A Nation Of Nonreaders - page 3

I first noticed this serious problem when I was 19 years old and working at a grocery store. One of my coworkers, a middle-aged mother of three who had been married for 15 years, asked for my... Read More

  1. Visit  Rose_Queen} profile page
    2
    I am absolutely shocked by some of the discussion board postings in my MSN classes. Typos, incorrect words (such as worse vs. worst), mixing up similarly spelled words (they're, their, there; waist, waste; etc.). And these aren't even from people whose native language isn't English. I won't say I'm perfect, but I'd think that people who are writing something for a grade would make the extra effort to proofread.

    I found it quite eye-opening the level of illiteracy in my area and also the amazing number of ways people can find to cover for it. I do find the schools share in the responsibility by teaching to the lowest achievement level in the entire class, but parents are ultimately the ones responsible for their children's education. They are responsible for encouraging learning, helping with homework (but not just doing it), and serving as examples.
    Szasz_is_Right and nguyency77 like this.
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  3. Visit  CT Pixie} profile page
    3
    I have read to my children since the day they were born...literally. Actually, I found myself reading my books out loud when I was pregnant. My children have a love of reading. As they both got a bit older they wanted to read to me or my husband. While they didn't have the ability to actually read at that point, they would 'read' what they saw in the pictures or if no pictures, they would make up stories as they read from the book.

    Both would much rather read a good book than watch tv (thankfully neither like video games) and neither like eBooks, it must be an old fashioned paper book. Both of them have always read many, many grade levels above their actual grade. My 10 year old is reading at a 11th/12th grade level according to her teacher. Last year she was at a 10th grade level.

    It's very sad that in this day and age people still have poor reading skills and cannot comprehend a relatively simple paper.
  4. Visit  Trilldayz,RN BSN} profile page
    2
    great thread! So glad I was (and still am) an avid reader! Another thing that colleges do that essentially "hide" the bad writers: group papers! The worst writers make sure to allow the best writer in the group to take the lead. That's how it was in my nursing school. I'm a strong writer and it would irritate me that the bad writers would send me atrocious work to revise! Then when the final paper is complete, who gets the A? Everybody. Then they get to advance without ever getting the opportunity to write correctly. Group papers are one way bad writing is made undetectable.
    anotherone and Szasz_is_Right like this.
  5. Visit  Ntheboat2} profile page
    0
    I watched an older nurse chart her assessments one day. I was standing behind her and she didn't realize I was watching, but my elementary school aged child is WAY more literate than this nurse was/is. She could not spell even the most simple words. I was absolutely shocked. I would compare her notes to that of a first grader (no kidding). It was as if she spelled everything out the way it sounds. If a first grader and this 50ish or 60ish year old woman both typed up a paper and printed it out, I would not be able to tell which paper belonged to which person. I'm just guessing that she has a disability (maybe dyslexia) that has allowed her to get by all this time. I bet spell check was a life saver for her! That's actually how she gets by with electronic charting. She copies/pastes her notes into a word document, spell checks, and then transfers them back over. It's wild and it takes her FOREVER to chart.
  6. Visit  CheesePotato} profile page
    1
    This video was shown at a conference I attended recently. It's long, but it is worth watching. In fact, every nursing student, every nurse, every doctor should see this video.

    Yeah, it's like that. I promise. Really.

    Thank you, again, Commuter for posting this article and bringing this issue to light.

    TheCommuter likes this.
  7. Visit  nguyency77} profile page
    1
    Thank you for this article. I had no idea how big of an issue illiteracy was in the United States.

    In 11th grade English, I fell in love with The Great Gatsby, The Catcher in the Rye, and Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass.

    It appears that the expectations for my generation are a lot lower than those for previous generations. I am afraid that technology has devalued important skills like reading and writing...And most importantly, it has devalued the importance of literature.
    Szasz_is_Right likes this.
  8. Visit  brillohead} profile page
    1
    Quote from CheesePotato
    This video was shown at a conference I attended recently. It's long, but it is worth watching. In fact, every nursing student, every nurse, every doctor should see this video.

