Sexual Orientation Question - pg.5 | allnurses

Sexual Orientation Question - page 5

I have been thinking about this lately...and I am being serious when I ask this; but, with all the advancements in knowing about risk factors for various diseases (especially STIs), what does sexual... Read More

  1. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    0
    Off kilter analogy, of sorts: I smoked 'heavily' for 25 years, 2-3 packs a day. Marlboro, Reds, Box, only (I still miss them 10 years later!). Every time I got bronchitis and went to the Doc, he'd naturally ask: "Do you smoke?" I always said: "No way, never- are you kidding me? I'm a nurse- my patients infected me!" So, not only was he naive and lacking basic assessment skills, but also- I lied to his face, so he wouldn't think I was a 'bad person'. . .who smoked.
  2. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    0
    Quote from CountryMomma
    You ask, because they may need a safe place to explore their fears, their questions, and their feelings. We are the safe, neutral place they can go to. Teens know about confidentiality and protection. Why is it dangerous for them to admit to their medical profession that they may or are GLBQT? What on earth do hate crimes have to do with it? I hope like hell nurses aren't wagging their tongues at the local lynching tree about Johnny being gay. ?!

    There is a stigma. Yes. Which is why teens need to be screened for increased suicide, self-harm, and domestic/peer abuse. How are you going to know that a teen needs a more indepth assessment regarding substance abuse, suicide, domestic abuse, and peer abuse, without knowing what places them at risk?

    And who cares if it is in their chart? Being made available online? To whom? Where? Do you understand confidentiality?

    I don't get what your issue is, but you seem very passionate, and misguided, about this topic. You very neatly sidestepped the rest of my argument, and falsely deconstructed one point.

    Also, one very simple and clear point to your question "What does it affect the outcome, if you are attempting to do your best to give your patients current health information, so they can decide what risks to take, for themselves?" --

    If you do not know what their risks are, and how they are contracting it, and what they are doing, or not doing, to mitigate those risks, you cannot fully inform and educate your client.

    I understand confidentiality, you bet I do. I've been taking HIT classes full time for the past two years- so I can assure you that confidentiality is a thing of the past, that it no longer exists. Read some of my posts, if you will, about 'background testing', etc.

    On the flipside- good point you brought up, that IF teens want to talk, and if THEY want to bring up the point of sexuality, they should be able to, in a safe place. Good counterpoint.
  3. Visit  AnonRNC profile page
    4
    I just want to say thanks... Because of this thread, I had yet ANOTHER conversation with my kids about safe sex...and found out that one thought the Pill protected against STIs. I will continue to have these conversations w/my kids.
    morte, anotherone, uRNmyway, and 1 other like this.
  4. Visit  Altra profile page
    2
    Quote from SuzieVN
    Off kilter analogy, of sorts: I smoked 'heavily' for 25 years, 2-3 packs a day. Marlboro, Reds, Box, only (I still miss them 10 years later!). Every time I got bronchitis and went to the Doc, he'd naturally ask: "Do you smoke?" I always said: "No way, never- are you kidding me? I'm a nurse- my patients infected me!" So, not only was he naive and lacking basic assessment skills, but also- I lied to his face, so he wouldn't think I was a 'bad person'. . .who smoked.
    Unless you have reviewed your entire medical record from this provider, you do not know whether or not his "assessment skills" were lacking and he accepted as factual your insistence that you did not smoke.

    If you are currently a practicing nurse ... I find this comment nave ... that clinicians accept at face value all answers to questions.
    hiddencatRN and anotherone like this.
  5. Visit  rn/writer profile page
    6
    NOT asking about sexual orientation makes it seem like "that which shall not be discussed." It's the elephant in the room. Young people especially might be hesitant to initiate conversation but would respond if someone else brought it up.

    If a healthcare provider can ask such questions in an honest and matter-of-fact manner, this could be a message to the patient that this is a safe environment in which to confide and seek assistance with whatever they need.

    If a healthcare provider is not able to ask in a non-emotional, non-judgmental way, they might want to work on that.
    hiddencatRN, AnonRNC, uRNmyway, and 3 others like this.
  6. Visit  theatredork profile page
    0
    In 2010, men who sleep with men (MSM) accounted for 63% of new infections and 78% of new infections among males. This is still a predominantly disease affecting gay men. Even scarier, this represented a 12% uptick in the estimated number new infetions from 2008 to 2010 among MSM. So, absolutely, it still matters.

    To also comment on the unsafe sex practices during the beginning of the AIDS crisis: heterosexuals also had unsafe sex practices as well. Oral contraceptives became available to women in the United States in the early 70s. The fact that it wasn't seen among the heterosexual population is because, as someone said earlier, it was easier to get via anal intercourse. Bareback sex is not limited to just gay people, but the risks are different.

    You can say HIV is HIV, but you're at greater risk if you're a man that sleeps with men, and even more so if you're unsafe.
  7. Visit  Jory profile page
    1
    Quote from wish_me_luck
    I have been thinking about this lately...and I am being serious when I ask this; but, with all the advancements in knowing about risk factors for various diseases (especially STIs), what does sexual orientation have to do with anything?

