Why Does It Seem That RN's Hate Us and Hospitals Don't Believe In Us?? - page 9

Im a new PN grad and have been a STNA (state tested nurse assistant) for 7 years; but as a graduate it seems that RN's are threatened by PN's or feel that we don't know anything and hospitals dont... Read More

  1. by   RN34TX
    Quote from Tweety
    I guess it depends on where you are. There are two LPN to RN programs here and only one RN to BSN. If look look at the next city it's two more LPN to RN and two more RN to BSN. Online programs for RN to BSN are more abundant however, but there is always that option for LPN to RNs.

    I think the LPN to RN programs are probably more intense because of the clinical time. So it's definately more difficult to go LPN to RN and that's not always an option for a working person with a life and families.

    As long as the state board, JACHO, ANA, etc. believe that there is a difference between RNs and LPNs, there's going to be a difference of opinion that LPNs do the same thing at the same level as RNs. As long as LPNs are willing to go into hospitals and do the same job as RNs and take that salary doing the same thing, then hospitals are going to take advantage of them. I'm appalled at the salaries some of my co-workers make (as a charge nurse I'm privy to that) with the responsibilities and experience they have.

    Where I work there is the rare anti-LPN sentiment between the staff nurses, not much. I do see probably more anti-RN sentiment from the LPNs. Probably because the hospital has put a freeze on hiring more LPNs, but the ones who are there get to stay. Techs who better their education and become LPNs are forced to work somewhere else no matter how many years they put in there. But on a day-to-day basis, we're all just struggling to do our jobs.

    I'm not understanding why you're shooting down RN's that try to have a sense of team spirit by saying "we're all on one team". Some of RNs truly feel that way. Just because we have RN behind our name doesn't automatically make of one of those LPN haters. Some of us despite the controversy around us, don't hate, want to make the best of our work situation and work together, without a feeling of superiority, but one of respect. I'll never forget as a newbie RN how several LPNs took me under their wing and helped me out, even though I was the "team leader" by virtue of my RN, they didn't let me sink, they showed me the ropes and shared their experience. I've never forgotten that.
    The "we're all on one team" comment wasn't an attempt to slight people who really feel that way. I think that's great.
    I was referring to comments made here that literally deny that the sentiment exists and that we all get along in harmony. If that were true, these threads wouldn't come up.
    Or that if it doesn't exist on their particular unit, then it must not exist at all. In addition, if you're not an LPN yourself, you may not see it even though it may go on where you work.

    There are no LVN's on any units where I work either. So therefore, I could easily claim that the sentiment doesn't exist at my workplace because we never have to deal with it. However, I'm not foolish enough to believe that some of my co-workers wouldn't act that way in the event that LVN's did start getting hired and we all had to work alongside them.

    It's like living in a small all-caucasian town in middle America and claiming that no one is prejudice. Of course not. It never surfaces until a minority family moves in.

    As far as the access and availability of LPN to RN vs. RN to BSN programs goes, the two cannot be compared by numbers alone. Your town could have 10 LPN to RN programs and only one RN to BSN program and it's still not as easy for them.

    Most are full time "all or nothing" programs forcing LPN's to either cut their work hours down, or basically get about two hours of sleep per day.

    I know that some will claim passionately that it can be done and will go on and on about how that had two jobs and went to school full time with three kids to feed and care for, but that's not a realistic option for most.
    Part-time and flexible scheduling options for LPN's wanting to become RN's is severely limited in every area I've ever lived.
    Most RN to BSN programs are designed for a full time working RN and more flexibility is involved.

    As far as online options go, again, the two cannot be compared.
    First of all, online RN to BSN programs are multiplying by the hour. Most B&M state universities are moving more and more toward online options for RN's.

    There are relatively few online or distance options for LPN's wanting to become RN's. Even the current distance/online options are often under attack by state boards resulting in LPN's having even fewer mobility options.
  2. by   Tweety
    RN34TX, thanks for clarifying. Obviously saying there is no animosity against LPNs is wrong and not true. Just as it isn't true, as the title of this thread states "Why do RNs hate us". Blanket statements one way or another is wrong.

    I acknowledge it's more difficult to go LPN to RN than RN to BSN. I acknowledged that when I said it was "more intense", as intense as going to an ADN program. While RN to BSN isn't a piece of cake by any stretch of the imagination, I give LPN to RN their props, that is indeed more difficult and less readily available.

    I didn't mean to imply that it wasn't. I was merely acknowledging the number of programs in this area are equal. The only LPNs I know going RN are those I work with and a friend of mine. They all keep working their 3 12-hour shifts.

    I do acknowledge RN to BSN programs are growing by leaps and bounds in the online community and they are catered to the working nurse. I didn't mean to imply that distance LPN programs were widely available and acceptable, just that it is indeed an option for some.
  3. by   RN34TX
    Quote from Tweety
    While RN to BSN isn't a piece of cake by any stretch of the imagination,
    Amen to that. A few extra fluff classes, it ain't! (Like some have characterized BSN programs to be)
    My nose is definitely to the grindstone this semester. (and the potter's wheel for that matter.)

    Regarding your other comments, I totally agree. Blanket statements on either end is definitely an issue here and I can sometimes be guilty of it as well.
  4. by   tryingtomakeit
    I have a "sort of funny" story to share.

    My family had a reunion this past weekend. Among the crowd were my cousin from Lousiana and his wife. I hadn't seen them in years and the last time they saw me I was a CNA. I have since graduated from nursing school (RN). To make a long story short, my cousin, who is also a CNA, asked where I was working. I told her, but it didn't register with me that she thought I was still a CNA until her husband looked me square in the eye and said, "Tell me, do they make all the RN's here take a--hole courses like they do at home. They are ALL -itches!"

