their papers for their advanced degrees and pick up the slack in any way I can.
    That is what you get for treating your coworkers with respect. If you treat them with the disdain evident in so many of these posts you get the bare minimum necessary, nothing more, short of patient harm.
    Oh, and despite having never touched a computer until I started nursing school (I think there were 6 in the library at that time) I still manage to learn a new charting system approximately every 3 months!
  7. 4
    A seasoned nurse once said, when she was a new nurse she thought she knew everything, 10 years later she found out she knew nothing. Experience is the best teacher. Experience is not based on biological age or number of years in nursing. In my opinion, experience learning,practicing, and knowing what you know and don't know and never being content with current nursing practice. I have met experienced seasoned nurses who still have the mentality that "this is how we always do it", yet they not apprecatiated the evidence based practice and innovation that nursing brings today. Nursing is always evolving. Nurses should never be content at where they are, or atleast I'm not. There is always something to learn and grow from.

    Bottom line is: There is nothing wrong with hiring young,cute, and thin as long as that nurse is competent. Sorry, but not all seasoned nurses are competent.
    We need eachother. Newer nurses regardless of age bring fresh ideas and eyes to nursing while seasoned nurses have much wisdom to offer.
  8. 4
    Quote from Jenni811





    yea i do feel a little offended beause people judge all these newbies coming in. Look beyond that, get to know them. No i do NOT have my smart phone out all the time. I am professional when i am at work. yes ill pull it out on my break...because that is my BREAK, that is my time for me to be me and do want i want to do for 30 minutes. So yea...all in all, i have to say hospitals are making a smart BUSINESS move by hiring young, new and eager nurses to work the floors. They are cheaper and can do the same exact thing as any other nurse on the floor. I'm probably repeating myself a lot but think about it...
    much of what you say makes sense, but I am not sure you would feel the same about these smart "business" moves if you were 45 - and still wanted to do bedside - which many older nurses do. Not all of them want to move on into other areas. They LOVE what they are doing and want to keep doing it.

    Lets face it, we live in a world where looks are important. Most businesses benefit from having attractive people around, because humans like to look at attractive people, and react more positively to them. That doesn't make it right, though. We should not be judged on how good or how young we look - ESPECIALLY in a job where we are responsible for people's lives.

    I also would like to add, booksmart nurses do not make the best nurses - they may just have a better memory for facts, for piling in all the information thrown at students and remembering it at test time. The real skills in nursing come from experience, there is no substitute for it! If I were a patient, sorry, but it would be important to me that my nurse had experience....and I don't think I am the only one who feels that way.
    LadyFree28, tnmarie, monkeybug, and 1 other like this.
  9. 3
    I never needed convincing to be a strong advocate for my family members when they are in the position of receiving "health care", but this thread has ensured that I will be with my family members round the clock if they are hospitalized, as I am now, and will be extra vigilant as to the quality of care my family are receiving in all health care settings. We have inexperience masquerading as experience, which apparently the health care business believes is acceptable for the public to receive as long as the outward appearance is right. What a recipe for disaster.
    Last edit by Susie2310 on Mar 2, '13
    LadyFree28, mc3, and redhead_NURSE98! like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from chrisrn24
    A little immature, don't you think?

    Look, she is right, aging should bring experience which should be respected but just because someone is older does not mean they have more experience.
    chrisrn24, does your mother have more life experience than you? Does a nurse with many years experience have more experience than a nurse with a few years experience?


Top