On-call or cancelled? That is the question! - page 3

Hello: What is the cancellation/on-call policy at your facility? Last week, my facility instituted a new/updated on-call/cancellation policy. Basically, nurses are no longer cancelled, they are... Read More

  1. by   kevler
    1) do you have a union?
    2) once a called is the shift considered OT?
  2. by   BirdieRN
    I find it interesting that no one brought Staffing up in this discussion. Most of the facilities have done this to be fiscally responsible & and to provide safe Staffing. Safety is hugely important especially for the night shift. At a previous facility the scheduling and Staffing committee actually had the staff vote on night shift standby hours. The 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. night shift staff would not be called in after 1 a.m. per their votes which meant the night shift staff would have to deal with any change in Acuity or census. The cost when ended leveling out with some overtime as opposed to calling someone in.
    Granted no one ever wanted to call someone in with just two hours left of their shift unless it was an emergency.
    What Staffing policy would you want to implement to ensure that staff was available when needed to support stay safe Staffing?
  3. by   gettingbsn2msn
    This is called push back. I believe some woman wrote a book on it. Corporate will push as far as they can. It's like the frog in the pot thought. The hope is that one becomes used to it and it becomes the new norm. After that a new push is put in place. I saw this 10 years ago in Georgia. I was a night nurse. We were not called off but if not needed at 7 pm we would be on call until 11 pm. This was with zero pay for 4 hours. Nurses complained but eventually they complied. This seems to be the next push. May I ask if this is happening in a southeast state. Conditions are the worst down here, especially in the smaller towns and rural areas.
  4. by   JKL33
    Quote from BirdieRN
    I find it interesting that no one brought Staffing up in this discussion. Most of the facilities have done this to be fiscally responsible & and to provide safe Staffing. Safety is hugely important especially for the night shift. At a previous facility the scheduling and Staffing committee actually had the staff vote on night shift standby hours. The 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. night shift staff would not be called in after 1 a.m. per their votes which meant the night shift staff would have to deal with any change in Acuity or census. The cost when ended leveling out with some overtime as opposed to calling someone in.
    Granted no one ever wanted to call someone in with just two hours left of their shift unless it was an emergency.
    What Staffing policy would you want to implement to ensure that staff was available when needed to support stay safe Staffing?
    What I would NOT do is steal from employees.

    Let me put this into perspective. I've been around long enough to remember a time when it was 100% acceptable to take an acetaminophen tablet from the employer's stock for personal use. Although I never needed to use this option, sometimes people did and it generally wasn't abused. From the employer's POV it helped the employee and enabled them to continue working.

    Business practices have changed. It is well-known now that it is not the employer's responsibility to provide things like this for the employee. If one were to take a $.02 tablet from the employer, they would be stealing. Any of us who experienced this change in trends has heard this line repeatedly.

    Now, please tell me how hiring someone at X dollars per hour to work X hours per week, and then, when it suits you, demanding that - as a condition of their continued employment - they sit at home at your beck and call for ZERO dollars (or a pittance, same difference) is not stealing. The market cost of "retaining" a skilled professional is not being paid. It's not even being acknowledged!

    There is NO attempt to be ethical with this practice. Fair compensation is not offered - I mean, wouldn't the employer also save money by paying only 60% or 50% of the usual wage? Although those figures still don't represent the terms under which the employee was hired, they are certainly more fair. I've also never heard of the employer providing a statement of financial donation to the employee who donates 4, 8, 12 hours' worth of time. Again, that doesn't really cover it, but it would at least be an acknowledgment and a gesture of integrity.

    Instead, what they are doing is taking 50% of the employment agreement and using it to their advantage: "You're on the schedule for this shift, we can tell you to stay home if we want to." FINE!!! The other 50% of that is that if you're going to say I'm on the schedule, that means you intended to pay me what we agreed upon, or you can take me off the schedule. You can't have it both ways.

    It's really pretty simple.
  5. by   dream'n
    I just got home from night shift and my brain might be tired, but can anyone else think of a professional career that routinely cancels/on calls their regular scheduled employees to save money? I know Dr's are on call at times, but they are salaried. I honestly can't think of any other profession (except commission jobs) where employees can't trust that they will receive a full paycheck without having to use their PTO time.
  6. by   morelostthanfound
    Quote from JKL33
    What I would NOT do is steal from employees.

    Let me put this into perspective. I've been around long enough to remember a time when it was 100% acceptable to take an acetaminophen tablet from the employer's stock for personal use. Although I never needed to use this option, sometimes people did and it generally wasn't abused. From the employer's POV it helped the employee and enabled them to continue working.

    Business practices have changed. It is well-known now that it is not the employer's responsibility to provide things like this for the employee. If one were to take a $.02 tablet from the employer, they would be stealing. Any of us who experienced this change in trends has heard this line repeatedly.

    Now, please tell me how hiring someone at X dollars per hour to work X hours per week, and then, when it suits you, demanding that - as a condition of their continued employment - they sit at home at your beck and call for ZERO dollars (or a pittance, same difference) is not stealing. The market cost of "retaining" a skilled professional is not being paid. It's not even being acknowledged!

    There is NO attempt to be ethical with this practice. Fair compensation is not offered - I mean, wouldn't the employer also save money by paying only 60% or 50% of the usual wage? Although those figures still don't represent the terms under which the employee was hired, they are certainly more fair. I've also never heard of the employer providing a statement of financial donation to the employee who donates 4, 8, 12 hours' worth of time. Again, that doesn't really cover it, but it would at least be an acknowledgment and a gesture of integrity.

    Instead, what they are doing is taking 50% of the employment agreement and using it to their advantage: "You're on the schedule for this shift, we can tell you to stay home if we want to." FINE!!! The other 50% of that is that if you're going to say I'm on the schedule, that means you intended to pay me what we agreed upon, or you can take me off the schedule. You can't have it both ways.

    It's really pretty simple.
    I absolutely agree with the 'frog and the pot' analogy. This practice is stealing, unethical, and just another insult to all of the dedicated caregivers that are the true lifeblood of any hospital. As JKL33 pointed out, this practice, in effect 'deprofessionalizes' nursing-when was the last time you recall hearing of any professional not being fairly compensated for their time? Only when nurses organize or there is a mass, mass exodus and hospital administration loses lots of revenue because they can't adequately staff their beds, will this ever change. Here's an idea, how about trimming the salary or some of the fringe benefits of Mr Hospital CEO or perhaps, getting rid of some of the dead wood at the top?
  7. by   seb1957
    When we are put on call we get $2 or 3/hr and are put on call in 4 hr increments. So 7-11, 11-3, 3-7. If you get called in within that 4 hr period you get time and a half until the end of the 4 hr period then straight time the rest of the shift. You have to call around 10 to see if they will need you at 11 or not. It used to be that if you got called in it was time and a half for the whole shift and there were no 4 hr increments. The CNA's are quitting because they're getting put on call or cancelled twice a pay period lately. They can't pay their bills.

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