What Is The Shift You Will Never Forget? - pg.2 | allnurses

What Is The Shift You Will Never Forget? - page 2

Hello, I'm not a nurse yet, although I have been a Mental Health Tech and a PCT. I love reading your nursing stories on here. I would love to hear about the moments (good or bad) in your... Read More

  1. Visit  bsartor profile page
    0
    Oh my linzjane88 what a heartbreaking shift!
  2. Visit  prnqday profile page
    1
    I have two. One was when I was at clinical and witnessed a pt. throw a PE. He went from being a walkie talkie to throwing up massive amount of blood, and dying. He went from laughing to dying all within 10 minutes.
    Second one was when I saw a steronomy performed at bedside. Once again, this patient appeared to be stable then all of a sudden we were opening up her chest.....
    DeLanaHarvickWannabe likes this.
  3. Visit  MomRN0913 profile page
    0
    Quote from crazy&cuteRN
    I have two. One was when I was at clinical and witnessed a pt. throw a PE. He went from being a walkie talkie to throwing up massive amount of blood, and dying. He went from laughing to dying all within 10 minutes.
    Second one was when I saw a steronomy performed at bedside. Once again, this patient appeared to be stable then all of a sudden we were opening up her chest.....
    Is would be one of mine. I was about 2 mo ths into the ICU when this happened. Nice man, lung CA 60 years old. He had a known embolus. They were waiting transfer out of our community hospital to have this procedure but there were no beds. The goal was to not let this guy cough. I was scared. It was night shift and he had been sleep soundly no coughing for hours. He was due for his codeine, and I saw him standing up to pee in his urinal, got the medicine, came back into the room to settle him him his bed and give him his meds. Nxt second blood out of his nose, coughing it up, he was talking asking for his O2 while this is going on until he went into vfib. It was horrific. He died. I was devastated. The hospitality told me he was a ticking time bomb and there was nothing that could have been done.

    I'll never forget it. My coworkers remembered it for years to come too.
  4. Visit  marycarney profile page
    0
    On the bad side.......

    Had a gentleman with head and neck cancer - advanced. He had a metal trach as I recall. Nice man. He was in ICU, and we were weighing him on the sling-type scale. Got him up in the air and the cancer eroded his carotid artery........
  5. Visit  dandk1997RN profile page
    0
    Quote from marycarney
    On the bad side.......

    Had a gentleman with head and neck cancer - advanced. He had a metal trach as I recall. Nice man. He was in ICU, and we were weighing him on the sling-type scale. Got him up in the air and the cancer eroded his carotid artery........
    That is just about the most awful visual I can imagine.
  6. Visit  marycarney profile page
    0
    Mercifully, it was very, very fast.....
  7. Visit  nrsang97 profile page
    1
    I have a few memorable shifts:

    The time I got the dead pt from the ER. She was not a DNR wither. We coded her got a hold of her family and they had us extubate her immediately. She passed away peacefully after that. The staff still tease me about it 6 years later.

    The shift in the ICU where I had to meet my co worker in IR. I brought the pt back with her and got him hooked up to the ICP monitor and his ICP was 80. He was taken immediately to CT scan and we took him immediately to OR. He was in IR for vasospasam and he started swelling after and we had to take him to OR to remove his bone flap and release pressure. He never did walkout of the hospital. He ended up with a trach and peg and in a nursing home. I have no idea how he is doing now.

    There is the day I walked in had an orientee and a pt who was a GSW to the head through and through. He was tachy for us all shift and febrile. Nothing worked to break the fever. We put in a cooling cath and the he got so cold he was brady. This kid could never regulate his own temp again. He went to OR to have a second bone flap removed. He eventually died in a LTAC.

    I remember the shift we emptied out the unit. They took a nurse from us. We got 5 admits in 2 hours. We got one from OR, one from a sister hospital with a GCS of 5, one from Up North, one from another hospital who was a GCS of 3, and there was another admit I can't remember where they came from. They were mostly critical. I asked for a nurse back and was told no. If not for amazing team work we would have never handled it.

    I remember the day I walked in and we were starting to get 3 admits right away. The first air lifted from a sister hospital and critical. Another from a different sister hospital, critical AVM rupture, and one from the OR who was GSW to the head. Suprisingly the GSW to the head was the least critical. I had to make room for all three of them. We had help from the supervisor to transfer out of the unit the ones who could go. If not for all our team work I have no idea how we would have handled the influx of all these critical patients.
    DeLanaHarvickWannabe likes this.
  8. Visit  eatmysoxRN profile page
    0
    Walked into my job one morning in the small hospital I worked for. Had an ER and a 20 bed med surg unit that accepted any age of patients.

    Had a young child, probably 7, who was on telemetry. That in itself should have flagged that the small hospital was inappropriate placement. The kids vitals were terrible. He looked terrible. I asked the experienced noc nurse why that child was here. She just said because it was ordered...

    As a brand new nurse, the only RN, I was at a loss. I called the pediatrician who was furious that the ER doc admitted the child to our unit. Ended up calling and getting the kid air lifted to the regional children's hospital. I also had 10 other patients and it was me and 2 aides. I was responsible for watching the monitor as well. That poor baby could have died and who knows when the last time a peds code happened at that facility.

