Oops, sorry! Son got wrong vaccination - page 7

My son is 8 years old. He had a well-child check up Friday. NP said he's due for varrivax booster and they also recommend Hep A. I had never heard of Hep A for kids. She said that it's not a new... Read More

  1. by   daisey_may
    Quote from LPNtoBSNstudent
    I replyed the way I did to show there was likely NO HARM DONE that would warrent a lawsuit.
    This is already a bad situation--if harm was done to the child, it would get a lot worse.

    No, maybe this isn't lawsuit material, but this isn't a situation to forgive and forget, love, peace, lets kiss and make up. And it would have been a lot different if the person who gave the immunization would have apologized or somehow attempted to make amends to the mother. This isn't about nurses eating their young, either, it's about patient's rights. A mother refused an immunization for her child, yet it was given anyway. There was a breakdown in the system, whether it was a single person, or twenty people. And, something should be done about it.

    Everyone here knows that this is just a single case right here and it happens to be someone who knows what their rights are as a patient. This probably happens all of the time--maybe even at that clinic! It IS a problem that needs to be addressed, and there are right ways and wrong ways to do it.
  2. by   mamason
    Quote from LPNtoBSNstudent
    Well, I am still surprised about this whole post. I completely understand why someone would be upset if this happened to their child. But to completely blow it out of proportion like this....? I am really dumbfounded. 8 pages of responses and almost everyone is ready to hang her.

    I really don't understand why our profession does this to each other.
    I understand that vaccinations ARE a good thing. But, not for every child. They should not be given to:
    1: anyone who has ever had a severe allergic reation to a previous dose.
    2:Anyone who has a severe allergy to any vaccine component
    3: Anyone who is moderately/severely ill at the time of the injection.

    Did any of these questions get asked to the mother before administering the vaccincation? Maybe myself and other posters are concerned that the proper protacols were not followed. There are guidelines that SHOULD be followed to ensure safe administration. Especially with a child. One poster even stated that her son suffers from allergic reactions to vaccinations. As she stated,"What if?" To blow this off and say"WEll, no harm done," is an insult to our profession. I can only speak for myself, but, I assume, that most of us in our profession take the extra time to ensure that proper standards are taken when administering medications. So...I am dumbfounded as to why someone wouldn't think this was a big deal. As you stated, you work in a clinic that administers vaccinations on a daily basis. You may be used to it. Just, like some of us who work in cardiac feel that an angioplasty procedure is an everyday thing. But, to the families on the recieving end, it is a BIG DEAL. And yes, we may be blowing this situation out of porportion, but, doesn't that tell you something? If a nurse is overloaded due to short staffing or high acuity, then yes, med errors can occur. I would understand that. And no, I wouldn't be willing to automatically "HANG HER." Ususally that person is extremely upset over the mistake. From the descripton of the situation from the OP, this nurse/MA just blew it off as if it wasn't a big deal. That's an insult to everyone in our profession. Should someone try to sue over this, probably not. Should the person administering the vaccincation be reprimanded? YES.Should this person be made to take a refresher course in proper drug administration? YES. Should she be allowed to administer medication unsupervised? Not until she could prove that she is following proper guidelines. Not only does it tarnish our reputation as nurses/MA's, but, what about the MD'S office. Do you think someone isn't going to retell their bad experience to someone else? Happens all the time and word of mouth travels FAST.
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    I dont even know what to say about this post. No one here is even making a agrument about receiving/benifits of immunizations or even the s/e of the medications. However, the person administering the medications was rude, rough and did not follow Dr. orders putting that child at risk. What if the child had a allergy to the medication or it was being held for whatever reason. If this had been your child would you just say a couple of words to the office manager and chalk it up to being a mistake and go on about your day. I dont really think so..... I am thinking like a mother here and not a nurse. It is my job to protect my children and I make it my buisness to know what is being given to my children. I dont know about the laws for requiring signatures for immunizations, but I do know you cant just give these type of immunizations without consent. I am in charge of their healthcare and I have the final decision PERIOD. Im not sure what kinda system problem you see, because I see a problem a whole lot bigger than the system. The staff member in question didnt follow orders and this could have been a hugh problem for the child .. thank God is was not. But how many more kids has this person given injections too or taken care of. Saying a couple of words to the office manager is just not enough. It would be one thing if the Nurse/MA admitted to the mistake and apologized. But this person see's no mistake and in my opinion does not know her limitations. Now, I dont think I made any comments towards securing a attorney personally . Because thats just not my way of taking care of buisness.
    I agree with you 100 percent. ATTITUDE is EVERYTHING. I am not into lynching people for making errors, we all do. But this does not seem like a person who is likely willing to update assumptions and practices. She is not even very nice to the patients. I have a real problem with that.
  4. by   Tweety
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I agree with you 100 percent. ATTITUDE is EVERYTHING. I am not into lynching people for making errors, we all do. But this does not seem like a person who is likely willing to update assumptions and practices. She is not even very nice to the patients. I have a real problem with that.

