Woud this sound "demanding?"

  1. I have a quick question... actually I wanted to get some opinions. Here is some background info: I'm a pre-nursing student and after three colonoscopies in the last two months, they have discovered that I have a mass on the outside of my colon that is partially obstructing my colon. I have a CT scheduled on Wednesday. Now, we have found from the three recent procedures that my veins are terrible! I got stuck no less than 4 times each time they tried to insert IVs, and for two of the procedures they had to call an IV nurse to come do it. I did okay the first two procedures, but ended up in tears when we had the same problem when I went in for the third procedure. I was nervous about what is going on with me and tired of the pain of repeated IV attempts.

    My husband told me that when I go for the CT on Wednesday that I should just tell them right away to call an IV nurse and not let them stick me over and over. But I'm afraid that I would sound like a very demanding, whiny patient and that they probably wouldn't call an IV nurse without doing their own attempts first. I don't want to be "demanding," but my gosh, it hurts when they can't get those IVs in me! So what do you think? Should I tell them to call the IV nurse and not let them attempt? Ugh. I hate this! Of course, I'm also now terrified I have cancer. This waiting is just really hard.

    Thanks for any advice!
    Last edit by Krissiana on Dec 22, '07
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  2. 24 Comments

  3. by   happydays352
    I think it is reasonable to explain what happened in the past. I wouldn't feel bad about trying to avoid some pain especially concerning needles *yuck*.
  4. by   JBudd
    "demanding" is being obnoxious, screaming and refusing to listen to anything at all.

    With your history, go in early enough to state that because of your previous problems you would prefer an IV nurse to begin with, and that you've come in early enough to allow for them to call for one. Be polite, reasonable, and firm. Alternatively, call the day before and explain the problem, and ask that an IV nurse be notified ahead of time. Again, polite, reasonable and firm. It will save them time in the long run as well. You don't have to allow anyone you don't want touching you to do so.

    (Remember, CT dyes usually need a large bore IV near the antecubital area)

    God Bless, hope all turns out well for you :angel2::angel2::icon_hug:
  5. by   Virgo_RN
    It's your body. You don't have to consent to anything you don't want to.
  6. by   Roseyposey
    I would let your nurses know about your previous experiences. However, don't discount the skills of the nurses who work procedures or same-day surgery areas - I know in my hospital they are often more skilled at iv starts than the coveted "IV Team." Just be sure they know what you have gone through; I know that speaking for myself, I don't like to use people as pin cushions and will call the best nurse at iv starts that I can if I have any doubt that I can get the start on the first try.
  7. by   meandragonbrett
    I'd have them call the IV Team, and ED Nurse, or an ICU nurse (if one was able to come).
  8. by   TazziRN
    You can insist on it without being seen as demanding. You know your history better than anyone, and you have the right to insist on your care being as painless as possible.

    If there is no IV/ER/ICU nurse available, you can insist that the line be started with a local anesthetic. You are a prime candidate for that.
  9. by   FireStarterRN
    I always appreciate patients who let me know they are a 'hard start'. I think making a request like this is reasonable and within your rights.
  10. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from meandragonbrett
    I'd have them call the IV Team, and ED Nurse, or an ICU nurse (if one was able to come).
    ICU nurses aren't necessarily the best at IVs. In some ICUs they rarely start IVs, having central lines. I've met ICU nurses who don't even know now because they have IV therapy at their hospitals.

    At our hospital Surgical Outpatient (SOP) nurses are often the hotshots because they start IVs all day long. They are the ones who we call for hard starts.
  11. by   BookwormRN
    I agree with the above...When I have a pt tell me that they are a hard start, I immediately go to find recruits who have more experience than I! It saves both the pt and the nurse from pain and frustration.

    My thoughts and prayers are with you.
  12. by   Tweety
    Quote from jlsRN
    I always appreciate patients who let me know they are a 'hard start'. I think making a request like this is reasonable and within your rights.
    Me too, I appreciate the heads up when a patient states they are a hard stick and I usually take a quick look and then go find someone real gifted with IVs.

    Good luck!
  13. by   Daytonite
    I was an IV therapist for 6 years. Absolutely, you should tell them that the nurses have trouble finding veins for IVs and they always end up calling the IV team. Tell them right out if they start to give you any flak that you are giving them one chance to get it. That should get them on the right track.

    By the way, I had a mass found on a colonoscopy back in June, had it removed and am now undergoing chemotherapy. The oncologist didn't even bother with IVs. "PICC line" was the order he wrote. The PICC line was inserted by a wonderful radiologist and nurse at the local hospital and has been in place since July and is doing marvelous. I never have to worry about getting stuck for chemo or blood work.
  14. by   Blee O'Myacin
    Quote from Krissiana
    I have a quick question... actually I wanted to get some opinions. Here is some background info: I'm a pre-nursing student and after three colonoscopies in the last two months, they have discovered that I have a mass on the outside of my colon that is partially obstructing my colon. I have a CT scheduled on Wednesday. Now, we have found from the three recent procedures that my veins are terrible! I got stuck no less than 4 times each time they tried to insert IVs, and for two of the procedures they had to call an IV nurse to come do it. I did okay the first two procedures, but ended up in tears when we had the same problem when I went in for the third procedure. I was nervous about what is going on with me and tired of the pain of repeated IV attempts.

    My husband told me that when I go for the CT on Wednesday that I should just tell them right away to call an IV nurse and not let them stick me over and over. But I'm afraid that I would sound like a very demanding, whiny patient and that they probably wouldn't call an IV nurse without doing their own attempts first. I don't want to be "demanding," but my gosh, it hurts when they can't get those IVs in me! So what do you think? Should I tell them to call the IV nurse and not let them attempt? Ugh. I hate this! Of course, I'm also now terrified I have cancer. Any one have any ideas what could be growing in my abdomen other than cancer? This waiting is just really hard.

    Thanks for any advice!

    I know from personal experience how hard waiting for test results can be, but besides it being against the TOS to speculate about your illness, it just might make an already bad situation worse.

    I feel for you, because I've been there, done that and have the t-shirt. I am a 15 year cancer survivor and my veins were and still are terrible. I don't think that you would be demanding if you nicely asked the person to please look and be sure before sticking, and if it's something that isn't right there, to please call the IV team, so that they have something to work with. I'd tell them before the tourniquet is on your arm, like when you arrive for your appointment - because this way they can call and get the appropriate personnel without disrupting the flow of the department. As a nurse who starts at least 10 IVs per day, there are still people where I go to someone who is more experienced, or I'll call the IV team right off the bat. (They really get a little hot under the collar about coming to the ER sometimes, but they will and usually stop being angry at me - the nurse, not with the patient, our IV team is always great to the patients - as soon as they see that we don't want to torture an already sick person with all of us "fishing").

    Please feel free to PM me if you are looking for support during this time. The waiting was the hardest part for me.

    Take care of yourself,
    Blee
    Last edit by Blee O'Myacin on Dec 22, '07

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