    I quit shortly thereafter. I couldn't believe the stuff they allowed to happen there.
  9. Visit  Debilpn23 profile page
    0
    Quote from marycarney
    Mine was my last shift with my home care patient. (I also work in PICU and care for her in both places)

    I started caring for Elizabeth when she was just six months old, newly home from the NICU - trach, home vent and post-Norwood (the first of three planned palliative surgeries for hypoplastic right heart/ pulmonary atresia).

    Three years later she had survived her other two surgeries (barely in the case of #2), a pulmonary hemorrhage, got off the vent and was doing well. She got decannulated and parents no longer needed regular nursing care.

    I had never (obviously) heard Elizabeth's voice. It was my last shift - a rare afternoon shift so mom and dad could go out and celebrate their anniversary. I knocked on the door and mom let me in. From behind the couch- up pops Elizabeth - all smiles. She and mom worked with speech for two weeks on this- my greatest gift. Elizabeth said, "Hi Mary!'

    PS: In the intervening year and a half, Elizabeth's mom has had a healthy son, and in a few months, my girl will start kindergarten.
    Mary
    That is so sweet.
  10. Visit  bell1962 profile page
    0
    Really stupid question...what does NOC nurse stand for?
    My most memorable day was the 1st day of a summer school program with 225 special needs kids. We only had emergency contact information for some kids, really limited medical info , if any. Kids were coming to school with meds in their backpacks (against the law!) with no orders, etc. Total chaos. Trust me, the adminstrators of the program were told a thing or 2.
  11. Visit  brownbook profile page
    0
    I am getting so old. I just tiny snap shot memories and probably the details are somewhat inaccurate.

    I was the night supervisor. Probably the patient, a young man, was brought in via ambulance code blue, full blown AIDS. He made it to ICU but it was just for comfort care, DNR, he was expected to die imminently. He died without further interventions, I stepped outside the ICU doors and a young man was there. I asked if I could help him, he said he was here for ______, how was he doing. I told him I was sorry but he had died.

    I got the strongest overwhelming feeling that I was to give the man a hug. I think I even made a small move, stepped forward, to do so, but something stopped me? To this day I regret I did not give that man a hug.
  12. Visit  brownbook profile page
    0
    PS....no it was not fear of catching HIV that stopped me....more of this is awkward I don't know this man type of thing.
  13. Visit  KelRN215 profile page
    3
    The shift I will never, ever forget happened one Thursday night into Friday... Friday the thirteenth. I was caring for one of my primary patients- an infant with hydrocephalus whose case easily would have gone to court had her parents not been teenagers without a clue. Initially, she presented from another hospital with a shunt infection. For reasons unknown to any of us nurses, our team was dead set on not putting her shunt back in. Infant had proven herself time and time again to be shunt dependent but the surgical team (led by the Fellow) felt that they could leave her with no drainage method and she'd be ok. Originally, she'd had external drains because of her infection. She failed every clamp trial they'd done but still they pulled her drain. The first time they did this, she was emergently in the OR within 12 hours having it replaced and had bled from the pressure. Because the blood blocked the communication between her ventricles, she ended up with two external drains. They eventually weaned her down to one. I had taken care of her the night before and she was supposed to be in the OR that Thursday morning to have her shunt replaced. On a whim, they decided to again try pulling her drain instead of her going to the OR to get her shunt. I was royally mad when I came in that Thursday night and heard what happened and knew immediately "we'll be in the OR emergently by the morning." By midnight, her respiratory rate was in the teens (she was 4 months old), she wouldn't wake to feed, her fontanelle was bulging and her pupils were sluggish. I will never forgot wheeling her crib down to a stat CT- she didn't flinch as we banged around the corner or ran the crib over bumps. After the results of the CT came back, it was clear she needed the OR and needed it now. The Resident made her NPO, ordered pre-op labs and told us she was going to the OR. I remember that I didn't hear from the OR so I called them to see what was going on. Their response? "We haven't heard from the Surgeon and our team is currently in a case. We would have to call in our on-call team and the Attending needs to call us." Turns out the Attending decided this could wait until normal business hours and soon the Chief Resident appeared and said "we're going to tap the baby's fontanelle." Several failed attempts before he finally withdrew something like 8 cc of bloody CSF from her. She remained lethargic with sluggish pupils and low O2 sats the whole night. The last thing I did that morning was run her to the OR at 6:30. I remember my boss coming in the next morning, hearing the story in report and saying "Kel, if this was your baby, what would you think/what would you do?" And I remember saying "If this was my baby, I would have had a lawyer a month ago." My boss agreed and said her next call would be to the press if it was her child. So many things were done wrong by this baby, so many things that I'm convinced wouldn't have happened if her parents hadn't been teenagers or had known how to advocate for her. She was back for urgent/emergent procedures at least once a month for the next several months. I have long since lost track of how many times I personally took her emergently to the OR.

    It was when I finally got home that morning, around 9am, that I realized "it's Friday the thirteenth."


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