Nursing: Then and Now - pg.5 | allnurses

Nursing: Then and Now - page 5

Looking back to when I was in nursing school, and then starting my nursing career, I remember many things that are no longer in use, or things that have transformed over the years. Gone are the days... Read More

  1. Visit  DidiRN profile page
    10
    One thing I remember and see a huge difference now is when I started back in the mid 1980s, is how patients and families had a lot more trust and respect for you.
    Junebug903, ladyklurker, ggfifirn, and 7 others like this.
  2. Visit  brandy1017 profile page
    1
    I remember the two day all day affair of nursing boards back in the day! And you only learned if you passed, not how well or poorly you had done. Months would go by while you were working and waiting and if you failed you could lose your job or at least be demoted till you passed. Talk about pressure! I passed but a couple coworkers didn't, one lost her job and had to go to a different hospital, the other worked as a HUC/CNA till boards were passed.
    tnbutterfly likes this.
  3. Visit  jrbl77 profile page
    3
    Very interesting posts. We did peritoneal dialysis on our floor back in the 70's. MD would come and put a temporary cath in place in the "treatment room" and then we would hang the large glass bottles. Usually we did the PD in a semi private room. The caths would usually leak after a short time. I remember drawing up chemo in the med room, just like any other med. All our TURP pts got IM tobramycin every 8 hrs. The worst was probably the cataract pts, they had to get eye drops every 5 mins prior to surgery, yes as an in pt. They would come back from surgery in the bed. A RN would need to go get them from the OR. Often the wheels of the bed would get stuck in the crack in the elevator, alot of lifting involved. They stayed in the hospital for a week, had to be fed and the male pt's shaved, sand bags at the head. Now it is done in 20 mins and out the door you go. I learned many things as a new nurse and one of the things I remember most " do things the right way" My 1st head nurse was a stickler on this. Just to add a comment on the earlier post about calling the pt Mr or Miss etc due to the age difference. Now days as a 56 yr old RN, I'm often older than my pts. I usually ask what the pt wants to be called and 99% respond with their first name.
  4. Visit  phoffman profile page
    3
    I remember having a brown glass bottle of whiskey in the med closet to give a Doctor ordered measured dose (in a med cup)
    We mixed chemo IV's at the start of shift.
    We also added yellow vitamin to IV (I loved the smell, so my co-workers would save those for me)
    My grandfather had pernicious anemia and needed a vitamin B shot 1x/month. As a student nurse I gave it to him in my aunt's (nurse) absence. The syringe was glass and the needle needed to be sharpened!
  5. Visit  Psychtrish39 profile page
    2
    @Do good.. I went to school in the early 2000s and we learned gravity drips as well. You are right all nurses should know how and I am glad that I do so if in a natural disaster or no pumps.. I can do it "old school" and I am darn proud I am old school and new school both.. Love this post.... love hearing how nursing has changed...
  6. Visit  NutmeggeRN profile page
    2
    Dont think I saw this but patients were admitted the night BEFORE surgery!!!!!!
    Teacup Pom and tnbutterfly like this.
  7. Visit  RockinChick66 profile page
    2
    I'm not old enough to remember this but my charge nurse told me that before Lovenox or Heparin, pts use to "drop like flies"They'd get up to walk with P/T and get back to bed only to throw a PE. .
  8. Visit  tnbutterfly profile page
    2
    Post op patients did not ambulate as soon and as often as they do now.
  9. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    3
    Quote from Good Morning, Gil
    My question is: how did nurses have time to smoke back in the day? lol

    I always call patients Mr or Miss ______ unless they prefer something else or are my age or younger. I'm in my 20's; is this not standard practice? I think it's rude to call someone 50 years older than me by his/her first name.
    Oh there was time to smoke, go to the powder room, go to have your meals (in the cafeteria for days and perhaps evenings), take breaks, have a quick convo with one's bf, hubby or fianc (then as now many nurses were dating or involved with a member of staff or someone who had regular business at the hospital such as LE ), and so forth.

    Depending upon your unit there could be a decent census of stable patients whom today would be discharged home or to LTC. So aside from meds, treatments and what not there really wasn't *that* much else to do. Even for many CC patients treatments/interventions may have been limited compared to the options today.

    With team nursing it also was (again depending upon the unit and staffing) sometimes easy to sneak off for a break or what not. That is until your head nurse sniffed you out.

    Finally there was end of shift charting. If not the nurse's station then the lounge or anyplace else one could find room and smoking was allowed.
  10. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    1
    Quote from tnbutterfly
    Post op patients did not ambulate as soon and as often as they do now.
    Neither often did new moms.
    tnbutterfly likes this.
  11. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    1
    Quote from nhnursie
    Dont think I saw this but patients were admitted the night BEFORE surgery!!!!!!
    Patients were often admitted night or even a day or several before scheduled surgery or procedure. Much depended upon what sort of tests/lab work the MD wanted run beforehand, or required prep.

    So many things are done today on an outpatient basis and or much of the prep done at home before patient arrives that "youngsters" forget there was a time that didn't happen. A two or even three day bowel prep for a colonoscopy was done inpatient. You'd find those soda pop looking green bottles of magnesium citrate in many fridges on the floor, but getting patients to drink them all down was another matter cause it most certainly did not taste like pop. *LOL*

    Depending upon what tests or whatnot were ordered the physican or physicans may wish to see the results early enough before the night before.
    tnbutterfly likes this.
  12. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    1
    Quote from Good Morning, Gil
    My question is: how did nurses have time to smoke back in the day? lol

    I always call patients Mr or Miss ______ unless they prefer something else or are my age or younger. I'm in my 20's; is this not standard practice? I think it's rude to call someone 50 years older than me by his/her first name.
    Welcome to the new world of assumed informality.

    Telephone your credit card's customer service department and the rep named "Bob" (even though they are most often in India ) acts like he has known you for ages and begins addressing you by your Christian name. Go to a restaurant and your waiter is now also your close friend and upon seeing your name on the credit card begins calling you again by your Christian name.

    Back in the old days it was "Nurse Rogers" or "Miss. Kent", or "Doctor Jones". Patients were Mr, Miss. or Mrs, unless some other honorific such as "Father", or whatnot applied.
    tnbutterfly likes this.
  13. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    2
    Quote from phoffman
    I remember having a brown glass bottle of whiskey in the med closet to give a Doctor ordered measured dose (in a med cup)
    We mixed chemo IV's at the start of shift.
    We also added yellow vitamin to IV (I loved the smell, so my co-workers would save those for me)
    My grandfather had pernicious anemia and needed a vitamin B shot 1x/month. As a student nurse I gave it to him in my aunt's (nurse) absence. The syringe was glass and the needle needed to be sharpened!
    Ahh Vitamin B, the essential ingredient for making a nurse's best IV friend the "banana bag". Slap some tape on the thing and you've got a system nearly if not equally as accurate for most gravity infusions as today's pumps.
    NRSKarenRN and tnbutterfly like this.

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