Yikes I'm Getting Old! - page 5

by traumaRUs, ADN, BSN, RN Admin | 15,852 Views | 73 Comments

We all must face it - we are aging. Oh yeah, when I was 20, 30, even 40, heck I was NOT going to get old. I was going to keep learning, stay current with evidence based practices and be on TOP! However, there was something... Read More


  1. 2
    Both.

    You CAN determine how you physically age by your mental attitude.

    I'm dealing with a family member who has diabetes and isn't taking care of that condition due to a bad attitude . . . . hence, aging in many ways not conducive to a long life.

    My in-laws are 88 and 84. Fil has some dementia but he has a positive attitude and is still very active. Mil has had chronic cervical and lumbar pain since I've known her and she has not let it stop her. They are both retired farmers/ranchers - their cardiac doc says his experience shows most folks who ran a farm ended up being pretty healthy heart-wise.

    I also have another family member who had chronic back pain who quit working in his 30's and is a lazy bum with a bad attitude.
  2. 0
    Quote from workingharder
    I also lift weights an a regular basis. But, this bad knee just ain't getting any better on it's own. I'm afraid I'm going to have to trade it in on a newer model one of these days.
    Yes, the knee and the lower back are the two main area problem with most everyone and usually they become more of a problem when you exercise them a lot (i.e. weight lifting) but this may not be because you have a bad knee or back. Before you engage in weight lifting you must weatherize or strengthen these areas for a while. I had exactly that: bad knee and bad back. Squats will actually turn your bad knees into insanely strong knees you just have to go extra slow in the beginning and also practice lots of leg pushes with the machine, when you sit and there is a weigh in front of your chin and you push the weight up but don't do the reverse movement for it's not good for your knees.
  3. 1
    I have known several patients who seem "Physically" aged, but "mentally" young. I have never recognized it before, but they seem to have the most positive outcomes for each diagnosis- as they have an epiphany that they need to take control- where ones that view themselves as "old" accept the diagnosis as "end times," instead of a new "challenge."

    Great question TraumaRUs!!!

    By the way, am I too young to think the fact that it's 2013 just unbelievable?
    Last edit by BostonTerrierLoverRN on Jan 2, '13
    uRNmyway likes this.
  4. 2
    I'm 55 & working full-time in a long-term care facility. I've only called in once in the 1 1/2 yrs. I've been there. I will work full-time as long as I can, then probably go part-time. I'm just glad that I don't have kids to take care of when I get home. I sure wouldn't have the energy to.
  5. 1
    Aging is a mindset. There's lots of us energetic "old" people out there in nursing, doing it just because it's fun and keeps our brains alive.
    Last edit by judybsn on Jan 2, '13 : Reason: spelling
    BostonTerrierLoverRN likes this.
  6. 1
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Was thinking about this again this morning: what do you all think? Is aging a physical or mental issue?

    This is such a great question,
    and i think it is both,
    depending on whether you are referring to
    how we are perceived,
    vs
    how we ourselves feel. Sometimes, those two things don't always match, ha ha!


    Agism does exist, and some of us, no matter how well we are doing in our second half of life, will face stereotypes and even outright discrimination now and then,
    but, on the other hand,
    now and then, we can enjoy a few perks now and then, too, from being perceived as older. I think it is very important, maybe now more than ever,
    that we value our own selves, no matter what the rest of the world might be signalling to us, and maintain the best attitudes we can.

    I really believe, with all my heart, that attitude is 90% of Evvvverything. An older person can have great health and enough energy, but, with a lousy attitude, it's all for naught, imo.
    or
    An older person can be struggling inside a body that isn't co-operating with their own life plan,
    but, has a wonderful "can do" or grateful, joyful attitude, and still be loving life and enjoying being vital.

    Still, sometimes i think of some quote, i once heard, "Old age is no place for sissies!" bah haha.


