Call light abuse. What to do??? - page 2

Today I had a pt. who was A&O x3. The nurse giving me report (this was a pt. transferred to me from another unit) said they like to push their call button. They will push it to tell you that they are... Read More

  1. Visit  loriangel14 profile page
    9
    Where I work a patient like that will be assisted into a chair/wheelchair/geri chair and parked out at the nursing station away from their bell.They are made to spend as much time as possible out of their room.( I work in a hospital). If they are well enough to be ringing constantly they don't need to spend all day in bed.
    jadelpn, canoehead, DawnJ, and 6 others like this.
  2. Visit  Tricia76 profile page
    0
    Oh I have one who does that.. As soon as he sees me walk by he pushes his light.
  3. Visit  LOVEGREEN profile page
    0
    Where I work the call bell is on the same remote as the TV. There are 3 buttons, one for the TV, one is the call bell and the one in the middle operates the light. It is not uncommon for a patient to hit the call bell while trying to change the channel or turn the TV on.
  4. Visit  tigerlogic profile page
    3
    sit them in a chair in front of the nursing station
    canoehead, DawnJ, and Kafergie like this.
  5. Visit  neonatal_nurse profile page
    1
    Get your charge nurse/supervisor.
    Stcroix likes this.
  6. Visit  imintrouble profile page
    2
    Who knows what makes people tick? It might be as simple as they're bored. Sometimes I think I'm the entertainment. What a game! There are so many variants. The "how long will it take to answer" game. The "who will it be this time, can I guess right" game. The "will they be mad" game. The "can I say I didn't do it and fool them" game.

    Every once in a while we'll get the guy who likes the younger CNAs in the room. When I suspect that, I take call light duty for that pt. It generally stops since the reward is removed.
    Where I work we can't anger a pt by suggesting they're being unreasonable. Even when they obviously are.

    On a really bad night, all I can do is count down the minutes til I can go home.
    opossum and Orange Tree like this.
  7. Visit  beeker profile page
    0
    Quote from Jenni811
    Ask if they ever heard of the story called "the little boy who cried wolf?" If not print it off Google, hand it to them and tell them to think long and hard about why you picked that to read.
    I would be giving them this lecture. Then de prioritizing their call light. I can't remember ever taking one away, but for this case I think they need theirs off or taken away.
  8. Visit  Jenni811 profile page
    0
    Sometimes their weird behaviors are just boredom. As long as they are appropriate ill send in volunteers to play a game with them or watch a movie...something!! They are always looking for something to do.
  9. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    15
    I'd give them a couple of freebies, then the third time the patient pressed the call light without actually needing anything, I'd sit down with them and explain to them that I'm concerned about their mental status. It's not normal to abusing the nursing staff like that, and I wonder if there is some psychiatric issue that is causing this. I'm going to notify their doctor and recommend that he request a psychiatric consult to see what's going on. I act pleasantly concerned about them, saying I'd hate to let a real issue go unresolved. Most patients are so embarrassed by the idea that they're going to get a psych consult, they shape up immediately. Some require an actual MD consult -- the provider sits down with them and has a "come to Jesus talk".

    If the patient really IS crazy and/or needs a psychiatric consult, then you've got a different issue. A friend of mine swears he's had good success with answering the call light and saying "This is God. I want you to stop abusing my nurses." I can't recommend that; I haven't seen it used. What I HAVE seen work is, for the patient that constantly yells "Help Help Help", a physician pick up the call light to call into the room and say "This is God speaking. I need you to be quiet now."
    Daliadreamer, noyesno, pseudomonas, and 12 others like this.
  10. Visit  uRNmyway profile page
    4
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    I'd give them a couple of freebies, then the third time the patient pressed the call light without actually needing anything, I'd sit down with them and explain to them that I'm concerned about their mental status. It's not normal to abusing the nursing staff like that, and I wonder if there is some psychiatric issue that is causing this. I'm going to notify their doctor and recommend that he request a psychiatric consult to see what's going on. I act pleasantly concerned about them, saying I'd hate to let a real issue go unresolved. Most patients are so embarrassed by the idea that they're going to get a psych consult, they shape up immediately. Some require an actual MD consult -- the provider sits down with them and has a "come to Jesus talk".

    If the patient really IS crazy and/or needs a psychiatric consult, then you've got a different issue. A friend of mine swears he's had good success with answering the call light and saying "This is God. I want you to stop abusing my nurses." I can't recommend that; I haven't seen it used. What I HAVE seen work is, for the patient that constantly yells "Help Help Help", a physician pick up the call light to call into the room and say "This is God speaking. I need you to be quiet now."
    Lol, so for someone who thinks they are God to say that is better than for a nurse to say it, not the same level of lying I guess :P
  11. Visit  Lesley Cook profile page
    2
    Just ask. Why are you doing this? you never know the answer might surprise you. I had a patient that admitted they were frightened and a night light helped, they were pretty anxious as well but ashamed to admit it. But I have also had patients who will continue. Be upfront and firm. A move closer to the nurses station where the patient can be seen is also an option. It is usually brighter and noisier there, and if you tell them that they may not get much sleep if you have to move them they may desist.
    canoehead and tigerlogic like this.
  12. Visit  Calabria profile page
    2
    You could unplug it from the wall .

    (This is a joke. Sort of. But I bet the original poster felt tempted.)
    opossum and katherine100 like this.
  13. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    2
    With these repeat button happy patients, we will request ativan, sedatives, and get them up for a snack. I work LTC. Most people say,"No! I don't want to get up." Me: "Ok, but if you continue on the call bell, we are getting you up." Problem solved usually. Psych consults are often ordered as well.

    Also, we will spend time with them and allow a few repeats. However, I have residents who will ring their call bell q 10 minutes even after we've attended to their needs....and then some. One of my residents is very restless on nights she cannot sleep and craves the attention. Well, we cannot be in the room q10. So I make her stay up later at night until the sedative kicks in. She complains. Tough. I tell her, "You need to be tired and sleep with everyone else."
    Last edit by joanna73 on Mar 8, '13 : Reason: added information
    canoehead and opossum like this.


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