MA saying she's "the same as an RN" - page 10

At my job, we are offered classes each month for our CEU's as LNA's. We were at one the other day for some psych training, and we were asked what we wanted to be doing in 5 years. Myself and... Read More

  1. by   TPS360
    MA -RN.....looks like she working as an RN in her dreams...
  2. by   CityKat
    Quote from dee78
    I don't really have a problem with MAs being referred to as nurses. It's just easier than trying to explain what a MA really is. It's like me calling my dad and his girlfriend "my parents". Did she give birth to me? No but she fits the role of a parent so it's easier to just group her in with him.

    Just my .
    Actually, it 's like comparing apples and oranges. One has a lengthy education and the opportunity to move forward in their profession and the other does not. I don't have an issue with the MA, but when they don't correct people, I do. It looks bad on the profession, as they don't have the same skills set. And what if they make a mistake?

    I thought there is a law that protects the definition and who can call themselves a nurse? Ie. baby nurse. If you don't hold the license, then don't pretend to hold one. It's quite simple, yet b/c there is "clout" and "pride" with our title, people ride it. When I graduated nursing school, people starting calling me a nurse. I continued to say "no, I'm a graduate nurse". Now, it is official. I am a registered nurse and rightly proud to call myself a nurse

    I too have seen PA's presenting themselves as the MD. I saw it with my own eyes in NYC while I was in school.
  3. by   justme1972
    To me, here is the big difference:

    Medical Assistants are not a recognized profession in most states. There is no state exam, there is no registration, there is no license to be got, etc. Unlike a CNA that does have a state exam and is registered as well as regulated.

    The "certification" is given by each individual school by whatever criteria that they set.

    There are for-profit schools that have been charging $50,000 for MA programs, only for these people to find out they are lucky if they can get a job and make more than 8 bucks an hour.
  4. by   CityKat
    They are doing the same thing with phlebotomy. I had a few friends recently pay and finish a phlebotomy program. I insisted they go to the hospitals, but they wouldn't listen to me. In the end, neither of them can get a position and a school mate got a job in the hospital, but it is only paying her $10 an hour. Really sad.
  5. by   momx4
    Quote from ADHolt
    I have a question. I just started a MA program at kaplan. I was told that being a MA is a step to becoming an RN. Just wondering if this was wrong information I was given. Looks to me that being an LPN is closer to the RN Program. Just wanted some advice before I spend the 14 thousand to become a MA...Thanks to whoever can help...

    MA isn't a step closer to RN. It will give you medical experience but as far as being closer to be an RN, no. You will have to do the same schooling as someone who has no experience at all. LPN is a step closer. You could get your RN in 2 years so you should just go ahead and go straight to it. Good luck! I hope that helps.
  6. by   TangoLima
    I found this discussion interesting since I just did a project for school with MA's. As part of our community coursework, 3 of us were assigned to a low-income community clinic. They are staffed with 13 providers, 13 MA's, and 2 RN's. One of the RNs supervises the MA's and one is a patient educator.

    Long story short, we identified the need to educate the MA's about the possible effect of medications they were injecting. We found that the MA's gave lots of injections, knew what the medications were for basically, but didn't think about the possible side effects. For example, promethazine can cause sedation, so be careful of falls, caution the patient to avoid driving until they know how they will react, etc. They also didn't know not to massage the injection site after giving Depo-provera. This will speed the absorption and decrease the longevity of the medication. Also did not know that patients on Depo should take calcium/vit D to prevent osteoporosis.

    As far as physically giving the injection, it was obvious that they did not routinely identify landmarks prior to giving the injection. They just kindof
    "eyeballed" it. Even after we did our teaching, it was obvious they were just going to go back to their old ways.

    The problem is that MA's are given more and more of the technical duties of nurses due to cost-cutting efforts. It is much cheaper to teach an MA to do injections and pay them $10/hr than to have an RN on hand.

    Another problem is that MA schools are not standardized/regulated like nursing schools are. They are also taught various skills at the discression of the employing institution. Therefore, you may have an MA who takes vital signs only, then have an MA at another facility who gives injections, draws blood, etc.

    According to the MA scope of practice, MA's must practice under the supervision of a provider. But the problem is that most providers are not aware of this requirement and do not provide adequate supervision.

    During our project, I felt that some of the MAs were resentful of our presence, us being lowly BSN student teaching them how to do their job. There also may have been some racial tension as they were all african american and we were all white (at least I had that feeling). One MA did complain that they did all this work, but did not get paid for what they did. I felt like saying, "then why don't you do all the pre-reqs and go to nursing school then? Maybe then you will see the difference in the two roles." But, I held my tongue.
  7. by   stressed317
    I am a CMA (certified medical assistant), who is currently in an AD nursing program. Unfortunately, like everything else in life, there are good and bad MA's. In my area, most of the doctor's offices hire MA's instead of real nurses to keep their costs down. I have found that I want more out of life than what my MA education has to offer. I am very happy that I am continuing my education. A final thought: as one of my instructors said while pointing out the difference between LPN and RN. "They do some of the same duties, but an RN can tell you why she is doing it."
  8. by   flightnurse2b
    [quote=PAdutch317;2741260]I am a CMA (certified medical assistant), who is currently in an AD nursing program. Unfortunately, like everything else in life, there are good and bad MA's. In my area, most of the doctor's offices hire MA's instead of real nurses to keep their costs down. I have found that I want more out of life than what my MA education has to offer. I am very happy that I am continuing my education. A final thought: as one of my instructors said while pointing out the difference between LPN and RN. "They do some of the same duties, but an RN can tell you why she is doing it."[/quote]


    i find that comment to not only be presumptuous and very untrue, but just down right rude. sorry. i think most LPNs can tell you why they are doing whatever duty they are performing just as well as an RN can.
  9. by   dalvnjjh
    I'm a LVN in California and going to be starting the advance placement R.N. program in August. First of all, I feel that if MA's feel like they don't get paid enough then they should go back to school. There is no excuse not to go back other than pure laziness. There are so many grants, loans, scholorships, etc. I'm a married father of 3 boys and I worked while going to school. It took a while but its POSSIBLE. Thanks to America, everyone has the free right to go to school.
  10. by   dalvnjjh
    tell her blah blah blah
  11. by   Nurseinprocess
    Quote from ADHolt
    I have a question. I just started a MA program at kaplan. I was told that being a MA is a step to becoming an RN. Just wondering if this was wrong information I was given. Looks to me that being an LPN is closer to the RN Program. Just wanted some advice before I spend the 14 thousand to become a MA...Thanks to whoever can help...

    Wow! $14,000 to become an MA? My ADN degree is going to cost me less than $8,000. I think you just makde a step into the medical field, but not necessarily a step towards nursing.
  12. by   DutchgirlRN
    this thread is from 2005 but the debate goes on. ma's will never be the same as a rn. some things don't and shouldn't ever change. if they want to be the same as an rn then they need to go back to school and then pass the nclex-rn.
  13. by   4rom2bRN
    Gosh, it this true? I have never heard of this before. I was shocked when I had to go to an Urgent care and the person who was taking my vital signs was an EMT/MA.
    I agree with my aunt who is an LPN. The color coded uniforms should come back. All white uniforms should be worn only for Registered Nurses. My aunt has MLPN embroidered on her uniforms.
    I know that nursing programs is much more difficult and challenging than MA programs.
    As long as she as not posing as an RN, than we can exhale.

    :wink2:

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