**RING** Cellphones in class... - page 5

UHHHHHH! I have to vent! My ONE pet peeve during class is not the student who asks a zillion questions, the student who always knows someone with the condition that is being discussed, or the... Read More

  1. by   gauge14iv
    I love professors who deduct big points for cell phones ringing or buzzing in class
  2. by   jov
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    if i HAD children, well whopeedee, i'd think completely different, right??
    Right. You would. Saying you KNOW what you would think if you were a parent when you are not is like saying you KNOW what you would think if you're an African-American and you're not, or a man and you're not, or an unemployed homeless drug addict, if you're not.

    I think we are running two different threads here. I agree cell phones should not ring in the classroom. I also note that the instructor who posted here spelled it out as "your child needing medical attention" constituted an emergency. If the only time the cell phones rang in the classroom were when children needed medical attention, do you think we would have a post on it?
    Last edit by jov on Oct 7, '06
  3. by   jov
    Quote from semisweetchick
    your child's broken arm was not an emergency, and s/he could even have waited for a few hours in the school nurse's office until you could be reached.
    The school would not allow your child to wait in the nurse's office for a few hours until you could be reached. They would call an ambulance if you couldn't be reached.
    And if the school DID call you and you told them it's not an emergency and s/he can wait in the nurse's office for a few hours...
    then they would call DCFS.
  4. by   OnTheRoad
    I suppose I should preface this with the fact that I do not appreciate cell phone users who think they have a right to simply gab because they are "special" but....


    All this talk about whether someones child having a medical emergency is truly a cell phone emergency has kinda got me in a tissy ( OMG I am honest!). Is a broken arm an emergency? Is an asthma attack an emergency? Is a HoHo an emergency? Is an MVA an emergency?
    Ask this question..... If you were working in an ER and a broken arm of a child came in... would that be an emergency? How about an asthma attack? a Hoho? an MVA?
    So as a mother that is studying to be a nurse which of these "emergencies" is she "Allowed" to be concerned about?...... As a nurse she should be concerned about and attend to certain emergencies but as a mother she should say " Oh who cares? My schooling is more important than "THAT" emergency in my own family." What precedent does that set? How can one care for the community if they do not first take care of their own family?
  5. by   Natkat
    I have kids and I still think people should keep their cell phones off during class.

    For people who don't have kids, they should not be subjected to the inconvenience and disturbance of those who do. People make choices to have kids or not. People who choose not to have children should not have their learning experience disrupted by people who chose to have them. I get irritated when parents think their needs and choices are more important than the needs and choices of others. Who made up this rule?

    When my kids were small and I needed alone time I had a rule. If I was in a room alone or with someone who wanted some quality time with me, the rule was do not knock on this door unless someone is bleeding or the house is on fire. It teaches kids early on to prioritize their needs and desires and figure out how to deal with situations on their own. It helped them to learn independence early on and not to rely on me for everything that happens in their lives.

    The rule could be applied to phone calls too. A child with a fever, vomiting, fight with a sibling can wait until you are between classes or even until you get home. It is my opinion that kids need to learn early on that the world does not revolve around them, and they don't need someone running to their rescue for everything that happens in their lives. Kids who grow up with parents who jump every time they need something, grow up to be adults who expect people around them to jump whenever they want them to.
  6. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from DawnFL
    You obviously don't have kids.
    That'a pretty a baseless assumption. Specially when many of us that have rebutted your argument have written into the post that we HAVE raised children.

    What is the old phrase about assuming and what it makes out of you?
  7. by   AggieNurse99
    Ok. I have a phone with an outside button that you hold down to set to 'ring' 'vibrate' or 'silent'. I personally feel that disrupting class for most any reason is rude and wastes time/money. I try to keep my phone to silent, so one day when it was in my pocket, and the button must have been pushed in the car or whatever, when it went off vibrating, I was so startled I jumped up like I had been bit by a snake or something. It was really funny. My prof even laughed. Now it stays in my purse on 'silent' but my downloaded ringer is the theme from braveheart, so most people don't even hear it when it is set to 'ring' and not on the loudest setting. And you can buy phones that have an outside display that show if the call is worth answering.
  8. by   BSNtobe2009
    Quote from jov
    The school would not allow your child to wait in the nurse's office for a few hours until you could be reached. They would call an ambulance if you couldn't be reached.
    And if the school DID call you and you told them it's not an emergency and s/he can wait in the nurse's office for a few hours...
    then they would call DCFS.
    So are you saying if a kid had a low-grade fever of 99 or so, they would call an ambulance and run up $250 in bills (that the insurance won't pay for) if you couldn't be reached and then call Social Services when you told them that little Susie or Johnny would be just fine?

    If either one of those situations happened even once, little Susie or Johnny would be in a new school by Monday.

    That gives an entire new meaning to over-reacting..the daycare where my child is didn't even have such a policy for newborns...and it is a TOP center.
  9. by   gauge14iv
    The topic is not what constitutes an emergency - the topic is disturbing others with a cell phone.

    No excuses for a cell phone going off. You can set it in front of you where you can see it light up on silent if you must, and you can step out to take or return a call, but it should not make noise.

    ok...Im getting off this merry go round
  10. by   Roy Fokker
    Quote from gauge14iv
    The topic is not what constitutes an emergency - the topic is disturbing others with a cell phone.
    This moderator agrees.

    A reminder to stick to the topic please.

    Thanks,
    Roy
    allnurses.com moderator
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from jov
    Right. You would. Saying you KNOW what you would think if you were a parent when you are not is like saying you KNOW what you would think if you're an African-American and you're not, or a man and you're not, or an unemployed homeless drug addict, if you're not.
    LOL so i can't know what i would think in the future if i were a parent, but you would know what i would think when i'm a parent?

    That says it all

    BTW the comparison made in reference of being an African American or a man is apples to green peppers. It's not like i will become a man or African American in the future, but there is a chance that i will be a parent.
    Last edit by Marie_LPN, RN on Oct 8, '06
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    The topic is not what constitutes an emergency - the topic is disturbing others with a cell phone.
    And a lot of what i hear (at school) when people gripe (rightfully so) about this is that the instructor should put a stop to it. Perhaps, but, it's pretty ridiculous that an adult has to tell another adult to have some common courtesy. People should have enough sense on their own to turn the thing off w/o being told to.
    Last edit by Marie_LPN, RN on Oct 8, '06
  13. by   Plagueis
    Quote from DawnFL
    You obviously don't have kids.
    Well, I have one, and I am one who is annoyed by the constant cell phone abuse I seee in class, at work, libraries, movie theaters, etc. My parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents survived without cell phones, and no life-threatening emergencies were missed because of this. Many kids will consider "minor" things, such as arguing with siblings or asking if they can watch the Real World, emergencies, and call their parents about this. I've been in too many classes where students interrupted lectures with these "emergencies." The thing I worry about is the fact that this habit can affect cell phone users' future jobs. If they are in the middle of specific procedures, such as personal care or an operation, and their phone rings, will they stop doing their job to answer it? I already see people, many of whom are not parents, do this at previous jobs, and start talking on their phone, forgetting about their duties. My workplace bans cell phone use, except on breaks, and we can be disciplined if we don't follow this rule.

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