How do you talk to patients with weight issues? - page 3

by CrystalSSA 3,198 Views | 23 Comments

I do not work on a psychiatric unit, but last week alone I had one patient that weighed over 650 lbs and one that weighed under 70 lbs. Both were in total and complete denial. When you have these patients do you talk to... Read More


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    We get anyone having cardiac issues. Both the obese and the anorexic patient were having long pauses in heart beats.
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    What I find ironic in this debate is that there are quite a lot of people in the medical field who have weight problems and I find it funny when one starts lecturing me about being 5 or 10 pounds overweight.
    anotherone likes this.
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    When discussing weight with someone who is underweight, especially if you suspect an eating disorder, the "you could die" approach really isn't helpful.

    Obviously confrontational tones are going to make someone defensive. There's also an issue it may be hard for a mentally healthy person to understand: maybe they want to die. If so your comment becomes encouragement. Some people romanticize the idea of starving to death. Some people are trying to commit suicide via ED. Im not saying that is always the case but it is important to know before you make potentially harmful comments.
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    Quote from Alisonisayoshi
    A nurse did change my life, but she didn't address the weight. She only ever said "how can I help you to fix this?" And she told me "hey I know you aren't crazy, we can make this get better, even if we just make it a little better". It helps to have someone who looks past those judgements and sees you as a real person.
    This is amazing, and I think the best thing about it is that it is something that any nurse could say in almost any setting. Yes, you might not always have time for it in a busy hospital setting, but saying this at the right time/when you have a few minutes could be so therapeutic for both the patient and nurse I think.


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