    Yeah, it's like that. I promise. Really.

    Thank you, again, Commuter for posting this article and bringing this issue to light.


    Great minds -- that's the same video I posted earlier!

    It really is worth the watch, people!
    PMFB-RN likes this.
  9. Visit  Catzilla} profile page
    1
    Tl;DR
    anotherone likes this.
  10. Visit  subee} profile page
    1
    The university I attended for my first degree (BA) deducted one letter grade for every spelling or typo in your papers. That gets your attention. Now I know I'm going to get flamed for voting on the side of BSN requirement to take NYCLEX ( a more difficult NYCEX) but all these liberal arts courses, that posters say are irrelevant, force you to use your brain muscle. They force you to reach and stretch to achieve something you'd never do unless it was required. Unfortunately, colleges have abandoned their ethics in order to collect tuition payments from people who didn't get ready for college. Perhaps they should be given a second chance and take a grade 13 (a good return on my tax money) so they can pass the literacy test that should be a requirement for ever college since so many colleges have such lax requirements. Taxpayers have a right to be furious about their dollars going to schools which have abandoned their mission. My personal experience was that a state university was much more rigorous than private school. The state university accepted 3 students for every 2 seats that existed after the first semester. 1/3 of the students were flunked out by second semester and, if they wanted to continue their education, could transfer to one of the less rigorous state colleges. Times have changed for sure. State universities in my state have gained a lot of prestige because they're so competitive. Remember that private schools usually get federal dollars so we have
    every right to demand better standards for their graduates.
    monkeybug likes this.
  11. Visit  ThePrincessBride} profile page
    3
    You should see some of the lecture slides in my class. It is as if my professor doesn't know the difference between "than" or "then" and other basic grammar. As an aspiring novelist, I just shake my head.
  12. Visit  PMFB-RN} profile page
    0
    Quote from subee
    The university I attended for my first degree (BA) deducted one letter grade for every spelling or typo in your papers. That gets your attention. Now I know I'm going to get flamed for voting on the side of BSN requirement to take NYCLEX ( a more difficult NYCEX) but all these liberal arts courses, that posters say are irrelevant, force you to use your brain muscle.
    *** Uh, what is the NYCLEX?
  13. Visit  ThePrincessBride} profile page
    0
    Quote from CT Pixie
    I have read to my children since the day they were born...literally. Actually, I found myself reading my books out loud when I was pregnant. My children have a love of reading. As they both got a bit older they wanted to read to me or my husband. While they didn't have the ability to actually read at that point, they would 'read' what they saw in the pictures or if no pictures, they would make up stories as they read from the book.

    Both would much rather read a good book than watch tv (thankfully neither like video games) and neither like eBooks, it must be an old fashioned paper book. Both of them have always read many, many grade levels above their actual grade. My 10 year old is reading at a 11th/12th grade level according to her teacher. Last year she was at a 10th grade level.

    It's very sad that in this day and age people still have poor reading skills and cannot comprehend a relatively simple paper.
    In my opinion, video games are the top contributors of illiteracy in America. I have an eight-year old cousin who spends HOURS playing violent, wrestling video games. Didn't see ONE book in his room, but there were a bunch of mindless video games on his shelves. He is also "home-schooled" but I doubt he is getting a quality education with those HOURS of hardcore gaming.

    I used to like playing Super Mario, but I honestly would rather read a good book or watch a mind-blowing movie like Cloud Atlas, movies that make you *think*.
  14. Visit  CheesePotato} profile page
    1
    Can I just say that I laughed my butt off at myself for posting a duplicate vid link because someone :cough: ::no eye contact:: didn't read the link in Brillo's post. Apparently. And the fact that I did such a thing in a thread about reading just tickles the bujeezus out of my warped funny bone. Nice. And Brillo......I.....I don't even.....can I just blame acute idiocy?
    bbuerke likes this.


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