Why do so many people insist that LPN'S AREN'T REAL NURSES!!?? - page 14

I mean, the title does have "Nurse" in it.So why are so many people insisting that LPN's arent real nurses? When I go to the hospital, I see these people giving medication , care, comfort and other... Read More

  1. by   SillyLilly
    Quote from nighteyes719
    last I knew both LPN and RN , had to both take the state boards,
    LPN is Licensed Practical NURSE, & RN is Registered NURSE . Where are you getting the REAL in RN, WE both went to school and we both have LICENSE to keep up . And we both care for the sick and the dieing, IS that not why we went into nursing to take care of patients. I HAVE NEVER HAD A DIEING PATIENT OR THEIR FAMILY TELL ME THEY DID NOT WANT ME TO HELP THEM AND HOLD THEIR MOTHERS HAND, BECAUSE I WAS NOT A REAL NURSE .

    I was kidding. Seriously. Dont think there is a difference and I agree with you and most of the posts.

    When I was in school, people asked what RN stood for. Someone assumed Real Nurse. Thought it was funny, though irelevant to the dif between LPNs and RNs. I can tell you that I nor they know much of a difference if we were patients on the floor between an LPN and an RN.
    Last edit by SillyLilly on Sep 25, '06
  2. by   DusktilDawn
    edited in error. Member notified.
    Last edit by Tweety on Sep 25, '06
  3. by   Tweety
    Quote from Annabelle~nurseygirl
    How can an RN claim to be responsible for another nurses pt load when the extent of their responsibility is IV pushes or mixing meds.

    um.........in Florida it's called the Nurse Practice Act and the responsibility is more than just pushing meds and spiking your blood........on paper that is. In the day to day activity the LPN whose name is beside mine on the schedule and I don't interact all that much because we are busy with our own stuff (here they do their own IV pushes). However, there still is the matter that on a saved document there's documentation of who the RN is assigned to this person.

    The good thing is that here in Florida one rarely hears about an RN getting into trouble for what an LPN does, or what the other RNs they are in charge of either for that matter. There is personal accountability that weighs in more.
    Last edit by Tweety on Sep 25, '06
  4. by   nedrager
    I was an LPN/LVN for several years in the ER. Let me tell you, I was looked at as a "real nurse". Especially when it got busy people could never remember whether you were an RN or LPN. Funny how that works eh?
  5. by   walkiez
    Most of these posts are from LPNs defending their position. Are there any RNs out there ready to defend LPNs?

    Im an LPN doing my RN. Personally i consider LPNs nurses but not to the degree of RNs. We lack education. Fair enough that with experience we will eventially acquire knowledge but RNs know (should know) way more.

    I think most of you out there are looking for confirmation that LPNs are just as good as RNs....but we're not.

    RNs receive douple the education (sometime more) of an LPN.

    Of course LPNs are nurses, we've got Nurse in our title but if you're looking for equality your not going to find it.
  6. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from Annabelle~nurseygirl
    You are not the best at interpreting, are you? 41 years ago! give me a break. And yes, lots of facilities are doing away with LPNs, just because someone made an offhanded statement to you, don't quote that nonsense as factual.
    Tweety has my views on the subject right and my interpretation of the ANA is correct: they polarized nursing with their 1965 position paper, an opinion they still hold today.

    If you reread that post, my interpretation was right on the money: propaganda. I wish I could say that the way most RN programs teach this WAS and is off-handed - but instead, I fear that it is more systematic.

    I came right through the ranks: CNA, LPN, RN, Bach Degree (purposely not in nursing).

    In reality, education is important. So is experience. They are twins just like the old nature/nurture debate.

    I've worked in places where the only NURSES I would want to take care of my family were the LVNs on that unit. But, I think education is important, also. I would encourage all LVNs/LPNs to go get their RN - not in a patronizing way, but in order to get the dollars you deserve.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Sep 25, '06
  7. by   General E. Speaking, RN
    I'm pretty sure my patient that I transferred to ICU yesterday isn't concerned that I am not an RN considering it was my LVN critical assessment skills that recognized and acted on his rapidly dropping BP, increasing lethargy and confusion...turns out he was septic.
  8. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Most of these posts are from LPNs defending their position. Are there any RNs out there ready to defend LPNs?
    By reading all the posts, one could see that there were plenty of RNs that have defended LPN here.
  9. by   Plagueis
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    First, the ANA doesn't consider LPN/LVNs to be nurses for purposes of membership. You cannot be a member of the ANA as a LPN/LVN. How can it be the American NURSES Association if LPN/LVNs don't belong? Or rather, their exclusion speaks to their position on the issue.

    2nd, their 1965 position paper on nursing education actively advocated for the ELIMINATION of the LPN/LVN role and reducing ADNs to THAT role. Sorry moderator that said to keep the ADN/BSN out of it: but it is on point. This issue began it's official sanction with the pivotal polarizing ANA concept of differentiation of practices. That ANA's model did not see LPN/LVN as being a part of that differentiation, or practice.


    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    I've also wondered how an organization could call themselves the ANA since LPNs cannot become members. They should just change their name to the American Registered Nurses Association. Also, since their position paper on nursing education promoted the bachelor's degree, do they only allow bachelor-degree RNs to become members? I can't imagine eliminating the LPN role. As I've learned by working in long-term care, they are a vital and hardworking part of the healthcare team.
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I've also wondered how an organization could call themselves the ANA since LPNs cannot become members. They should just change their name to the American Registered Nurses Association.
    I don't get that either. It almost seems like a form of false advertising.
  11. by   Nurset1981
    Lord I am so sick of hearing that..."Lets Play nurse" I have to say I am a very educated LPN. I went through an intense program and graduated president and ranked high in my class. I was 18. I passed my exam 2 weeks after my 19th birthday and took a job as a 3-11 charge nurse in a SNF. I've had a great career with a lot of experience, but theres always one person at every job that I feel like I have to prove myself to.
  12. by   RN34TX
    Quote from Tommybabe
    I've also wondered how an organization could call themselves the ANA since LPNs cannot become members. They should just change their name to the American Registered Nurses Association. Also, since their position paper on nursing education promoted the bachelor's degree, do they only allow bachelor-degree RNs to become members?
    They should change their name to "The American Bachelors degree prepared Registered Nurses Association" and their motto should be:

    "When you get a "real" degree and become a "real" nurse, you can join our elite club."
    LOL!

    It does, however, surprise me how many ADN RN's are members and support the organization when their position is clearly anti-anything "less" than a BSN.

    When I was an LPN, I tried to join a men in nursing professional organization. I think it was called something like the "American Assembly for Men in Nursing" or something similar.

    I found out that LPN's could only be "honorary" or some other substandard category of members without full voting priviliges and otherwise within the organization. They actually placed limits on an LPN member's ability to become active within the organization.

    That was nearly 10 years ago or so and things could have changed since then. But I have no interest in becoming involved with them again as it left a bad taste in my mouth.

    The division between RN and LPN within an organization geared toward the advancement of men in the profession somehow seemed counter-productive and ironic.
  13. by   rebel1
    There has been times in my 31 years as a LVN that I would turn my badge around because I was ashamed of just being a LVN- now I keep that badge front and center and I will gladly tell anyone who asks what the difference between a RN and LVN. The degree does not make the person- showing compassion is what counts. It does not hurt to keep up with your education and make sure that you are knowledgeable, but sometimes giving a good backrub works better than giving drugs.

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