Recruiting and hiring

  1. 0
    I am informally polling my peers to find out the general recruitment practices and attitudes in your area. I will also discuss briefly my own experience here in Las Vegas.

    Nevada has the fewest nurses per 100,000 population of any state in the country - due in large part to the booming growth in Las Vegas. The city's population is growing at the rate of 6,000 residents per month, and it grew by 83% between the 1990 and 2000 censuses. We now have over 1.5 million permanent residents, plus 200,000-300,000 tourists at any given time.

    In theory, this should translate to a large numbers of medical jobs available. In practice, jobs are proving elusive despite the fact that almost every hospital here has an expansion project underway. Applications are met with apparent ambivalence, and there are few followup contacts by employers. It is almost a necessity to work a place from the inside in order to get hired, which you cannot do unless you know someone there. My experience has been that the nursing shortage here is partially self-inflicted.

    My wife and I are both nurses, and we have both struggled to find work in an area of severe nursing shortage. Nursing friends of ours have reported similar experiences. Employers in Las Vegas seem indifferent, do not follow up on applications for months (and sometimes not at all), and will not hire someone who does not have the exact background they are looking for. I worked in mental health and was thrown out of work when my hospital's parent company closed my facility. I drew unemployment for three months, because no hospital would even talk to me. At the time, I had five years of nursing experience, all in a supervisory capacity, and a national certification.

    Is our experience typical, or is this peculiar to our market?
    Last edit by Orca on Aug 23, '02

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  2. 31 Comments...

  3. 0
    Sounds about right! Then when you get in you are treated like dirt and want to leave. And they wonder why there is a shortage!! I have a friend with 10+ years ICU/CCU/Cath Lab/EPS, blah, blah, blah experience and she was unable to find a job other than per diem. In NJ many places just don't want experienced people because they have to pay them a few dollars more. SAD STATE OF AFFAIRS IF YOU ASK ME!!!!
  4. 0
    I currently work in LTC, but it does seem that where I live, although everyone is complaining of a nursing shortage...no one is hiring nurses!
    Strange, isn' t it?
  5. 0
    Hello. II live in OHio. I applied at OSU med center in March and did not get offered a position until July and cannot get in orientation until September. Luckily I work another job to supplement my income or else I could not have waited.

    renerian
  6. 0
    Yep, I live in Florida. I just graduated a couple of weeks ago and applied to about 5 different hospitals I got interviews a 2 and the process was slow, I did finally get hired at one and the others just never seemed interested. It did'nt help though that a huge group of students graduated a couple of months before our class and got all the good positions.
  7. 0
    Thank you all for your responses so far.

    Your response hits home for me, graduate_2002. I graduated from nursing school in Oklahoma City in December 1994. The Oklahoma Board of Nursing asked that all nursing schools with graduating classes turn in a list of graduates' credentials by December 21, so that they could be processed before Christmas. My nursing school, for whatever reason, decided not to turn in credentials until after the New Year's break. Students from other schools already had their licenses by the time we began getting our authorizations to take the board exam. At the time, few hospitals were hiring, and it put us at a severe disadvantage in getting jobs. Not only were other classes graduating, but we were lagging over a month behind them in getting licenses. My school was reprimanded by the Board of Nursing, but the damage had already been done for my classmates, many of whom did not find full-time work for over a year after we graduated.

    Fortunately, I had gotten a job offer from a hospital that was willing to wait and, because I had taken PN boards after my third semester, I was able to start orientation before I took RN boards. Still, it forced me to work for over a month at less than $8 per hour.

    I also see a lot of truth in the response by fedupnurse. When Charter Behavioral Health closed my mental health facility in February 2000, I applied for a per diem job on the geropsych unit at a local hospital. The clerk in HR said, "They should be calling you soon. We almost never get an application for that job." The ad for the position continued to run week after week, as I drew unemployment and was being paid $279 per week. I followed up with telephone calls. No response. I finally got a call for an interview in November - eight months after my application. The call was from a newly-hired nurse manager, who was going through the things left behind by her predecessor. She said that my application had apparently been sitting there ever since I initially applied.

    Best of luck in your new career, graduate_2002. You will need it.
    Last edit by Orca on Aug 23, '02
  8. 0
    Originally posted by Orca
    Thank you all for your responses so far.

