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Applying to Nursing School - Making the Cut

Applying to Nursing School - Making the Cut

by oldsockventriloquist - This article is written for, but not exclusively to, those who are lacking in one or more aspects of their nursing school application. When applying to nursing school, please don't feel discouraged...

New BSN with 4 years School Nurse experience as ADN - Can't land a hospital job.

New BSN with 4 years School Nurse experience as ADN - Can't land a hospital job.

by Nurse Beth - Hi Nurse Beth, I would appreciate advice with regards to applying for a hospital position. After graduating with my ADN, I accepted a position as a school nurse and have worked for my school...

Nurse Amanda's Terrible, Horrible Day & the Case for Emotional Intelligence

Nurse Amanda's Terrible, Horrible Day & the Case for Emotional Intelligence

by BethBoynton - Can We Help Amanda Survive Her Nursing Career? Or her Day? By Beth Hawkes and Beth Boynton Amanda is desperately trying to get through her shift today without running into the bathroom and...

What I Really Learned in Nursing School

What I Really Learned in Nursing School

by amb218 - As a senior about to graduate from my BSN program, I began reflecting on what I learned throughout my four years of nursing school. In my classes, I learned pathophysiology, pharmacology, anatomy,...

Honor in Indignity

Honor in Indignity

by molly.hershman - People become nurses to help others and make a difference. But so many of the day-to-day miracles of nursing get lost in the exhaustion, the tediousness, the frustration, and the burn out. Nurses...

Coping with a Difficult Death

Coping with a Difficult Death

by jeastridge - Coping with a Difficult Death My phone rang as I sat in my car charting, wrapping up the visits for the afternoon. I recognized the number from the hospice house and reached over to answer before...

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Most Liked Comments

  • 12

    Yes. That's a HIPAA violation. [emoji23]

  • 9

    No, you cannot refuse care because you can't stand the guy. There are going to be many patients you can't stand.
    There is no picking and choosing who you take care of.

  • 8

    QUOTE= Heathermaizey; What??? This makes no sense at all. HIPAA is pretty simple and clear cut. You can not talk about patients at all. There you go.


    If one could not talk about a "patient at all," then there would be NO medical books to learn from, NO case studies, No way to gather scientific-based evidence because discussing anything would be a HIPAA violation. It's about the identity of a person not a patients sickness. They just can not be tied together.

    Here is a example of how one can discuss a patient. No date and time, no names, don't identify the location. Don't talk as this was your patient. I've gone to many seminars. The opening sentence starts off by the Provider or Speaker stating: A patient presented, etc. and continues to expose every single detail without it being a HIPAA violation.

  • 8

    I guess I have a hard time understanding people who come into nursing not knowing they will deal with ALL kinds in their career. And that whole "sincerely held belief thing"???? They should stick it. Why be a nurse if you are going to have "sincerely held beliefs" that prevent you from sharing the load?

    NO ONE likes to deal with creepy, manipulative people. In the hospital, we shared the wealth and if they were there multiple days, multiple nurses cared for them. They are exhausting and distracting and everyone should share the load.

  • 8

    Occasionally a special nurse comes along who thinks they shouldn't have any difficult patients ...but it's not fair that the other staff get more than their fair share of difficult patients so that the special nurse has none.

  • 7

    Quote from nevergiveup2016
    I'd be ok with it. Say for instance children with autism they just make me feel uncomfortable. I don't know how to interact with them or make them laugh or happy as other nurses do. It is really disappointing (I'm a CNA) to see one person walk in and they just know how to make them smile. It makes me happy to see that but then when I walk in they give me the look of get out of my room... it makes me uncomfortable because I want to make them smile that way too... It's such a silly reason but it's not due to their disability in any way.
    Ah, okay. Well, here's what I'll tell you about autism, as my kid is autistic. I talk to student teachers twice a year, and I always tell them the same 2 things. #1, special needs kids are like dogs: they can smell fear and they know if you don't like them or are uncomfortable. When they pick up on that vibe, they return it by acting withdrawn/scared/quiet/shutting down etc.. #2, it absolutely does not make you a bad person if you don't want to work with special needs people. It's not for everybody and it's hard sometimes. However, you're going to encounter them, and in increasing numbers now especially with autism. So it's beneficial to you to try to figure out how to work with them as best you can, because you can't really avoid working with that particular population, at least not in pediatric nursing. Unless you go to NICU, then you should be fine.

    Autism is scary if you don't live with it or work with it every day, I know. I used to be absolutely terrified of it before I ever had children, so much so that I prayed that if I ever had a special needs child, that it be "anything but autism." God is not without a sense of irony. It's a hard one to learn and it can be really difficult to get comfortable with, but I would encourage you to try, maybe get some continuing education or something, simply because that population cannot be avoided. Shadow the nurses who are "good" with those kids and steal their techniques. I did the same thing when my kiddo was newly diagnosed. I had no clue what I was doing, so I just did what his therapists did. I felt like a fraud. LOL. Eventually, though, you get it, and you start to feel more comfortable, and it clicks.

    Anyway, best of luck to you in wherever your journey leads you.


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