    I just smiled and said, "Pass the baked beans ..."

    Also I want to add that when I first graduated a couple of years ago, there was an LPN working in post partum who I learned most of my skills from. Not only my technical skills, but also my assessment skills. I felt so funny having to sign after her on careplans. She taught me more than I ever learned in nursing school! Granted, she has been a nurse for twenty - plus years, but she made me realize that we ALL contribute and we ARE a team.
  5. by   NrsJena
    As an LPN- I can truely say I have either never encountered this whole RN vs. LPN thing, or my attention has been draw elsewhere! I have worked in LTC, hospitals and homecare. The bottom line is: a good nurse is a good nurse. And a good team is a good team- all that matters at the end of the day is the care we were able to give the patients we were assigned to care for.

    I am returning to get my RN- NOT because I feel that as an LPN I am doing less. But as an RN-I can do more. Does that make sense?
  6. by   ms_orion
    amen!!! In response to post from Nrs Jena (above post)
    Last edit by ms_orion on Apr 26, '06
  7. by   ms_orion
    amen!!! (in response to nrsjena's post)
  8. by   Tweety
    Quote from RN34TX
    Amen to that. A few extra fluff classes, it ain't! (Like some have characterized BSN programs to be)
    My nose is definitely to the grindstone this semester. (and the potter's wheel for that matter.)

    Amen indeed.

    Don't you love it when you read "the only difference between an ADN degree and BSN degree is a few liberal arts courses"
  9. by   frodo
    I have worked in a community hospital 4 years now, I am in my early 50's. I have worked with people, some who are very good nurses and some who are sadly needing a lot of help, these were LPN's and RN's both. You are correct that the state and the hospital also stop LPN's from doing some things an RN can do. I do assessments, read the Dr's orders, chart pie , admit pts. give meds, except for blood products, or pushes. I do all my own i.v. sticks as well as most of the other nurses. They have stopped hiring LPN's at this hosp. I do not want to go on for RN, due to my age as well as my husband having had cancer a few years ago, time is precious to me now, and i don't want to use it to get RN for the money. I feel i am an integral part of my team and most staff gets along very well, there are those who don't and it doesn't take the title to do this. Some people just don't like each other, no matter who you are. When I go home I feel good about what i have done. I hope you all do.
  10. by   jrlpn
    When I started as a new LVN in Cali the majority of supervisory positions were all RN's, they used as ordered via state board of nursing to supervise all Lvn's Lpn's. My experience overall positive until I moved to Atlanta Ga. Then the hate relationship started, white,black(+)asian,span., mexican whatever. RN's the majority were arrogant, poor leadership qualities and in positions they truly should have not been in because of the lack of skills needed to be assuring,positive,and professional with their co-workers (lpn'). I have only expierenced a hand count on one hand of total ethical behavior of secured,positive,and passionant registered nurses in Georgia. I have been blocked from Emory and Grady clinics due to unorthodox and charactor depleating behaviors from these people. I only pray to God almightly to forgive them that judged me because of my opinionated type, not in a negative sence, my secured behavior, in which they only judged me do to the fact I am Lpn person last. At 57 yrs of age I been a Lpn for 27 yrs and practice as taught in school on ethics. Don't mean to be negative, but, this has been the most horrible exp. the past 12 yrs here in Ga. dealing with so many misfits with positions. Sad.
  11. by   RN34TX
    jrlpn-
    Don't apologize for being negative. I can relate to much of what you've stated and I'm sure that others can as well.

    Unfortunately, many RN programs do not teach the "leadership" type of skills that you are referring to. (I didn't say all everyone)

    The result is nurses being promoted to leadership type positions by virtue of their degree atttained, and perhaps other factors such as having worked in a particular hospital for 100 years or being an administrator's friend or little pet.

    We all know that way too many nurses get promoted for all the wrong reasons.

    I would bet that most of us get our leadership skills via role models at work. If you don't have good role models, you could end up becoming one of the same toxic nurse managers that once bullied and terrorized you and your old unit.

    I've heard very few GA nurses complaining about the "Good old boys club" mentality that seems to be so prominent in TX but your story sounds similar to many in the Lone Star State.
  12. by   flwannaB
    I hate to sound rude but is this post ever going to end? It all sounds like a bunch of whinning and boo hooing to me. All I have to say is, if you don't respect yourself then no one else will. Who cares if RN's hate LPN's or MSN or BSN or CNA's. :uhoh21: Be proud and confident of what you are and what you do for your patients. Everyone has a place in life and you all should be happy where you are. If not, do what ever it takes to change it. Everyone needs to just get over it and do their job. Life is too short to worry about what everyone else thinks. We are here to serve each other. That is why we got into the field.
  13. by   flwannaB
    My apologies if this reply sounded rude and insensitive. I meant no disrespect to anyone.
    Quote from flwannaB
    I hate to sound rude but is this post ever going to end? It all sounds like a bunch of whinning and boo hooing to me. All I have to say is, if you don't respect yourself then no one else will. Who cares if RN's hate LPN's or MSN or BSN or CNA's. :uhoh21: Be proud and confident of what you are and what you do for your patients. Everyone has a place in life and you all should be happy where you are. If not, do what ever it takes to change it. Everyone needs to just get over it and do their job. Life is too short to worry about what everyone else thinks. We are here to serve each other. That is why we got into the field.

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