Pink Tolerance

by Ruby Vee 7,479 Views | 30 Comments

I've always hated pink. Red was MY color; pink was more my sister's color. As it turns out, I've become more "pink tolerant" since I had breast cancer.

  1. 41

    Pink Tolerance

    I've always hated pink. My color was RED, my sister's was pink. Then I had breast cancer. The fateful mammogram was two years ago, and I had my oncology visit at the Breast Center this afternoon. When I walked back into my house afterward, I realized that the pen sitting by the telephone is pink -- even has a pink ribbon on the clip. No one else brought that pen into the house -- it was me. The lock that I use when I go to the gym to introduce my titanium knees to the treadmill . . . pink, with a breast cancer ribbon on the dial. That was me, too. And the sneakers I had to buy this year in order to introduce my titanium parts to the treadmill . . . the color is listed as "Susan J. Komen". They're pink. The pink orchid in a pink cup sitting on the kitchen counter was the child's contribution, but when she gave it to me I didn't protest. Time was, I would have objected strenuously to the gift of anything pink from my family -- they should know better! I have ALWAYS hated pink.

    It turns out, I've become more pink tolerant after having breast cancer. I've got a pink breast cancer ribbon on my name badge at work. My co-chair on the Orientation Committee ordered 100 of them for our staff of 91 right after I went out on Medical Leave, and they all disappeared within a week. The NPs, Pas and MDs were wearing them in addition to our staff. Pharmacy, RT, OT and PT wore them in my honor. Iza had to order 100 more, and when I came back to work there were just enough to give me two. (I lost the first one the first day -- but that's a story for a "stupid nurse tricks" thread.)

    The woman who did my bone scan before I started hormone therapy gave me a pink scarf. She asked me why I was having the bone scan, and I told her and then she told me that SHE was a breast cancer survivor of 20 years, and that the worst thing about the whole breast cancer ordeal was telling her mother. Luckily, I was spared that. My mother was already in the middle -to- end stages of her Alzheimer's, and she wouldn't have understood who I was or why she should care about my breast cancer, but the whole discussion would have made her sad. So we didn't have it. I told my aunts instead.

    I had an easy ride with the breast cancer, as such things go. I was diagnosed early, the tumor was small and the sentinel nodes were clear. I was spared chemotherapy, and although the surgery and radiation therapy weren't a picnic, I was so lucky and grateful to have been spared chemo. I had plenty of breast tissue to spare, and after the bilateral lumpectomy and reconstruction, I still had plenty of breast tissue, but a whole lot less of it. What's there is real. I'm lucky there, too.

    I've been a survivor for a year and a half. My chances of a recurrence lessen every year, and I'm optimistic about the future.

    I stopped at the mall on the way home, and one of the things I bought was nail polish. It's pink.
    Last edit by Joe V on Mar 8
    miszsantiago, twinkletoes53, Suey816, and 38 others like this.
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  3. About Ruby Vee

    Ruby Vee joined Jun '02 - from 'the Midwest'. Ruby Vee has '38' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'ICU/CCU'. Posts: 8,427 Likes: 30,008; Learn more about Ruby Vee by visiting their allnursesPage


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    30 Comments so far...

  4. 3
    Same club but I really dislike the pink for breast cancer awareness. Pink is supposed to be cheerful.
    Fiona59, Ruby Vee, and SwansonRN like this.
  5. 1
    Hugs!! So glad you're well now
    Esme12 likes this.
  6. 4


    Thanks for sharing Ruby. I love that you had so much support at your work when going through everything. Awesome.
    Esme12, Nurse Leigh, Ruby Vee, and 1 other like this.
  7. 4

    I'm so glad you're well and hope your dance with cancer is over. (((Ruby)))

    I was going to write about my personal feelings about "pinkwashing," but decided to keep this thread positive. Funny coincidence: As I'm typing this, there was a commercial from Kohls about "Getting your pink on."

    I love the story about the pink ribbons, Ruby. Sounds like you have some great co-workers.


