Is getting my RN at a technical college a bad idea? - page 2

I'm a recent VN graduate and have been diligently searching high and low for the smoothest and fastest transition into an ADN program. As you all may know, the community college system is lacking and... Read More

  1. by   nurseprnRN
    Tech schools in general may hold some kind(s) of accreditation, but it may not be acceptable to a real BSN program, or almost certainly not to any advanced program like CRNA.

    To be sure you won't be wasting time (and unnecessarily huge sums of money), go to a community college with an agreement to integrate with a BSN program. If for some reason you don't want to do this, at least check with your target BSN program(s) to be sure they'd accept the other credits in transfer. If they don't, you'd be doubly screwed, paying off huge loans for a wasted program AND having to pay more to have acceptable credits before applying to the BSN program. We see the sob stories here often of people who didn't do their informed due diligence on these issues. Don't be another one.
  2. by   HouTx
    Great Googly-Moogly.... $66k for an ADN? And people are jumping into this? Why in the world would anyone pay 10X the cost of a well-organized CC program that does include courses that will transfer to a BSN? I really am getting old.
  3. by   TiffyRN
    Quote from HouTx
    Great Googly-Moogly.... $66k for an ADN? And people are jumping into this? Why in the world would anyone pay 10X the cost of a well-organized CC program that does include courses that will transfer to a BSN? I really am getting old.
    Cause they can have it now!!! No wait. I can see the desperation though as I've heard many CA colleges do admissions on a lottery, so not even stellar grades are going to up your chances of getting in.
  4. by   NurseGirl525
    What is wrong with the community college system? I think it's great. You are going to waste your money at a technical college. I know a PP said her credits transferred but those are very, very few. Technical colleges are insanely expensive and most hospitals at least in my area look down on you and won't hire you if you go to one of those schools. So you have a degree that is worthless and owe the government huge sums of money. I don't know what your beef is with CCs but I have has a great experience with mine.
  5. by   Purple_roses
    Good to know my college is "lacking," as we all apparently know.

    Technical colleges are usually more expensive and sometimes their credits do not transfer. You would need to look into what organization is accrediting them. It would also be worth giving a call to the college you want to get your BSN at to see if they accept credits from the schools you are considering.

    On a side note, my community college has had a 100% NCLEX pass rate the past two years, and the college I hope to obtain my BSN from accepts every single credit. It took me a year to complete my pre reqs. All in all, not that much time spent to save some money on my ASN RN. It might also be beneficial to consider the community colleges near you.
  6. by   augurey
    I think it all depends on the accreditation. If it's not regionally or nationally accredited, it may be very difficult to continue your education.

    I started at a technical school in the fall in an ADN program. The school itself is ACICS accredited with BON approval. Yes, I could of sat the NCLEX, but my continuing education prospects were almost non-existent. The tuition for the 2 year program (also has pre-req courses along side the nursing courses) is 40k.

    When I enrolled I didn't understand the different accreditations and what it meant. During my first semester I heard how former graduates had difficulty finding employment (the program being about 4-5 years old). I knew where I wanted to go after I graduated, but they also required a BSN within 5 years of employment. I wasn't even sure they'd hire me from an ACICS accredited school. I started researching my prospects for continuing education and pretty much every single one wanted a degree from a regionally or nationally accredited school.

    I did find one school that would allow me into their RN to BSN program, but I would have to petition and be admitted as a general student, and take 4 additional classes before they'd accept me into their RN to BSN program, and that's only if there was room. If there wasn't room, I would be out of luck for that year and would have to try the following year.

    I opted to withdraw from the technical school and apply to the other school's program that is regionally accredited and cheaper. Fortunately they only require 3 pre-reqs and provided me with options to complete those.

    So I would really think about where you want to go and what you want after you graduate if they do not become regionally or nationally accredited because it could really limit you. Being limited what was what truly made me decide to take the risk to withdraw and apply elsewhere (where they are affiliated with a hospital and most graduates find employment there). It's too much time away from my family and too much money to be limited after I graduate.