    I agree Deb. One can look at the process and help prevent this type of error from happening again. Errors happen, you review the process, and you fix the problem. If we lynched and sued everytime someone made an error that didn't cause any harm, there would be no nurses or med techs left. (Naturally if it were my child I might feel different).

    However, this person's attitude needs some major adjustment and needs to be dealt with in a swift manner.

    I would follow up and follow up and follow up again "what kind of counseling did this person receive??", "what did you change to prevent this error". I would be talking to the MD, the office manager, everyone. But getting a lawyer......probably not.
    Last edit by Tweety on Oct 3, '06
  5. by   ZASHAGALKA
    While I agree that seeking the full redress of the legal system is probably not in order, it IS a powerful leverage to seek the actual redress that you feel is adequate.

    That office HAS to know that, if you CHOSE to seek legal redress, the liability could be huge.

    Use that to your advantage. I'd make sure that they KNOW that the only way to avoid legal action is to address your concerns short of that. And that means more than a stern 'talking to'.

    I'd ask for proof or reprimand and a detailed explanation of the consequences of that reprimand.

    A lawsuit might not be in order, but that doesn't mean that it isn't or can't be appropriate leverage for actions that ARE in order.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  6. by   txspadequeenRN
    I am really dumbfounded that anyone would take this lightly. I dont think everyone is ready to hang her , but I think the majority here want more than a couple of words to the office manager.


    Quote from LPNtoBSNstudent
    Well, I am still surprised about this whole post. I completely understand why someone would be upset if this happened to their child. But to completely blow it out of proportion like this....? I am really dumbfounded. 8 pages of responses and almost everyone is ready to hang her.

    I really don't understand why our profession does this to each other.
  7. by   Tweety
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    I am really dumbfounded that anyone would take this lightly. I dont think everyone is ready to hang her , but I think the majority here want more than a couple of words to the office manager.

    There were a few cries of "assault!" "lawsuit!".....etc. So I'm not quite so dumbfounded, and I don't think they mean to take it "lightly" either, although I can see how you're interpreting it that way. Sure this poster doesn't mean to advise just ignoring it.

    Being the lone ranger opinion on a thread isn't easy always to get your point across. Been there and done that.
    Last edit by Tweety on Oct 3, '06
  8. by   TrudyRN
    You are not overreacting. The longer I live, the more sick I am of people being rude. Courtesy goes a long way in pacifying and satisfying people.
    It is not too much to ask from someone who is shooting up your child. She seems to have been poorly taught.