    Lev <3, SoldierNurse22, Esme12, and 1 other like this.
  8. 4
    I am glad you are in the pink Ruby.

    I am a little overwhelmed with the pink thing though in the promotion.

    When they started having pink recycling containers, I thought it was a bit much.
    SoldierNurse22, Ruby Vee, Fiona59, and 1 other like this.
  9. 11
    I though pink got out of hand when NFL players started wearing it.

    To be honest, I refuse to buy pink. I hate to think that my mother's colon cancer (which killed her), my father's Hodgkins' lymphoma, or multiple other relatives' cancers are somehow less important because they didn't occur in the breast.
    csweet, Mommy&RN, Lev <3, and 8 others like this.
  10. 6
    I lost my mom to breast cancer. The October pinkwashing of the grocery store/drugstore/hospital/gas station is a painful reminder every year. And it makes me wonder how much of that money is actually going to a good cause.
    csweet, Mommy&RN, SoldierNurse22, and 3 others like this.
  11. 4
    That being said, Ruby, your contributions to this forum are always insightful. So on that note, I'm glad you're in the pink, as a previous poster said.
    Lev <3, SoldierNurse22, OCNRN63, and 1 other like this.
  12. 1
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    I’ve always hated pink. My color was RED, my sister’s was pink. Then I had breast cancer. The fateful mammogram was two years ago, and I had my oncology visit at the Breast Center this afternoon. When I walked back into my house afterward, I realized that the pen sitting by the telephone is pink -- even has a pink ribbon on the clip. No one else brought that pen into the house -- it was me. The lock that I use when I go to the gym to introduce my titanium knees to the treadmill . . . pink, with a breast cancer ribbon on the dial. That was me, too. And the sneakers I had to buy this year in order to introduce my titanium parts to the treadmill . . . the color is listed as “Susan J. Komen”. They’re pink. The pink orchid in a pink cup sitting on the kitchen counter was the child’s contribution, but when she gave it to me I didn’t protest. Time was, I would have objected strenuously to the gift of anything pink from my family -- they should know better! I have ALWAYS hated pink.

    It turns out, I’ve become more pink tolerant after having breast cancer. I’ve got a pink breast cancer ribbon on my name badge at work. My co-chair on the Orientation Committee ordered 100 of them for our staff of 91 right after I went out on Medical Leave, and they all disappeared within a week. The NPs, Pas and MDs were wearing them in addition to our staff. Pharmacy, RT, OT and PT wore them in my honor. Iza had to order 100 more, and when I came back to work there were just enough to give me two. (I lost the first one the first day -- but that’s a story for a “stupid nurse tricks” thread.)

    The woman who did my bone scan before I started hormone therapy gave me a pink scarf. She asked me why I was having the bone scan, and I told her and then she told me that SHE was a breast cancer survivor of 20 years, and that the worst thing about the whole breast cancer ordeal was telling her mother. Luckily, I was spared that. My mother was already in the middle -to- end stages of her Alzheimer’s, and she wouldn’t have understood who I was or why she should care about my breast cancer, but the whole discussion would have made her sad. So we didn’t have it. I told my aunts instead.

    I had an easy ride with the breast cancer, as such things go. I was diagnosed early, the tumor was small and the sentinel nodes were clear. I was spared chemotherapy, and although the surgery and radiation therapy weren’t a picnic, I was so lucky and grateful to have been spared chemo. I had plenty of breast tissue to spare, and after the bilateral lumpectomy and reconstruction, I still had plenty of breast tissue, but a whole lot less of it. What’s there is real. I’m lucky there, too.

    I’ve been a survivor for a year and a half. My chances of a recurrence lessen every year, and I’m optimistic about the future.

    I stopped at the mall on the way home, and one of the things I bought was nail polish. It’s pink.
    Hugs Ruby
    I am also am a breast cancer survivor. I was diagnosed in May of 2012. Also was fortunate to not need chemo. Like you said radiation and lumpectomy was no picnic.
    Hugs to you.
    Esme12 likes this.


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