States Who Have Banned HESI - page 3

by Decemberblues | 25,557 Views | 86 Comments

what do we know about the states that have banned HESI? I know New York is one...any others?... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from foreverLaur
    Why would states ban Hesi? Don't they write the NCLEX?
    Heck no.

    HESI is being used by schools to prevent students from graduating that can't pass it...therefore, they can't sit for the NCLEX if they don't have a degree in their hands.

    The schools say that the students need to "meet a standard".

    However, we all know it's to artificially skew the pass-rates and give the school the best possible shot at increasing their pass rate percentage with the BON's as they make this information public.

    It prevents the BON's from identifying and shutting down substandard nursing programs, and frankly, I believe that BON's should not permit the practice at accredited schools.

    There is nothing wrong with using HESI as an evaluation tool, but it should not be used to determine who graduates.
    dowde, SandraCVRN, and RNDreamer like this.
  2. 3
    Quote from CuriousMe
    It's used as our (and many other) school's exit exam. The HESI is supposed to be a good indicator for success on NCLEX. Personally, I like it....what's the use in graduating if I can't pass the NCLEX?
    The problem is, the people making the claim that HESI is a good predictor is the people that are SELLING the program to the schools.

    Odd how you can't find independent research to see if there is a correlation.

    To me, HESI simply hides a bigger problem: If you get a student that can complete a nursing program with a high GPA and can't pass the NCLEX, then there is a problem with the nursing program, NOT the student.
    dowde, morte, and SandraCVRN like this.
  3. 0
    I agree somewhat with the last post. I cannot comprehend how someone can get a high GPA in a nursing program and be unable to pass the HESI.

    We take it every term. I know classmates that don't score well on them...and they are usually struggling to pass the courses as well. For me, my GPA isn't the highest. I work FT in addition to NS. I am content with B's (given that you need an 86 to get a B and a 93 to get an A). When I take the HESI, my scores are always in the 900+ range!

    For me, taking the HESI every term and scoring that high gives me comfort. Since the vast majority of those who take the NCLEX pass on the first try and those who score 850+ on the HESI usually pass on the first try, I see this as a great way to measure my own progress. I won't be terrified on the day I take the NCLEX.
  4. 0
    Quote from BabyLady
    The problem is, the people making the claim that HESI is a good predictor is the people that are SELLING the program to the schools.

    Odd how you can't find independent research to see if there is a correlation.

    To me, HESI simply hides a bigger problem: If you get a student that can complete a nursing program with a high GPA and can't pass the NCLEX, then there is a problem with the nursing program, NOT the student.
    Is there independent research at all though? It just doesn't seem to be the kind of thing folks are clamoring to study...


    How common is it really for a student with a high GPA to not pass the NCLEX?

    It seems to me, that not many folks are concerned about how someone with a high GPA will do on the NCLEX....they're more looking at the majority of the bell and the folks to the left of the highest point of curve. So the mean down to the just passing. That's who had trouble passing the exit HESSI in my program...there were just 3 or 4 and they were all squeaking by in the program.
    Last edit by CuriousMe on Apr 9, '10
  5. 0
    I went to school in NY and took a HESI exit exam. I don't get what the big deal with HESI is.
  6. 0
    Do you have to pay to take the HESI exams, and if so, how much money is involved? If it's much at at all I'd feel irritated that I as a student have to pay for something that might be a nice review but is essentially being used by the school as a gatekeeper to ensure high NCLEX pass rates for them. And I'd REALLY be mad if it was used to prevent my graduating, even though I'd passed all my classes. I never took any sort of "outside" exams when I was in nursing school.
    A 10-day review course was offered to graduates if they wanted to pay for it, but it was in no way mandatory. A few people took it, most didn't, and the school had a 98-99% pass rate anyway. Of course, that was back in the day when NCLEX was a two day paper and pencil exam!
  7. 0
    Quote from RNandRRT
    Yes, but it sounds like a huge waste of time and energy. Wouldn't taking the NCLEX for the first time give you a good idea where you stood?

    Just seems pretty redundant for a mandatory item. If it was used just for practice for the NCLEX I would understand.
    IIRC (this was 5 years ago, so bear with me), our school used the HESI as an exit exam. If you could pass with a minimum score, you were exempted from the otherwise mandatory NCLEX prep course that the school offered. So this was the school's way of determining which students needed a little more help to pass the NCLEX. And of course, every school has a huge stake in their students passing.

    Also, our school used your HESI score, in part, to determine your grade in your 4th semester nursing class. So it wasn't a "pass the HESI or you can't graduate" type thing, but it definitely played a part.
  8. 0
    Quote from maxthecat
    Do you have to pay to take the HESI exams, and if so, how much money is involved?
    The school purchases access to the tests. It's part of our tuition. I like the way our school handles HESI exams. They are required at the end of each class, but they don't affect your grade. If you score below 850, you have to do 50 remediation NCLEX questions with a minimum score (but I don't know what that is). I think it's useful for students who are still working out how to answer those pesky questions.
  9. 0
    We had to pay. My exit HESI was something like $50, plus $20 to use the testing center. End-of-semester HESIs were around $25. My class complained a lot to the administration, though, and I think for the classes behind us they've changed the way HESI payment is handled - it is included in a packet purchased as part of the tuition, or something.
  10. 1
    Quote from BabyLady
    If you get a student that can complete a nursing program with a high GPA and can't pass the NCLEX, then there is a problem with the nursing program, NOT the student.
    I see it as a problem with the nursing program AND the student.
    janhetherington likes this.


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