    When my baby was born, I told them no silver drops in his eyes. I don't have GC, plus, it was a C Section. Darn if they didn't put in those blasted silver drops, violating my written instructions/release of responsibility. I should have sued. So should you.
  9. by   indynurse#2
    I think we all agree that something wrong happened here - the 'nurse' was rude and did not follow basic standards of practice in medication administration - she should be reprimanded about her attitude and given remedial teaching about med administration - yes, I believe OP should follow up on this and make sure it is not just "overlooked" (I worked as a RN in a Peds office, often things do get "overlooked") However - to SUE???? Come on people, our society is very "sue happy" and I think it's getting rediculous. No wonder malpractice is skyrocketing and doctors are getting forced out of the profession - do we really want that to extend to nursing as well? Now if there was intentional harm or GROSS negligence involved causing harm to the patient, it may be different but the fact is, a non-harmful mistake was made (and yes I know, there could have been an allergy etc. but that is not so in this case!) and whether the 'nurse' was rude about it or the most apologetic person in the world, she doesn't deserve to be sued over it, nor does the doctor/NP involved. There are other ways to get the point across that this was not an acceptable standard of practice. There, I'm done ranting
  10. by   CseMgr1
    Quote from hotshot05
    My son is 8 years old. He had a well-child check up Friday. NP said he's due for varrivax booster and they also recommend Hep A. I had never heard of Hep A for kids. She said that it's not a new vaccination, but they've only been giving it to kids for about a month. Ok, I'll think about it. She says thats fine, she'll give me the paper work.
    In walks nurse/med assistant (not sure title). She's giong to do finger poke and what I think is varivax. She was very rude from the very beginning of the appointment. Anyhow, she just grabs his finger and pokes, doesnt even give a chance to explain this to my son are ask him if he's ready. Poke! Just does it. I know he's 8 and won't say he ready, but come on a little warning would have been nice for both of us. Then she asks him where he wants his shot. "Will you hold still like a big boy and take it in the arm like the big boys do, or do we have to use your leg like the babies" I interrupted her and said that the leg would be better because the muscle is bigger and it won't be as tender afterward. So I get him ready and as I'm distracting him she pops in the shot, again no warning to either one of us. I did not see her give the shot, but then I see her put 2 bandaids on, one on each leg. Ok, whats going on. I ask her to give me a copy of what she just gave him. Sure as heck, she gave him the Hep A also. I brought this to her attention and she says, well she wrote for me to give both, I gave you the sheets, and there's really no harm. Sorry. Then walks away. I told the receptionist Sorry just isnt' good enough. I then talk to the NP who says she did not order for the Hep A only the varrivax, but that on the education she circled both varrivax and Hep A so I could look at the info. The person who gave the shot comes back over and says, well I can't take it back, and it's actually a good thing.
    Yes, maybe this is a little mistake and no harm was done. But she didn't even own her mistake. She wouldn't have told anyone if I wouldn't have brought it up. I was told to call the office manager on Monday to speak to them. All I want is just an acknowledgement that it was a mistake. This lady was in a big rush since the beginning of his appt. And quite rude for being in peds office. What if it would have been something else.
    I am not overreacting, am I? Now, he has a huge (larger than 50 cent piece red swollen area that is slightly warm on one leg. I don't even know which one went into which leg. I'm sure thats normal.
    Thanks for listening to my vent.
    Nope, you're not. Maybe your local BON needs to get involved...at least to find out why she is behaving so unprofessionally in not accepting accountability for the fact that she committed a med error...which sounds like a violation of the Standards of Practice of the Nurse Practice Act.
  11. by   OB_or_NICU_hopeful
    hotshot05 ~ I see you lurking a lot, but no updates.....what did they say at your meeting?
  12. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from CseMgr1
    Nope, you're not. Maybe your local BON needs to get involved...at least to find out why she is behaving so unprofessionally in not accepting accountability for the fact that she committed a med error...which sounds like a violation of the Standards of Practice of the Nurse Practice Act.
    Report someone to the BON for a med error or for being rude? Come on! If she was an MA posing as a nurse, yes, that should be reported, because it's a violation. Every quarter I get a newsletter from the BON listing disciplinary actions, including those taken against people misrepresenting themselves as nurses.
  13. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from OB_or_NICU_hopeful
    hotshot05 ~ I see you lurking a lot, but no updates.....what did they say at your meeting?
    I suppose when she has something new to report, she will. No need to tell everyone she's "lurking."

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