The moments that make LPN school totally worth it...

  1. 27 I'm almost finished with my LPN program, and it's been an exhausting, all-consuming experience. I see my classmates more than my family, I consistently forget that non-nursing students aren't particularly interested in the finer points of c.diff (especially while eating), and oftentimes my clinical experiences are an exercise in how to grit my teeth and put up with nine hours of work I'm PAYING to do. Between two jobs, full-time class and all the stress in my life, sometimes I fantasize about hitting the snooze button in a manner that borders on sexual.

    Today, after working a shift at one job, and then running to the second job (that I actually got through my LPN program) as a sitter/companion at a nursing home, I plopped by the bedside, totally drained, and oriented my patient (again). He's suffering from parkisonian dementia, and on the cusp of complete blindness and deafness. Although I have spent every weekday feeding him dinner, pushing his wheelchair around, devising a hundred different ways to coax him to eat, and singing into his one (semi) good ear, he has never spoken my name and always suspiciously questioned why I come. Even in his moments of clarity, when the fog seems to dim and he can string several thoughts together coherently, he simply can't remember my damned name.

    Before I left for the evening, after giving him his last sip of apple juice, we had a brief exchange. It went as such:

    Patient: Who are you?
    Me: I'm Faith. I'm your dinner date.
    Patient: What?
    Me: Faith.
    Patient: Sage?
    Me: No, Faith.
    Patient: Faith?
    Me: Yes.
    Patient: I can't remember names.
    Me: That's alright, don't worry about it.
    Patient: Your name isn't in my brain, but that's okay, because it's in my heart.

    It only takes a moment to validate your choice in pursuing a nursing career. Hang in there, so you can have some beautifully clarifying moments of your own.
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  3. Visit  nekozuki profile page

    About nekozuki

    Joined Oct '11; Posts: 312; Likes: 672.

    18 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  AmyinNC05 profile page
    0
    Thank you for sharing this. What a wonderful thing for him to say, and I agree...it's things like these that make every second worthwhile & knowing you have made a difference in his life.
  5. Visit  CT Pixie profile page
    9
    I have one very similiar. My very elderly patient had had a stroke, leaving her able to speak (barely, and it was very difficult to understand she was monotone and if you didn't know her you;d think she was cold and mean with her short, unemotional sentences)but although she could speak the stroke left her unable to really smile, smirk, frown etc. One day she told me I had a beautiful smile and that she wished I could see her heart because even though her face didn't show it...her heart smiled when she saw me walking in her room. I got a bit teary eyed with that one. Every time I entered her room after that, she'd give her heart a pat and look at me. And that was my way of knowing she was smiling.

    Sadly she deteriorated very quickly. She was dying..she was in and out of it. My shift was nearing its end and I went into her room one last time to tell her I'd see her soon and I leaned down to give her a gentle hug (I KNEW I'd never see her again). She was barely able to open her eyes but I watched in amazement as she slowly but deliberatly patted her heart and was finally able to somewhat open her eyes to look at me. And I think I'll always remember it. It's been 4 years since she's passed but I remember her like I had just seen her yesterday... Rest Easy Mrs. L!

    Never think the little things don't matter to your patients/residents. A warm smile, a pat on the hand, a gently rub to the back...ALL make a difference. I wish you the best as you continue on your journey.
    WideOpenHeart, bella_, CherylRNBSN, and 6 others like this.
  6. Visit  Whispera profile page
    1
    wow, what wonderful stories!
    CT Pixie likes this.
  7. Visit  seanynjboy profile page
    1
    Thanks for sharing this It made me smile I needed that...
    CT Pixie likes this.
  8. Visit  ElSea profile page
    1
    This made my night.
    CT Pixie likes this.
  9. Visit  ElSea profile page
    1
    Quote from CT Pixie
    I have one very similiar. My very elderly patient had had a stroke, leaving her able to speak (barely, and it was very difficult to understand she was monotone and if you didn't know her you;d think she was cold and mean with her short, unemotional sentences)but although she could speak the stroke left her unable to really smile, smirk, frown etc. One day she told me I had a beautiful smile and that she wished I could see her heart because even though her face didn't show it...her heart smiled when she saw me walking in her room. I got a bit teary eyed with that one. Every time I entered her room after that, she'd give her heart a pat and look at me. And that was my way of knowing she was smiling. Sadly she deteriorated very quickly. She was dying..she was in and out of it. My shift was nearing its end and I went into her room one last time to tell her I'd see her soon and I leaned down to give her a gentle hug (I KNEW I'd never see her again). She was barely able to open her eyes but I watched in amazement as she slowly but deliberatly patted her heart and was finally able to somewhat open her eyes to look at me. And I think I'll always remember it. It's been 4 years since she's passed but I remember her like I had just seen her yesterday... Rest Easy Mrs. L!Never think the little things don't matter to your patients/residents. A warm smile, a pat on the hand, a gently rub to the back...ALL make a difference. I wish you the best as you continue on your journey.
    So did this. Thank you.
    CT Pixie likes this.
  10. Visit  pokeme25 profile page
    2
    I am on the edge of tears reading these stories. It really shows that the things nurses do are actually appreciated. I can't wait until I graduate and I am able to share my own stories!!! I'm looking forward to it!!! Keep up the good work nurses!!!
    michelle24 and CT Pixie like this.
  11. Visit  Jazziepants profile page
    7
    I took a man for a walk and showed him around the facility. It is a very pretty facility. We walked and talked for about half an hour. We got back to the room and he gave me a hug and started to cry thanking me because i was the first person who didn't treat his walk like a chore and made him feel like he had a friend.
    WideOpenHeart, ElSea, michelle24, and 4 others like this.
  12. Visit  OnlybyHisgraceRN profile page
    0
    Such a sweet story. Wishing you well in LPN school. I thoroughly enjoyed working as a LPN in LTC. I loved the residents. Moments like these made my days easier.
  13. Visit  bsyrn profile page
    1
    awwww, I loved that
    CT Pixie likes this.
  14. Visit  jaycee15 profile page
    1
    I'm in tears! I feel so sad going into ltcs but coming out and knowing I made a difference in someones life is what I live for
    Whispera likes this.
  15. Visit  tparker17234 profile page
    1
    Wow! You guys shared amazing stories! I can't wait to become a nurse.
    ElSea likes this.


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