    What I mean is this--like HIV/AIDs, it was first thought to be a gay man's disease; now we know that it can be transmitted whether you are gay or straight. Another example would be all women getting pap smears whether they are a homosexual, bisexual, or heterosexual--what's wrong with just teaching all females to get pap smears as long as they have a cervix?...leaving it at a statement rather than asking their sexual preferences.

    I just can't think of one disease or educational need that only applies to people who are homosexual or bisexual. All the ones I can think of are pretty universal diseases/health promotion exams/teachings. I just think it can lead to discrimination rather than anything good.

    Thoughts?
    You are partially correct. The problem with that thought process, is some groups are at a higher risk than others.

    IV drug use and Hep C...go hand in hand. If someone has Hep C I am also going to ask if they have ever been an IV drug user...survey is about 50% of ones that contracted it through drugs versus sex.

    If I have a woman that says she has a variety of sexual partners (though few admit) then it's shocking how a long list of STD's usually fall with it.

    While the POPULATION of heterosexuals that have HIV are higher than gays, the CONCENTRATION percentage of HIV infections is HIGHER in gay men than the general population. So yes, if someone is a gay male, then that is going to be of concern.

    In healthcare, you cannot disregard high risk groups...it is not a stereotype, it is based on FACT.
    Altra likes this.
  8. Visit  uRNmyway profile page
    5
    You know what I noticed on here? You have one person who identifies as bisexual come on here and say she PREFERS TO BE ASKED about orientation. And a few straight people who say 'No no, it doesn't matter, it shouldn't be asked.' Who is really encouraging the stigma and hush-hush mentality here?
    hiddencatRN, CountryMomma, AnonRNC, and 2 others like this.
  9. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    1
    Quote from AnonRNC
    I just want to say thanks... Because of this thread, I had yet ANOTHER conversation with my kids about safe sex...and found out that one thought the Pill protected against STIs. I will continue to have these conversations w/my kids.
    The young generation today has no clue. Since HIV meds came about, the panic about sex and disease and death has faded out. Nobody I know uses condoms. Women I know that cheat on spouses have abortions- yet again, what about STDs? It's amazing. Gay men I know are clueless also- they think that 'tested negative' last year somehow translates into negative, still, today? Some have told me also that since they are already HIV+, why should they bother with condoms? Well, there is more than one strain of HIV, for starters- and isn't HIV bad enough without asking for syphillis, gonorrhea, or any flavor of hepatis?

    If you missed my mentioning the movie "The Pill", I bet you'd like to watch it with your kids. It doesn't reference STDs at all, but it illustrates, in a cute and clever way, just how complicated sex can be. Free on hulu.com
    anotherone likes this.
  10. Visit  uRNmyway profile page
    0
    Quote from SuzieVN
    The young generation today has no clue. Since HIV meds came about, the panic about sex and disease and death has faded out. Nobody I know uses condoms. Women I know that cheat on spouses have abortions- yet again, what about STDs? It's amazing. Gay men I know are clueless also- they think that 'tested negative' last year somehow translates into negative, still, today? Some have told me also that since they are already HIV+, why should they bother with condoms? Well, there is more than one strain of HIV, for starters- and isn't HIV bad enough without asking for syphillis, gonorrhea, or any flavor of hepatis?

    If you missed my mentioning the movie "The Pill", I bet you'd like to watch it with your kids. It doesn't reference STDs at all, but it illustrates, in a cute and clever way, just how complicated sex can be. Free on hulu.com

    Um, WHAT?! Yes, because it's all about them not contracting anything else, not about protecting OTHERS from that! Geez....
  11. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    1
    It's a given they are not concerned about the partners, for sure. My point is that they don't realize, yes- they can get even sicker...
    anotherone likes this.
  12. Visit  logank622 profile page
    0
    BostonFNP - You are correct, I am a new nurse, and I defer to your experience. However, I'm confused by the response from you and WML. Nowhere did I say that I would be divulging private information to a spouse. If a husband asks "what can I do to make my wife more comfortable during menopause" or "what lifestyle changes should we consider now that my wife has osteoporosis", why are we not allowed to answer that? He already knows about her condition. I also don't follow your logic that we would miss an HIV diagnosis because we're discussing Premarin. Aren't we capable of doing both? Do you really think I (or any nurse) wouldn't be able to prioritize that? I think you're trying to put words in my mouth (or on my keyboard, as it were). I was speaking to the OP's question - sexual health doesn't need labels. Trying to define a patient in terms of gay or straight, or even male or female, may cause us to miss the overall picture of their behaviors and risks, because their behaviors may not match their reported label.
  13. Visit  Wrench Party profile page
    1
    I can think of a few. LGBTQ adolescents and young people are more at risk for depression, homelessness, bullying and suicide due to
    the problems associated with being closeted, family kicking them out, lack of positive adult mentors, homophobia in school, etc. Gay youth of color are more at risk for HIV and other STDs because of the cultural stigmas associated with sexual orientation in their communities.
    hiddencatRN likes this.


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