LPN'S are NURSES TOO - page 3

We, LPN'S need to speak up more and grab the attention of administrators,Legislators, (State and Federal) Governors ,the public and anybody else who views the RN as the only true nurse. Just the same... Read More

  1. by   RN34TX
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    I believe that when the commercials and advertisements stated "Get a REAL nurse", they neglected to state that Licensed Practical Nurses are nurses as well, and maybe it should have been stated that any LICENSED person that passed NCLEX-PN/RN IS, in fact, a NURSE.
    I saw those commercials as well but I definitely don't believe that they "neglected" to state anything in their message.
    Their message was very clear to me.

    There was no doubt in my mind that when they stated "You deserve to be taken care of by a real nurse" that they most definitely were referring to RN's exclusively.

    I took offense to it because I felt that the implications were that if you were being taken care of by anyone other than an RN (i.e. LPN/LVN) that you as a patient "deserve better than that".

    Commercials like that do little more than confuse the public even more than they already are in addition to being completely counterproductive in the effort toward advancement of the profession.
  2. by   Fiona59
    I've never seen the commerical you all are talking about up here in Canada. But some of the provincial RN associations appear to be taking notes from it. "Educated, professional, caring -- Registered Nurses" That kind of thing.

    Over the years, the only time I've ever been asked if I'm an RN its by family members never the patient and the family is usually taken aback when I say Licensed. When asked why I'm not registered, I usually reply that "I'm proud to be an LPN and I don't discuss my private life at work". I've then informed them that a PN has four semesters of education at college and pointed them to a brochure my union has printed up on LPNs. Usually keeps them busy and lets me finish my care.
  3. by   imnrs2
    I agree with you of blatant reference in commercials that RN's are the only real nurses. It does present a mindset that is the only true worthy nurse.LPN's left out of equation thus the public ,corporate,legal view . Johnson and Johnson's commercial "I'm a nurse" and shows RN's only. Goes further to state be a nurse. Leaving LPN as floating around in the mind as just there and tolerated. But LPN's know there abilities and do a spectacular job and we make a difference in our residents /pts live
  4. by   imnrs2
    Quote from napnes
    I have to agree completely with the initial post with one minor exception. As an individual it is very difficult to get to regulators, this is the job of professional associations. As Jules put it, it is important to join your professional association. For example, an individual LPN will never be invited to attend and serve on a panel of all the boards of nursing, but we are.

    Professional associations provide research, standards, and much more. While you may not recognize it in your daily work, your professional association is responsible for the fact that you are a "nurse" and have a career.

    NAPNES (National Association for Practical Nurse Education and Service) has been around since 1941. We represent LPNs / LVNs, PN Schools, students and educators. We just recently created a new eMembership which is just $35.00 for LPNs/LVNs and just $10.00 for students.

    Right now, NAPNES is working on updating National PN Education Standards, conducting a nationwide survey of the LPN/LVN and their role in infusion therapy, our executive director is a paenlist for the National Council State Board of Nursing's "Transition Summit" that will be held next month in Chicago.

    Back to standards for a minute, when the association has approved the national education standards, NAPNES Council of Practical Nurse Educators will create new curricula standards. Rest assured, we are including assesment, infusion therapy and more. In fact, it was NAPNES that got pharmacology as part of every LPN program and that work began in the 1960s.

    So stand-up because yes you are a nurse and your license says just that!!!! But remember, the best way for us to stick together and make sure that our profession grows and continues is to support your professional association.

    To find out more about NAPNES, go to our website at www.napnes.org!
    Reference that the professional organization is the only way to exact real change. Not so, we LPN's need to speak out in a loud voice what we want and we can call legislators ,media,etc. and put in motion what we want and deserve.This would be working with the organizations that can come up with policies for the betterment of the LPN ONLY.......
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    You have a point, there. It does imply that anything less than an LPN is garbage, and it can even make a person that doesn't know any better feel disrespected to obtain an LPN rather than an RN even partially responsible for their care.

    Quote from RN34TX
    I saw those commercials as well but I definitely don't believe that they "neglected" to state anything in their message.
    Their message was very clear to me.

    There was no doubt in my mind that when they stated "You deserve to be taken care of by a real nurse" that they most definitely were referring to RN's exclusively.