    Your response hits home for me, graduate_2002. I graduated from nursing school in Oklahoma City in December 1994. The Oklahoma Board of Nursing asked that all nursing schools with graduating classes turn in a list of graduates' credentials by December 21, so that they could be processed before Christmas. My nursing school, for whatever reason, decided not to turn in credentials until after the New Year's break. Students from other schools already had their licenses by the time we began getting our authorizations to test for the board exam. At the time, few hospitals were hiring, and it put us at a severe disadvantage in getting jobs. Not only were other classes graduating, but we were lagging over a month behind them in getting licenses. My school was reprimanded by the Board of Nursing, but the damage had already been done for me and my classmates, many of whom did not find full-time work for over a year after we graduated.

    Fortunately, I had gotten a job offer from a hospital that was willing to wait and, because I had taken PN boards after my third semester, I was able to start orientation before I took RN boards. Still, it forced me to work for over a month at less than $8 per hour.

    I also see a lot of truth in the response by fedupnurse. When Charter Behavioral Health closed my mental health facility in February 2000, I applied for a per diem job on the geropsych unit at a local hospital. The clerk in HR said, "They should be calling you soon. We almost never get an application for that job." The ad for the position continued to run week after week, as I drew unemployment and was being paid $279 per week. I followed up with telephone calls. No response. I finally got a call for an interview in November - eight months after my application. The call was from a newly-hired nurse manager, who was going through the things left behind by her predecessor. She said that my application had apparently been sitting there ever since I initially applied.

    Best of luck in your new career, graduate_2002. You will need it.
    I wish I'd had the option of taking the PN boards... the way our program was set up we couldn't do that
    i've been hearing that we'll have to wait about 6 weeks for the state to process our applications and send the ATT, so it looks like i may end up working as a tech until it comes.
    I wish you the best of luck in your career as well Orca
  9. 0
    Well, ,Orca, that is a whale of a story! (couldn't resist).
    Your tale sounds about right, no matter what state you are in or how "desperate" they are for nurses.

    Unwilling to train new hires to specialties, they want what they want and only what they want and exactly when they want it, unwillingness to be flexible about scheduling, on and on.

    What is comes down to is:

    1) however "short" they are of nurses, they know that whoever is still with them will fill in the gaps ("for the good of the patients" as these overworked nurses would put it, which simply perpetuates short-staffing)--with consequent lower overall labor costs, which in turn makes the managers look good to the bean-counters

    2) "THEY" aren't the patients lying in bed with too few nurses to take care of them

    3) see #1, above.

    You see why people like to do agency/travel nursing? At least there you can quickly figure out where you actually stand.
    Last edit by sjoe on Aug 23, '02
  10. 0
    Sometimes I think the nurse recruiters have no clue the hospital needs nurses (NOW) and that there is a shortage of nurses (NOW).
    I also believe based on totally unscientific observation that something things continue to work or not work they way they do at hospitals because of something in the pipes. No matter how the system is modified or changed, it still works the same way. No matter who owns the place, it works the same way. No matter how long it exists, it works the same way. Has to be in the pipes. But even getting new pipes or a new building doesn't help. Maybe it's like radon, just there and you can't get rid of it.

    Both hospitals where I work have dysfunctional nurse recruitment. Getting in to apply isn't hard, getting a call back is a miracle.

    I do know the corporate level suits of the company I work for are evaluating every hospital on number of new hires per month, new grads hired, terminations, and terminations in less than a year require exact reasons as to why they happened and apparently death is the only acceptable (to corporate) answer as to why someone doesn't stay a year.

    I won't say things should start to look up in Vegas but you never know. It comes down to being persistent. The best way I know of to get in is to get the name of the manager of the area you're interested in and call that person directly. The hospital operator will usually give this information as everyone is worried about customer service these days and the unit manager is the first person complaints go to, so their names are easy to get.
  11. 0
    I see the oppostie side. We advertise a position, list the qualifications, and boom!. Last time we advertised for a contract nurse, RN, recent jail setting preferred, but must have recent ICU, ER experiencem $30-$33/hr.
    We had 40 applications, 9 from CNA's who thought it would be swell to make that kind of money, 13 were LVN's and of the 18 remaining who were RN's, 1 hadn't worked in 6 years because of a drug conviction, 1 couldn't start for 6 months, 13 had no ICU, ER or jail experience, and 1 wanted only full time days.

    We ended up waiting for the one who couldn't start for 6 months as she was the ONLY 1 qualified.

    During the application process, we also discovered that of the 13 LVN's 4 of them didn't specify that they were LVN's and it was only after they got to the oral interview that it came out. 1 actually put on her resume that she WAS an RN,(but-hey, she's going back to school someday),

    I was apalled, but not surprised. I think too many people have the attitude that, hey, they're desperate and they can train me. That's fine, IF th employer advertises it will train you, but come on!! Am I wrong to feel this way?


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