phasing out? - page 3

Hello I am six weeks into LPN school and when ever people see me in uniform and ask what I do, they tell me hospitals are going to start phasing LPNs out. These are people in healthcare that tell... Read More

  1. by   Little Panda RN
    There does not seem to be any phasing out of LPN's here in my neck of the woods. There are many jobs in hospitals and other areas of nursing. There has been talk that the board of nursing is going to expand the scope of practice for LPN's. As it stands now, the LPN's do "almost" as much as the RN's. LPN's can hang and monitor blood, initiate pheriperal lines, push meds through central and PICC lines. But on the flip side we can not push a vasoactive drug through any line. Most places here require that the LPN have their associates degree and they are paid 8.00 hour less than RN's. I think LPN's will be around for the long haul. The education for LPN's will keep expanding just as it is for our RN counterparts. Just my 2 cents.
  2. by   Throcky27
    I am a new LPN graduate and what I see in GA is the medical assistant seems to be creeping in on the LPN. Alot of ads say LPN or MA some say no LPN's please. My daughter-in-law is an RN at a local hospital that has stopped hiring LPN, at least for now. Some of my friends from school worked at the same hospital and after graduating are now having to look for a job elsewhere because they are not hiring LPN's. But on the upside another hospital where I did some of my clinicals are still hiring LPN's and I think I may have a job there. Unfortunately they are very slow with the hiring process.
  3. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from TheCommuter
    It seems that you are specifically seeking a position in a hospital or doctors' office. The vast majority of LPN job opportunities are to be found in nursing homes and other LTCFs.
    Listen to TheCommuter.

    I am in a rural area and we use LPN's, NP's and PA's a lot. Get to an urban area and you don't see 'em. Same with LPN's, except in LTC and doctor's offices.
  4. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from nd_mom
    There does not seem to be any phasing out of LPN's here in my neck of the woods. There are many jobs in hospitals and other areas of nursing. There has been talk that the board of nursing is going to expand the scope of practice for LPN's. As it stands now, the LPN's do "almost" as much as the RN's. LPN's can hang and monitor blood, initiate pheriperal lines, push meds through central and PICC lines. But on the flip side we can not push a vasoactive drug through any line. Most places here require that the LPN have their associates degree and they are paid 8.00 hour less than RN's. I think LPN's will be around for the long haul. The education for LPN's will keep expanding just as it is for our RN counterparts. Just my 2 cents.
    It is shocking to me to hear that LPNs in your state make only $8 less than an RN. What state do you live in? And, out of curiousity, does the LPN have to have special certification to hang blood or is it automatically included within their scope of practice? Here in New York, we have to be specially certified to hang blood. No IV push, and we don't touch central or PICC lines. It's so fascinating to hear how each state varies. I'd think that for $8 more an hour, I'd be overwhelmed with all of that responsibility; but it may be because I see a vast difference in pay between PNs and RNs here in my state. Here in New York City, most RNs begin with about $62,000 to start verses about $36-42,000 for the LPN.
  5. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    It is shocking to me to hear that LPNs in your state make only $8 less than an RN.
    At my facility in DFW, Texas, the LVNs start at $18 hourly and the RNs start at $23 hourly. Therefore, there's only a $5 per hour difference between the LVN and RN pay rates. In addition, the LVN scope of practice is rather wide in Texas. We're allowed to flush PICC lines and do IV therapy, but we are not allowed to hang blood.
  6. by   nursesands
    here in tennessee LPNs are mostly used in LTc, corrections, or MD offices. Our pay is grossly small compared to the RNs. our average starting pay is around $15 to $16 per hour whereas RNs are starting around $28 to $30. i dont understand the thinking of healthcare facilities. With the nursing shortage growing every day, I would think that they would appreciate the work and training that LPNs give.
  7. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from TheCommuter
    At my facility in DFW, Texas, the LVNs start at $18 hourly and the RNs start at $23 hourly. Therefore, there's only a $5 per hour difference between the LVN and RN pay rates. In addition, the LVN scope of practice is rather wide in Texas. We're allowed to flush PICC lines and do IV therapy, but we are not allowed to hang blood.
    Again, I find this to be absolutely fascinating. There is such a pay gap with the LPNs and RNs in New York City, that I can see why a person would wish to go further (not saying that there is no reason to do in other geographical areas), but to see that the difference is not that much, yet having even more responsibility and accountability in other states would make me have to ponder. I had a friend who wanted to move to Virginia, but changed her mind when she saw what RNs were getting paid there compared to here. But, the cost of living is cheaper in other places and you get more for your money. Here in New York, rents and mortgages for these matchboxes would enrage you. We do IV therapy in New York, but the trick is that it is not mandated by our state BON, but it can be mandated by your particular facility; hence, I am IV certified, just in case I want to work in house. But, we don't interfere with central or PICC lines. With additional training, we can hang blood, also, but again, it is not mandated by the state, but if an LPN worked in the ER my facility, she would be mandated to inservice and certification to hang blood.
  8. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from nursesands
    here in tennessee LPNs are mostly used in LTc, corrections, or MD offices. Our pay is grossly small compared to the RNs. our average starting pay is around $15 to $16 per hour whereas RNs are starting around $28 to $30. i dont understand the thinking of healthcare facilities. With the nursing shortage growing every day, I would think that they would appreciate the work and training that LPNs give.
    Interesting. Starting pay for LPNs here may be about the same as an RN in your state. I get paid about $20 an hour at my job at the hospital, and anywhere from $25-30 per hour doing home care. RNs start with about $62,000 per year to start. Most of our city hospitals take on LPNs, but the pay is less. Since I am a new nurse, I can deal with that for the experience, but would eventually leave for greener and more peaceful pastures.
  9. by   General E. Speaking, RN
    I'm in Texas. Me and one other nurse are the only LVNs on days. There are few more on nights. I work Med-Surg in an acute care facility. We have been hiring boat-loads of RN's and no LVNs. Well, I did hear a rumor that they hired one LVN...

    Most of us are going to school to get our RN. A lot of it has to to with the scope of practice. LVN's take the same assignments as RNs (sometimes harder because the charge says the seasoned LVNs can "handle" it). Few things we can't do. For blood transfusions: We need at least one RN in the beginning of the transfusion and for the two nurse blood check- but I do everything else- call the doc, get the order, get the consent, pick up the blood, educate and monitor my patient during the transfusion. I can't administer IV narcs/cardiac meds, can't access a PAC, I need a RN to assess new admissions and few other things I'm sure I'm forgetting at the moment.

    It is frustrating for me to have to get the RN to do my job so I am back in school. I figure I am almost doing the same work so I should go back to school and get the pay/job opportunities. I am ready to be financially compensated for my years of experience.
  10. by   vangar
    They tried that in San Antonio, Texas and when they realized that it was impossible to so they went back to having LPN staffed in hospitals. So, don't get discouraged .
  11. by   kstec
    I'm a recent LPN graduate and I am just curious if the RN's were always held accountable for LPN's or did the accountable/liability just increase over the years. I guess my question is were LPN's able to be more independent in the past? I can completely understand if everything ultimately falls on the RN, but are we as LPN's also responsible? We do carry our own liabilty insurance. I was asked to come work on the only unit in our hospital and I just couldn't bring myself to do it. I felt as though not only would I be intimidated because I was a new graduate but also because I wasn't really wanted there anyway. I definitely know that I am not a RN but would like to be given a chance to do what is in my scope of practice. Oh well maybe things will eventually change.

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