    I took offense to it because I felt that the implications were that if you were being taken care of by anyone other than an RN (i.e. LPN/LVN) that you as a patient "deserve better than that".

    Commercials like that do little more than confuse the public even more than they already are in addition to being completely counterproductive in the effort toward advancement of the profession.
  6. by   TrickieTam
    Wanna know what makes the public really think you aren't a real nurse? Hospitals that hire only RNs. Our hospital only staffs LPNs in retirement communities and the skilled nursing facility wing here. Like they are saying you are better qualified to work for the people that are more predictable in knowing their outcome.
  7. by   DarciaMoonz
    I am a GPN, and already am tired of not being seen as a "real nurse". I am proud of my accomplishment and have worked just as hard to get through the PNEP as anyone who has gone through the RNEP. although I don't have the "L" yet to go with the other two letters, I AM A NURSE!!!! And damn proud of it.
  8. by   RN BSN 2009
    yes... an LPN IS a nurse too! That's where the "N" comes from!
  9. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from TrickieTam
    Wanna know what makes the public really think you aren't a real nurse? Hospitals that hire only RNs. Our hospital only staffs LPNs in retirement communities and the skilled nursing facility wing here. Like they are saying you are better qualified to work for the people that are more predictable in knowing their outcome.
    Well, actually, the main description for the LPN (at least here in New York State) is that we are to care for basically stable clients with predictable outcomes. That is what attracted me to practical nursing in opposed to registered nursing. I was not interested in ER, Critical Care, ICU, or really any specialties.
  10. by   vonxojn
    It's not just RN's that look down on LPN but it's MD's as well. I had an MD write and order for an RN to check NGT residual on MY patient. First of all who do u think put the d-mn thing in... duhhhh. So now u want an RN to check the residual. Give me a break... Needless to say that particular MD was not my favorite.... I truely believe now more than ever, we as LPN's have to be more proactive in our career's. Some LPN's I have came across have told RN's,"I'm just an LPN". STOP IT! :flamesonb If u act like ur worth nothing, they'll treat u like nothing!!!!! I'm going back to school to be an RN and I would NEVER make an LPN feel like she/he is not a nurse. I was a CNA for 8 years and when I became a nurse, I treated my CNA's the way that they should be treated-part of the team.
  11. by   NurseCubanitaRN2b
    As a CNA I can honestly say that the best nurses I've worked with are LVN's (I'm in California)...I remember when I was working in the long term care unit where a patient was choking on a chicken nuggest. As we were passing out the dinner trays a CNA was calling for help and when I looked up I could see him holding a tray in one hand and a patient in the other. I immediately ran to help him....Then the LVN's called stat, and here come the RN's....Those RN's had NO IDEA what to do...Being just a CNA I told them, shouldn't somebody be doing the heimlich maneuver (CNA weren't allowed to do HM or CP in that facility)....so what do the RN's do? They let him gently down to the ground while they try to pump each side of him abdomen with the index and middle finger....I was like WTH is that....then one of the LVN's came over and did the heimlich while he was lying flat on his back. Thank GOD for that LVN or else what type of citation would the facility have received. Don't get me wrong, I work with some great RN's now who actually help put patients on the bedpan, and answer call lights....The nurses (LVN/RN) really treat the aides like we're worth something at the facility that I'm working at.

    I think it's horrible how people treat LVN's like their 2nd class citizens or something. They go to school a semester shorter than an RN does here in one of the local community colleges...They have the same prerequisites that RN's do except that the LVN course is narrower in scope.
  12. by   skittlebear
    Quote from tatgirl
    I too am a proud nurse. Right now I have no desire to get my RN. I am proud to be a LPN and a valuable member of the healthcare team. We are all NURSES regardless of the initials after our names.

    Wendy
    LPN
    DITTO TO THAT!!!
  13. by   kk2000
    I think a contributing factor in the confusion about LPN's is the huge differences in the LPN scope in different states.
    Some states do not allow LPN's to even pass narcotics, nor can they do Iv's, hang blood etc.
    Here in Florida, we can do IV's, and even hang blood if there is an RN on the property. Just a few examples.
    So, I think that with some states limitations on scope of practice, makes some of the RN's and others believe that we are not as "valuable"?
    Just a thought.
    Perhaps there should be more available trainings and certifications for the PN.

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