Nurses Who Have Killed - page 8

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

23,881 Views | 83 Comments

Some people would say that the very mention of murderous nurses is unbecoming on a professional nursing forum. In fact, others would say that that this subject is downright distasteful and generates negative attention. However,... Read More


  1. 0
    I remember many years ago watching a court TV program. A" prison" nurse was accused of killing her husband with a drug overdose of insulin. I remember thinking that maybe he had just accidently given himself too much insulin. However, I changed my mind real quick when I learned that her husband was not even a diabetic!!!!
  2. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I've also heard that Washington state has many depressed people and the highest suicide rate of all the states in the union. Perhaps the incessant rainfall, gray skies and lack of sunshine affects peoples' mental health negatively. Who knows.
    Not true!
    1 Alaska
    2Nevada
    3 New Mexico

    Its states with large proportions of Native Americans.
  3. 0
    crazy
  4. 0
    Quote from unreal
    Orville Lynn Majors-former Licensed Practical Nurse in Indiana convicted of murdering six patients. He was suspected of as many as 130 patient murders between 1993 and 1995.
    I was just a teenager when this all came out but given that I live in Indiana, it was BIG news. Definitely not something easy to forget.
  5. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I've also heard that Washington state has many depressed people and the highest suicide rate of all the states in the union. Perhaps the incessant rainfall, gray skies and lack of sunshine affects peoples' mental health negatively. Who knows.
    I had a coworker who once lived in Seattle. He moved to Las Vegas because his wife has seasonal affective disorder, which causes her to become extremely depressed with prolonged cloudy, rainy periods like those in the Pacific Northwest.
  6. 0
    Quote from CloudySue
    Our local newspaper has an archive of all the stories they've published about Charles Cullen:

    <b>STORY ARCHIVE:</b> Charles Cullen Case - mcall.com

    And this is a link to a Nov. 29 article about settlements from one local hospital:

    St. Luke's settles five cases involving serial killer nurse - mcall.com
    I read "The Good Nurse," a book written about Cullen by a former med student. It was well-written. It made me mad that all those hospitals turned a blind eye.

    Gary Heidnik was a serial killer in Philly. He lured women into his home, killed them, cut them up and stored them in his freezers. He was an LPN. I remember the PA BON newsletter that listed his license revocation.
  7. 1
    Quote from OCNRN63
    I read "The Good Nurse," a book written about Cullen by a former med student. It was well-written. It made me mad that all those hospitals turned a blind eye.

    Gary Heidnik was a serial killer in Philly. He lured women into his home, killed them, cut them up and stored them in his freezers. He was an LPN. I remember the PA BON newsletter that listed his license revocation.
    Wow, I've read about Heidnik but somehow missed the part about him being a nurse.
    His crimes were horrendous.

    If you google female serial killers, it's amazing how many were "nurses" (some were aides but called "nurses", I'm sure).

    Virginia Jaspers creeped me out... Google her picture... she looks so mean.
    DeLanaHarvickWannabe likes this.
  8. 0
    What about Joy Woomer? She was convicted of killing a child as a homecare nurse but the case against her was very weak. I think the biggest mistake her defense team made was trying to pin it on the parents instead of simply maintaining her own innocence.
  9. 0
    I think it's important to make a distinction between killers who happened to be nurses (Andrea Yates) and nurses who kill 'in the line of duty' (Orville Majors). The 'line of duty' killers are much, much scarier in my opinion, because they use their position of trust as a weapon- whereas (for the most part) the 'happened to be nurses' killers are of a substantially lesser threat to the general public, as their crimes tend to be domestic in nature.

    The victims are no less dead, just pointing out a difference in the two types.

    You can read case information on several of these at Websleuths Crime Sleuthing Community .
  10. 1
    Quote from Jeanette73
    What about Joy Woomer? She was convicted of killing a child as a homecare nurse but the case against her was very weak. I think the biggest mistake her defense team made was trying to pin it on the parents instead of simply maintaining her own innocence.
    That case is still up for debate.
    morte likes this.


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