A Student Learned the HARD way... (a little long) - page 2

..about how serious pt. confidentiality and access to their chart info is. (this was unbelievable) On a med-surg floor a group of students were assigned. A patient on that floor just happened to... Read More

  1. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from Carolanne
    ... "April" obviously has some serious anger issues...
    I'd add personality, responsibility, ego and maturity issues to the list.
  2. by   Headhurt
    I think that is taking the whole "patient advocate" thing a little overboard!!

    It was explained to me that nursing students work off the license of the nursing instructor, as well as the nurse who is assigned to this patient...but more responsibility falls upon the instructor. I've had instructors who had the confidence to let me do my own thing after making sure I understood what I was doing, and then I have had instructors who were there constantly...even to give Milk of Mag. One could not even fart without her right behind you to smell it, and then tell you about the perils of methane gas.

    This instructor had every right to toss this girl out. Especially since the student took the incident as extreme as she did. The instructor has to not only protect her license, but the contractual integrity of the school. Chances are pretty good that if nothing had been done to the student, the hospital would've terminated the school's contract at the end of the semester. If that didn't happen, students to come would have to deal with the stigma that the nutball student left in her wake. Had this been in my clinical group, I would've thought less of my school and instructor had nothing been done.

    I really hope this incident doesn't affect the rest of your clinical experience in a negative way. I hope the nurses understand that this was the actions of one student, and not the sentiment of the entire clinical group. If the hospital is bringing charges against her, then she can pretty much kiss whatever chance she has of a nursing degree goodbye. Keep us updated!

    Its a damn shame, too...and so close to graduation, but she did it to herself. Lets hope she decides that she is not cut out to be a nurse and look into other occupations. Walmart is always hiring!
    Last edit by Headhurt on Mar 13, '04
  3. by   fergus51
    We may not all behave completely rationally, but we don't start screaming profanities, looking through charts we have no right to or calling docs at home and screaming at them. Sure, there may be other things going on and she's stressed, but in the end, so what? You think you aren't going to get stressed as a nurse? And you can't behave that way or you'd lose your job, just like this student lost her place in school. Believe me, there have been MANY times when I have felt like screaming profanities at work, but I didn't.
  4. by   LadyT618
    I agree this girl is really off her rocker....She is either nuts or really really immature. Why couldn't she just calmly explain that it was her brother in there. I'm actually here thinking that maybe it wasn't really her brother and she's just wacko. You mean when the nurse told him, he didn't say anything? I find that really strange, considering security just hauled your sister outta there. Strange strange character.
  5. by   RNKITTY04
    This story makes me shiver all the way to my shoes. Talk about doing all the wrong things! Geesh maybe we should re-title this post "How to get kicked out of nursing school, no questions asked!!!!"
  6. by   kbella1218
    I cannot believe this girl! I can understand she is concerned about her brother, but even he stated he was ok and pain level was a 2! The instructor did the right thing. Imagine this gal trying to calm down an upset family or pt! Ha ha. Sometimes people just break, but she knew the rules.

    I REALLY feel for the nurse who had to hear her yelling. She seems like a very calm, cool, collected person and did the exact right thing. I woulda loved to see security drag that gal outta there.....tee hee.
  7. by   RedSox33RN
    WOW!! Just.........wow!!!

    I agree that the instructor did the right thing. There are so many things wrong with the WHOLE story......from the brother's pain not being bad at all, to her unruly attitude, screaming at the nurses, calling them incompetent, etc. It does sound very much like a stress/psych issue.

    Sure it is hard to deal with a loved one being hurt and in pain, but any nurse OR nursing student knows that you have to keep your head about you.

    Five years ago my daughter, who was 8 at the time, fell out of a moving jeep (seatbelt failed, and it was one with no doors.) By the grace of God it happened right down the road from our local hospital. I wasn't with them, but got there quickly. Yes, it was hard seeing my daughter like that - my husband couldn't even be in the room - but I stayed while they treated her 2nd & 3rd degree road burns, sutured her facial lac's, all the while giving her massive doses of morphine and Versed.

    Then the kicker - the ER doc was going to discharge her, with no head CT, xrays - nothing. No wound care instructions for me (I'm not a nurse yet, and was barely starting back to do pre-req's at the time), nothing. So I calmly asked one of the attending nurses to call the pediatrician on call. It was my right to have my daughter's ped or the on-call doc covering their practice called in. The covering doc came, and immediately said she wasn't going anywhere. Long story short, she was in for 4 days, and I was taught wound/burn care for home 2 days before her discharge, so the doc and nurses could witness me doing it and correct anything that needed correcting.

    Point is, after all that, is that being a b***h and PITA gets you nowhere. "April" unfortunately learned the hard way, but I'll bet it is one lesson she won't soon forget.
  8. by   jnette
    WHOA !!!

    No way. This little lassy would have been out of there at her very first rant... before she ever GOT to the chart/MAR part. The manner in which she addressed the nurse from the get-go would have been all it took for me. She wouldn't have been there long enough to continue with her second rant, much less go into his chart, or call the doc !

    Unbelievable. Stress or no stress, that kind of behavior is unaccptable/inexcusable under ANY circumstance.

    While I'm a softie about a LOT of things, this is one area where I have zero tolerance.

    As the others have stated, this child has some serious issues which need to be addressed before she's ready for ANY career... anywhere.
  9. by   christinemj
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    ..
    Well after clinical was over and all of the students signed off, the sister of the patient (we'll call her "April") went in to visit her brother.
    Interesting....

    Yes, this person used poor judgemnet... but WHY was the clinical instructor called in the first place. If the student was "off-duty," it was none of the INSTUCTOR'S business either.

    This was an issue for security..... not the instructor.
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from Gator,SN
    Her behavior was terrible and unprofessional, but maybe your instructor should have been on the floor with all of you during your clinical time so that when she first became upset she could have counseled her about what was happeneing so that it did not go this far.

    Clinicals had been over, the students were all signed out for the day, so that's why the instructor was off the floor.
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from christinemj
    Interesting....

    Yes, this person used poor judgemnet... but WHY was the clinical instructor called in the first place. If the student was "off-duty," it was none of the INSTUCTOR'S business either.

    This was an issue for security..... not the instructor.

    The clinical instructor was called since she was still in the building. If anything incident happens with a student (except their own trip to the ER, admission to the place, etc.), even if she's signed in or out, that kind of behavior become sthe instructors business because that student is representing the program (even more so by still having her clinical uniform on).
  12. by   fergus51
    Quote from christinemj
    Interesting....

    Yes, this person used poor judgemnet... but WHY was the clinical instructor called in the first place. If the student was "off-duty," it was none of the INSTUCTOR'S business either.

    This was an issue for security..... not the instructor.
    Violating patient confidentiality is an issue for a nursing instructor to know whether they are on or off duty. I mean, do you think this woman would have gone to the MAR or called the doc if she hadn't been a student there?
  13. by   jnette
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    The clinical instructor was called since she was still in the building. If anything incident happens with a student (except their own trip to the ER, admission to the place, etc.), even if she's signed in or out, that kind of behavior become sthe instructors business because that student is representing the program (even more so by still having her clinical uniform on).
    Absolutely. ..." that student is representing the program "... gotta agree with that.

close