    I would look at your RN to BSN options in the event they aren't regionally or nationally accredited to see what you need to do to get accepted into those programs. I would hate to see you go through that much money and schooling to only find yourself having to repeat courses or not be able to move forward in your education.
  7. by   Purple_roses
    Quote from DanielStern
    I'm absolutely not ok with wasting my time, thats why I've opened this forum to have a dialogue with seasoned nurses whom have been there, and hopefully gain a few pearls. Now, please feel free to exit the forum and don't forget take your black cloud with you.
    I realize you may be hearing things you don't want to hear, but if you're in the business of not wasting time, listen up. Not everyone responding is an experienced RN, but everyone responding is knowledgable about what a good nursing program looks like. I spent a year researching nursing programs before even applying to take pre reqs. I toured one particular technical school that would have cost me 60k for my RN. Their credits did not transfer to ANY college, meaning I would have had to take all those courses over again for my BSN. Now, as a pp stated, you can have a successful experience at a technical college. The key here is to research it very well so that you don't waste time on a school that won't help you reach your goals.

    Most of us here really do wish you well. But we also don't appreciate cocky attitudes.
  8. by   littlepeopleRNICU
    Quote from Purple_roses
    Good to know my college is "lacking," as we all apparently know.

    Technical colleges are usually more expensive and sometimes their credits do not transfer. You would need to look into what organization is accrediting them. It would also be worth giving a call to the college you want to get your BSN at to see if they accept credits from the schools you are considering.

    On a side note, my community college has had a 100% NCLEX pass rate the past two years, and the college I hope to obtain my BSN from accepts every single credit. It took me a year to complete my pre reqs. All in all, not that much time spent to save some money on my ASN RN. It might also be beneficial to consider the community colleges near you.
    I took the poster using technical school and community college as one in the same, because my school IS a community college, not a technical university. My original nursing program was very inexpensive. For those that are more, I do agree with you.
  9. by   nekozuki
    Have you thought about getting your LPN at a technical college? I did that because it took only a year, and I wouldn't have to worry about credits transferring since most LPN to RN accelerated programs at community colleges are "come right in, step right up" and require only an active license to apply. I was able to start working as a nurse immediately after my LPN, which meant the process of continuing education was less urgent because I could support myself.
  10. by   GPatty
    I had 1 semester left to obtain my BSN when I failed. I failed because my Mom had been diagnosed with cancer, and I was taking a three hour (one way) trip to be with her each Wednesday night and coming home late Friday night or early Saturday morning, working 12 hour shifts on the weekends, and doing it all again.
    I failed by 2 points and was told by the Dean, that I could come back and reapply in three years if I wanted to.
    No, I did not want that. At all. I went to the local technical college and obtained my ASN in 9 months, went on to Indiana Wesleyan (on line) for my BSN and am now in classes for my NP with them.
    It was a hard route, but one that suited me, and frankly, I wouldn't trade a thing. The technical school was (is) an excellent school that gave more personal attention to their students. I know I wouldn't have failed had I been there, they would have worked with me instead of booting me out and very coldly telling me that i "could reapply in three years".
    I loved my technical school. They cried with me, literally, when I dedicated a graduation project to my parents (who passed within 9 months of each other of cancer).
  11. by   ready2baRN
    I'm currently pursuing my ADN at a technical college. I called numerous public schools and my previous undergrad (private non profit). I was given the green light to pursue my BSN at most of the schools except for two but ONLY because I have a previous bachelors degree from a regionally accredited university and I did all my pre reqs at a regionally accredited college as well, however I was told I would have to take a few challenge exams through excelsior college while in the program.

    Also most online schools such as Kaplan, WGU, University of Phoenix will accept you (and they are CCNE accredited) but it would be more expensive then public school. My suggestion to you would be to call around to different public schools in your area to see what there admission requirements are.

    Good Luck.
  12. by   TiffyRN
    Quote from ready2baRN
    Also most online schools such as Kaplan, WGU, University of Phoenix will accept you (and they are CCNE accredited) but it would be more expensive then public school.
    Once more, since your plans have CRNA school up there, you will need to make sure the BSN program you choose has a good success rate where you apply. WGU poses issues for some graduate programs as it only issues pass/fail grades. Just things to consider. They are however, at least potentially, one of the cheapest options out there.
  13. by   seanynjboy
    It is not so much that it is a tech school. That is not the big deal. What you care about is their specific accreditation. Better to look for a tech school that is REGIONALLY ACCREDITED. Regionally accredited schools are able to transfer more credits. I went to a Nationally Accredited school (and I was aware of the lack of higher ed schools that accepted transfers. I was ok with that. I'm more limited as to who I can transfer credits to. I did start my BSN last year but had to stop due to work.

    Just find out if they are NATIONALLY or REGIONALLY accredited. (You want to try to find one that is NLN (or whatever the new one is called ) or CCNE - (CCNE is typically 4 year schools).

    I worked for a tech school as well as went to one.

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