resignation without good recommendation

  1. i've handed my resignation letter yesterday giving the facility about a week and a half to look for a replacement for me...since i'm off the following days i figure might as well place the end date on my last day of work. my DNS called me this morning telling me that she will NOT give me a good recommendation because i didn't give them 2 weeks notice. mind you, they know before hand that i have plans of moving and i was just waiting for my husbands work to give us the go signal. i've worked there for a year, worked almost every weekend with 30-50 patients. they didn't hear any complaints from my co-workers/patients about me . now i'm being treated like i did some major mistake by her not giving good recommendation. should i be worry about this? would it affect my future employment?
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   RNPATL
    Quote from reyna
    i've handed my resignation letter yesterday giving the facility about a week and a half to look for a replacement for me...since i'm off the following days i figure might as well place the end date on my last day of work. my DNS called me this morning telling me that she will NOT give me a good recommendation because i didn't give them 2 weeks notice. mind you, they know before hand that i have plans of moving and i was just waiting for my husbands work to give us the go signal. i've worked there for a year, worked almost every weekend with 30-50 patients. they didn't hear any complaints from my co-workers/patients about me . now i'm being treated like i did some major mistake by her not giving good recommendation. should i be worry about this? would it affect my future employment?
    In most States, employment is "at will" and you may terminate that employment or your employer may terminate your employment. I think the best piece of advice I can give you is to be sure you provide your employer with proper notice in order to ensure that you are eligible for re-hire. You don't want to burn bridges. However, with that said, it is the policy of most companies to confirm dates of employment and position held. Most companies to not want to have the liability of giving a reference that may not be accurate. I am sure the DNS was blowing smoke when she said this because if she did give a poor recommendation, you could and should sue her.

    That is how I see it and I am sure most labor attorneys would agree.
  4. by   RN4NICU
    I've heard the way some employers get around the "slander" liability thing is to ask if the employee is eligible for rehire. To state yes or no provides factual information only (the person is or is not...black or white). They do not have to answer why or why not.

    In hospitals, most references are handled by the HR department which will usually only confirm dates of employment. I'm guessing by the OP's reference to working with 30-50 patients that this was a LTC facility. I have no idea how they handle references...

    I agree about burning bridges, though. You never know who is going to know someone from your past (unofficially of course) down the line. Especially since there is a tendency in nursing to change jobs like many people change clothes (after all, you've gotta do something to fend off burnout as long as you can).

    I hope everything works out for you.
  5. by   hipab4hands
    [QUOTE=RNPATL]In most States, employment is "at will" and you may terminate that employment or your employer may terminate your employment.


    Don't worry about it. I got my current job without references from the prior employer.

    I didn't give my prior employer 2 weeks notice either. My contract was an "at will", so I wasn't under any obligation to give them 2 weeks notice. My supervisor tried to tell me that I was required to give them 2 weeks notice also. I asked her if they give employees 2 weeks notice , before they fire or terminate them. She told me No. My answer to her is if they wouldn't be "courteous" to the employees by giving them 2 weeks notice, then I wasn't under any obligation to give them 2 weeks notice either.
  6. by   ADNCyn
    [QUOTE=hipab4hands]
    Quote from RNPATL
    In most States, employment is "at will" and you may terminate that employment or your employer may terminate your employment.


    Don't worry about it. I got my current job without references from the prior employer.

    I didn't give my prior employer 2 weeks notice either. My contract was an "at will", so I wasn't under any obligation to give them 2 weeks notice. My supervisor tried to tell me that I was required to give them 2 weeks notice also. I asked her if they give employees 2 weeks notice , before they fire or terminate them. She told me No. My answer to her is if they wouldn't be "courteous" to the employees by giving them 2 weeks notice, then I wasn't under any obligation to give them 2 weeks notice either.
    Well put!!! So, how bout these facilities telling you as a new RN that they want you to give them a year with them, but it's not written anywhere, just spoken. What then? If you decide to leave before that year.
  7. by   reyna
    I asked her if they give employees 2 weeks notice , before they fire or terminate them
    hahaha...i like that. this same facility put their troubled staff on call but never calls them. forcing people to quit rather than fire them so they don't have to pay unemployment. i'm really not worried about burning any bridges. also, i never signed any contract with them. i've work in this facility for about a year and i've gone through4 DNSes already. that tells you something huh?
  8. by   Jailhouse RN
    In NY all they can say is "you worked there form this date to this date". That is ALL they are allowed to say. There is no recommendation. When you apply for another job just use your work evaluations as part of your application package. I am sure you will do just fine.
    Last edit by Jailhouse RN on Jul 10, '04 : Reason: cap not in place.
  9. by   futurenurse2
    I remember hearing that in some states they are allowed to ask "Would you hire this individual again?"

    If you're that nervous about it, tell her that you want to leave on good terms with the hospital and that if you need to work the two weeks, you will.

    In a few months, when you're trying to get a new position or you need a recommendation for something, you may be glad you did. Who wants their next job to hinge on how they left their last?
  10. by   nightingale
    You could use your last appraisal for a reference.

    Could you give them their customary and work around those times when you are off? It seems very unfair and I am sorry they are being unkind. Good riddens to them!

    Lift your chin up and move on; better days are ahead.

    I always use two good contacts of friends on the job who have been charge nurses etc. Believe me, your new employer will be relieved to have someone willing to work so many weekends.
    Last edit by nightingale on Jul 10, '04
  11. by   Tweety
    Don't worry about it! Good luck!
  12. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from nightngale1998
    ... Lift your chin up and move on...
    And continue to learn.
  13. by   canoehead
    Even if they decided to blackball you at the last minute the quick fix for that is to bring a copy of your last evaluation to the job interview. Just tell the interviewer you are aware that the last hospital you worked at has a policy of not giving out references, so you decided to provide your (glowing, of course) evaluation for their information.

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