Priority questions' level of difficulty is the passing mark!?

  1. 0 Everyone who took NCLEX, passed or not, has in some point of their exams encountered many priority questions. I am thinking that priority questions' level of difficulty is the passing mark.

    If you were able to get priority questions, then you are near the passing mark. If you were given TRIAGE or more difficult questions towards the end of the exam, then you might have surpassed the passing level.

    If you were given basic nursing assessment, planning, implementation towards the end of the exam, then you might have failed it.

    If you answered more priority questions correctly towards the end of the exam, you might have passed or the other way around.
  2. Visit  FutureUSRN profile page

    About FutureUSRN

    38 Years Old; Joined May '06; Posts: 328; Likes: 4.

    41 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  jlgirl82 profile page
    0
    It seems like every person on this site has gotten priority and delegation questions same with what do you do first and who do you call first. I don't think going by these questions is any indication of how well you did lets face it no one can actually state they knew the difficulty level of the questions they were anwsering. and in nursing school they say that alot of the boards is leadership, delegation and so on so that is known before we go into it.
  4. Visit  RNsRWe profile page
    0
    Quote from FutureUSRN
    Everyone who took NCLEX, passed or not, has in some point of their exams encountered many priority questions. I am thinking that priority questions' level of difficulty is the passing mark.

    If you were able to get priority questions, then you are near the passing mark. If you were given TRIAGE or more difficult questions towards the end of the exam, then you might have surpassed the passing level.

    If you were given basic nursing assessment, planning, implementation towards the end of the exam, then you might have failed it.

    If you answered more priority questions correctly towards the end of the exam, you might have passed or the other way around.
    You're trying to pin it down way too much, and you won't be successful at that.

    Yes, priority and delegation tend to be higher level questions because (for the most part) it assumes by a certain point that you have enough knowledge to answer them. Of course, you have to get them right, not just get them

    As far as WHEN you get them, doesn't really matter. You will have 15 pilot questions that are thrown out throughout the first 75 questions of your exam, so they will "throw off" any sort of "order' you may be looking for.

    When these questions show up isn't an indication of anything. Some pilot questions may well fall into the "easier" category and be sprinkled in between some of the "harder" ones.

    Triage questions are, essentially, priority questions. Don't read too much into it
  5. Visit  JenNJFLCA profile page
    0
    I had priority, delegation, infection control, meds, triage, you name it! And they were all over the place. I had "easier" questions towards the end of my exam. It is what it is and there's just no way to rationalize it. I just tried to not even think about the questions I was asked and just told myself, "well, it's done." Then there was the 47 1/2 hour wait. That was the worst part! :trout:
  6. Visit  FutureUSRN profile page
    0
    No, there must be someway to rationalize NCLEX because NCLEX CAT is based on logic and reasons.
  7. Visit  RNsRWe profile page
    1
    You are correct in that it is based on logic and reason. You are incorrect in your assessment of what that logic and reason is, for the reasons I gave you in my response.
    ChemStickPro likes this.
  8. Visit  FutureUSRN profile page
    0
    If my assessment is incorrect, what would be the correct assessment? I assume you know to say mine is wrong.
  9. Visit  EricJRN profile page
    0
    Just because something is based on logic and reason does NOT mean that it's very amenable to analysis from the NCLEX candidates themselves. In other words, the correct assessment (as she said) is that you can't pin things down easily because there are too many unknowns.
  10. Visit  DolphinRN84 profile page
    0
    Eric and RNsRWe are right. There was a thread here awhile ago that someone got 265 questions and had lots of priority BUT THEY STILL FAILED. Any priority question can be an easy or a hard question. Depends how you look at it I guess. But the NCLEX is just a big mystery....
  11. Visit  FutureUSRN profile page
    0
    Actually I am not pinning it down, it's all assumptions. But to say that the assumption is wrong is also wrong unless you know exactly the correct assessment.
  12. Visit  FutureUSRN profile page
    0
    By the way, all along I am saying that everyone gets a lot of priority questions, either he passes or fails.....that's why I am assuming that priority questions are at the level of difficulty near the passing mark.
  13. Visit  EricJRN profile page
    0
    Quote from FutureUSRN
    By the way, all along I am saying that everyone gets a lot of priority questions, either he passes or fails.....that's why I am assuming that priority questions are at the level of difficulty near the passing mark.
    All candidates either pass or fail. I must not be understanding something here.
  14. Visit  FutureUSRN profile page
    0
    Sorry what I meant to say was "All candidates, whether they passed or failed, got a lot a priority questions. Never heard of someone who didn't get a lot of those. That's why I am assuming that priority questions are somewhat near the difficulty of the passing mark.


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