Seniority

  1. My faculty had adopted a new policy where seniority doesn't play a factor at all in obtaining new positions. A nurse who has only been there a year has an equal opportunity as a nurse who had been there for decades for any open position. The way a new position is chosen is through a peer interview. Whoever gets the most points when answering interview questions gets the position. I was wondering what other nurses thoughts are on this?
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  2. 60 Comments

  3. by   llg
    I think that the new system sounds horrible -- making it totally a "popularity" contest with no consideration of qualifications. The voting system opens the door to discrimination based on looks, race, gender, religion, having friends on the interview panel, etc. It also makes it difficult/impossible to hold anyone accountable for the hiring decisions. Horrible decision by whoever is allowing it.
  4. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from lexyrn71
    My faculty had adopted a new policy where seniority doesn't play a factor at all in obtaining new positions. A nurse who has only been there a year has an equal opportunity as a nurse who had been there for decades for any open position. The way a new position is chosen is through a peer interview. Whoever gets the most points when answering interview questions gets the position. I was wondering what other nurses thoughts are on this?
    What type of "open position" are we talking about? Advancement? Change in shift? Different department?
    What types of questions are asked for points and who's awarding and calculating the points? And how are the interviewing peers selected?

    I could take it or leave it based on the answers to the above questions. I've known horrible employees with lots of seniority, so I'm not sure that's always the answer when it comes to fairness.
  5. by   Davey Do
    At Wrongway Regional Medical Center, we have a saying that goes, "Administration can do whatever they want whenever they want".

    For example, the LCSW who use to supervise the Therapists got her RN and was made Nursing Supervisor of the Adult Psych Units. This person has never worked as a Nurse, merely obtained the degree and the license, and has since moved into a higher position.

    Her former Nursing Supervisory position was taken over by a relatively new Nurse who did not want to work the mandatory 12 hour shifts that started in Psych last February. Since the new Nurse was a friend of the Director of Psych Services, the 8 hour salaried position was given to her.

    Supposedly the positions were posted and bid upon, but the circumstantial evidence speaks for itself.

    Oh- BTW, lexyrn: Welcome to AN.com!
  6. by   That Guy
    If it means you start hiring the best people for the job instead of just the person who was there the longest, I see nothing wrong with it.
  7. by   jadeclnc
    You are so correct. Now nursing advancement depends on whose your buddy. Not at all about dedication, skills, or education. If you don't play the game you don't stand a chance. You have techs that are the eyes and ears of management. Its sad that nursing has become a career based on personality.
    The senior nurses are terminated in such a way employers bypass the age discrimination laws.
    Age discrimination is still alive and well. If a nurse is terminated the employer may place the nurse on as a no rehire and this is placed on the information from the credit bureau. Texas nurses opposed this way of discriminating because nurses could not get jobs.
  8. by   RNperdiem
    In the working world, valuing seniority is going the way of the pension, company loyalty, and the retirement gold watch.
    Seniority tells you how long someone has worked somewhere. It does not tell you how good they are.
    I have worked per diem in my unit for a long time and to be honest, many of the younger staff are way better than me. They join commitees, gain certifications, are often in charge, become ECMO trained, and go for the hard assignments. Working full time and going full steam earned them their reputations. I did none of those things; my focus has been on family and work was more of a job than a career.
    I would never begrudge them any new positions and success.
  9. by   Cvepo
    Quote from That Guy
    If it means you start hiring the best people for the job instead of just the person who was there the longest, I see nothing wrong with it.
    ^^This. Seniority blows, and is often used by the older generation of entitled nurses who feel that they have "earned" everything that they can possibly get. I use the example when it comes to transferring to ICU, because I've known many excellent floor nurses get denied ICU positions because of seniority, even if the senior nurse taking the position is completely unable to handle an ICU position, but thought "only 2 patients" would be easier.

    I think it's a grave error to assume that just because someone has been with a company for a while that they are the best fit for a role.
  10. by   nursel56
    Quote from lexyrn71
    The way a new position is chosen is through a peer interview. Whoever gets the most points when answering interview questions gets the position. I was wondering what other nurses thoughts are on this?
    The entire process is a peer interview? That sounds like a recipe for disaster.

    On the broader question, seniority in the absence of any other qualifications doesn't make for a cohesive team either, I feel there's a definite and ongoing attitude shift in the workplace.

    Seniority seems to represent nothing more than chair-warming and obstructing the upward mobility of ambitious people coming up from behind, which is no longer offset by a recognition on the part of the employer and peers that years on the job would be acknowledged in some manner other than qualifying you for more paid time off.
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from Cvepo
    ^^This. Seniority blows, and is often used by the older generation of entitled nurses who feel that they have "earned" everything that they can possibly get. I use the example when it comes to transferring to ICU, because I've known many excellent floor nurses get denied ICU positions because of seniority, even if the senior nurse taking the position is completely unable to handle an ICU position, but thought "only 2 patients" would be easier.

    I think it's a grave error to assume that just because someone has been with a company for a while that they are the best fit for a role.
    I am not entitled, but "older" and you're damn right I earned what I have gotten by experience, time put in and blood/sweat/tears.

    I find just as many "entitled" young ones who say to the older ones, (right here on this site no less) "why don't you retire so we get can jobs?" My answer: "when you pay my mortgage, utilities, food, etc YOU CAN HAVE IT". Til then, deal. We all worked for what we got and earned what we have now and never expected anyone to give it to us.

    Entitlement indeed.
  12. by   That Guy
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I am not entitled, but "older" and you're damn right I earned what I have gotten by experience, time put in and blood/sweat/tears.
    Doesn't mean you are qualified for promotions/new positions
  13. by   klone
    Quote from That Guy
    If it means you start hiring the best people for the job instead of just the person who was there the longest, I see nothing wrong with it.
    Exactly this. I think the peer interview is an incredibly important part of the process. I am in favor of hiring the person who is the most qualified and best fit for the position, rather than the person who has been there the longest.
  14. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from That Guy
    If it means you start hiring the best people for the job instead of just the person who was there the longest, I see nothing wrong with it.
    Define "best".

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