Should I try and become a Nurse in a Naturopathic Clinic or a Naturopathic Doctor? - page 2

by NenaRK

21,467 Views | 41 Comments

I am a 21 year old female and have been taking my prerequisites for Nursing. I felt very passionate about my choice, I do really enjoy caring for people and helping people. However, as I got further into my studies, talked to... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from usalsfyre
    Rude and insensitive, but there is absoloutely ZERO good evidence that naturopathy works. If we were talking about someone peddling an allopathic treatment regimen with zero evidence as a "cure" we'd call them a quack. Yet for some reason when we talk about CAM we're supposed to be "sensitive" about stuff that doesn't work.
    The American Holistic Nurses Association, accredited by ANCC supports CAM. Enough said.
  2. 0
    Remember that if a small practice chooses to hire an RN, they are hiring you for your RN skills, not your interest in CAM. Though it might be a benefit to know that you are on the same page as them, philosophically, they aren't paying your RN wages for you to refuse meds.

    That being said, there are some ND practices (in some states) where they do things like vitamin C infusions so they would need someone who can legally start IV's. Generally, though, most primary care practices don't hire RN's at all--they have MA's or CNA's, or maybe LPN's since they are cheaper than RN's.

    Good luck!
  3. 0
    NP medicine is licensed in about 15 states. In the others states it's either unlicensed (meaning anyone can call herself a 'Naturopathic Physician'), or it's illegal- and the AMA is behind that driving force. As far as if NP works? Some of it is just nonsense (homeopathy, treating AIDS or cancer with H202 infusions, etc.). A lot of it is wonderful and proven- back adjustments, massage, accupuncture, bowel cleanses, and IVs that flush your system out. As far as nursing goes- I have a friend that is a NP, and he uses a medical assistant (you heard me RIGHT!) to start all of his IVs. I thought he was out of his mind, until I read the state laws that say, basically, under supervision? An MA can do almost 'anything' a physician wants, under direct supervision. So, no NP is going to pay an RN, when he can pay an MA $9 an hour to give a $5 IV that he bills the patient for, for about $150. Sorry for the reality check!
  4. 0
    I went to an NP a few years ago. Awesome experience. I felt she spent way more time with me than any regular "doctor"has before. In my opinion, go all the way. She had her own practice, for which I paid like $300 for one visit (worth it, to me), and did not have a nurse.
  5. 0
    Not to mention- since you paid cash, your encounter with her will 'never' enter the digital realm, so your secrets are safe with her!
  6. 0
    Quote from PNCC2001
    The American Holistic Nurses Association, accredited by ANCC supports CAM. Enough said.
    Obviously the AHNA would "support" CAM. What do you mean by "accredited by ANCC"? I'm unaware of the ANCC "accrediting" any voluntary specialty organizations.
  7. 4
    Quote from usalsfyre
    Rude and insensitive, but there is absoloutely ZERO good evidence that naturopathy works. If we were talking about someone peddling an allopathic treatment regimen with zero evidence as a "cure" we'd call them a quack. Yet for some reason when we talk about CAM we're supposed to be "sensitive" about stuff that doesn't work.
    If there is zero evidence it is probably due to the fact that there is very little research given pharmaceutical companies have their tentacles in everything...
    cecej435, Alphabet-soupRN, UlanaD, and 1 other like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from elkpark

    Obviously the AHNA would "support" CAM. What do you mean by "accredited by ANCC"? I'm unaware of the ANCC "accrediting" any voluntary specialty organizations.
    The ANCC accredits the organization (AHNCC) and/or the credential for holistic nurse.
  9. 3
    Quote from usalsfyre
    Want to hit me with the literature I've missed? Cause I'm pretty sure the CAM folks would be crowing about something showing even minimal benefit.
    Lol. This is an old post so i won't bother fully address the level of ignorance of this post.
    Alphabet-soupRN, UlanaD, and RiverLion like this.
  10. 1
    Um. There is plenty of evidence to back up many CAM modalities. Yes, some alternative remedies have been proven not to work. Others have been proven harmful. Some lack evidence to verify their efficacy, and others have fairly strong evidence supporting them. Lots of herbal remedies work very well, and things like acupuncture have some data behind them. Allopathic medicine has more than it's fair share of harmful and non-evidence based practices.

    Don't knock CAM as a whole. We should look at all forms of healing- allopathic or naturopathic- with a healthy dose of skepticism.

    ALSO- and this is important, IMO- the placebo effect is a real thing. The placebo effect can bring relief to people without the hefty dose of side effects inherent in many drugs. That's why I am a reluctant fan of homeopathy. Homeopathy is a load of crap. But it really *works* for some people, and as long as they don't eschew needed allopathic treatments, then homeopathy can be a helpful treatment.

    An another note, naturopathic training can also help clinicians work with traditional healers. This skill is very important if you want to work in indigent communities or do international work.
    jojo111 likes this.


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