    PS---Such a great thread, just loved reading every reply on here. Thanks for posting this one, what a bunch of gems, just one after the other.
    cienurse likes this.
  7. 1
    I, too, am mid-50's and have been thinking about how much longer I'd like to be working full time. To be sure, my head and heart are still in it-it's my body that objects to be woken up at 5:30 a.m. and gotten out of bed every day!! Not to mention the right hip when, if weight is put on it a certain way, cracks and returns with a shooting pain until I have walked off the stiffness of the nighttime spent in restful repose, only to do it all over again the next day! With any luck, and with 62 coming in a mere 6 short years, my sights are set on early retirement and social security. I don't care if I'll lose a few bucks by not waiting til I'm 67-I want to be young enough to enjoy while I can the things that make life worthwhile!
    traumaRUs likes this.
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    So now I think I am the oldest nurse on the med/surg shift. How did this happen? I can keep up with all staff, probably due to my weight being in normal range. The only change is that I have let my hair go gray. I just got tired of dying it, the time, the expense, and the mess. And I love it. I get so many compliments from patients and visitors walking down the hall. I know I will not work till 65. This job is hard on the body and I want to have some body left to do what I love which is traveling backpacker style. So when the time comes, I will chuck it all in and be without health insurance along with husband (COBRA is out of reach) and hope for the best. We will pay off the house this year and have cash reserves from being frugal and that will be used for travel. I would rather have no insurance and enjoy the world than pay huge amounts and have to sit home. I will start collecting social security early, pension early, and hope for the best. I guess you could say that I am optimistic. Of course sky diving, bungee jumping will not be on the list!
    uRNmyway and traumaRUs like this.
  9. 1
    Quote from needshaldol
    So now I think I am the oldest nurse on the med/surg shift. How did this happen? I can keep up with all staff, probably due to my weight being in normal range. The only change is that I have let my hair go gray. I just got tired of dying it, the time, the expense, and the mess. And I love it. I get so many compliments from patients and visitors walking down the hall. I know I will not work till 65. This job is hard on the body and I want to have some body left to do what I love which is traveling backpacker style. So when the time comes, I will chuck it all in and be without health insurance along with husband (COBRA is out of reach) and hope for the best. We will pay off the house this year and have cash reserves from being frugal and that will be used for travel. I would rather have no insurance and enjoy the world than pay huge amounts and have to sit home. I will start collecting social security early, pension early, and hope for the best. I guess you could say that I am optimistic. Of course sky diving, bungee jumping will not be on the list!
    Maybe one of those catastrophic coverage plans would be the thing to get until you can apply for medicare.

    "Do I Need a Catastrophic Health Insurance Policy?

    Most people who purchase catastrophic health insurance are either in their twenties or between the ages of 50 and 65.6
    If you are a self-employed young adult, or employed without sufficient benefits, you may want to consider catastrophic health coverage in order to protect yourself against the financial difficulties that can ensue following a major health crisis.
    If you are between the ages of 50 and 65, purchasing catastrophic health insurance can be a smart form of financial protection should you develop an illness such as cancer or heart disease. However, if you are beginning to develop health problems and need to see a physician on a regular basis, then catastrophic health coverage may not be for you."

    Individual Health Plans - Looking for individual health insurance? You're not alone.
    traumaRUs likes this.
  10. 3
    Thx Mulan
    I have thought of checking into catastropic insurance and it is a royal pain to get information but I will check. I figure we can get travel insurance (another pain to check out for "real" info), and I have the top car ins. in case of accident and I have home owners that has accident. So I figure if I slip and fall at a dept. store, I am covered by them? We are in excellent health, parents lived into 90's. My dad did not have surgery till he was 90 other than a tooth extraction. I plan on getting all stuff done (colonoscopy, mammo, etc.) and then adios. Of course if there is some problem, we will change plans but so far we are good. And don't tell anyone, but I seldom eat veggies or fruit and take no vitamins and drink tap water.
    sharpeimom, traumaRUs, and Mulan like this.


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