Nurses not responding fast enough-VENT - page 2

This is truly a VENT. A VENT about my own family-specifically my AUNT. It all started last week when my aunt said she would have to spend the night with my grandma(her mom) because the nurses... Read More

  1. by   Simplepleasures
    Why not have a reality type show in which a nurse is followed on a med surg unit, especially in a crummy hospital that is known for understaffing. Or maybe those hospital/ doctor/ nurse dramas could feature a story of the day in the life of an overworked nurse, show the greedy hospital owners cutting the budget and chuckling while counting their yearly profits, pan back to the med surg unit and the frazzeled nurses running amok......
  2. by   TheCommuter
    I don't really care if I come across as rude to my patients these days. I'll tell them the truth, and sometimes the truth hurts.

    Every time a patient complains that they had to wait 10 minutes for their call light to be answered, I'll respond rather honestly, "There are 30 patients on this unit, with only 1 aide to answer call lights. I would have answered your call light sooner if that was possible, but I was assisting another patient." This lets them know that they are not the only patient to be catered to.
  3. by   GadgetRN71
    Quote from ingelein
    Why not have a reality type show in which a nurse is followed on a med surg unit, especially in a crummy hospital that is known for understaffing. Or maybe those hospital/ doctor/ nurse dramas could feature a story of the day in the life of an overworked nurse, show the greedy hospital owners cutting the budget and chuckling while counting their yearly profits, pan back to the med surg unit and the frazzeled nurses running amok......
    I love this idea but the HIPAA people wouldn't go for it(the reality show) and I bet the other show(the drama) wouldn't do well in the ratings because people don't want to know what's really going on. Far easier to blame everything on nurses.:angryfire
  4. by   CrunchRN
    I have to tell you bedside nurses that I truly admire your fortitude. You all are amazing to me. I wish someone would educate the patients to the real situation, and the hospitals that try to muzzle you from speaking the truth or give you scripts to read make me sick.

    Sorry for that rant, but just wanted you bedside nurses to know you are admired greatly!
  5. by   EmmaG
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I don't really care if I come across as rude to my patients these days. I'll tell them the truth, and sometimes the truth hurts.

    Every time a patient complains that they had to wait 10 minutes for their call light to be answered, I'll respond rather honestly, "There are 30 patients on this unit, with only 1 aide to answer call lights. I would have answered your call light sooner if that was possible, but I was assisting another patient." This lets them know that they are not the only patient to be catered to.
    If a patient asks how many people I'm caring for, I'll answer honestly. You'd be surprised how many are truly taken aback that they're not my only patient :stone
  6. by   marie-francoise
    But hospitals just keep up this charade - worse, they encourage it. They promote this image of their hospital as a Ritz Carlton, not somewhere you go to get a medical problem managed and stabilized.

    I attended a nauseating in-service about how the nurses had to repeat the word "excellent" when talking to a "customer" (i.e., the patient), as in, "I hope you received EXCELLENT care", and to repeat that word like a mantra.

    I think the public, including patients and their families, should be made aware about the nursing shortage and its attendant problems. Especially what they should be expecting when they are in the hospital, so that they are unblinkered.

    It seems we need to strike a balance between professionalism in which we try to look like the "duck looking serene above water, but paddling like hell below" and professionalism in which we make it very clear that there are just not enough nurses to go around.

    Otherwise, this bedside nursing shortage is just gonna get worse and worse and worse, until in a few years we'll just have new, scared, stressed-out (and short-lived at the bedside) grads + imported nurses attending the bedside of our parents and grandparents.

    Anyway, just my prophecy. To solve ANY problem, one must be TRUTHFUL about it. Otherwise, a charade is kept up, and there is no incentive for finding a solution.

    P.S. I love that show "House" - love the main actor, love the other actors, love the dialogue, love the diagnosis aspect of it; but...... where are the nurses? I mean, just show a couple every now and then (at least)....
    Last edit by marie-francoise on Dec 14, '07 : Reason: added text
  7. by   Blee O'Myacin
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    If a patient asks how many people I'm caring for, I'll answer honestly. You'd be surprised how many are truly taken aback that they're not my only patient :stone
    LOL -I always answer that question when asked. Especially when I have three charts in my hand making the rounds to discharge patients, and that "lovely" family which just leaves the call light on needs me to go fishing in Grandma's blankets for her bracelet, hearing aid or cell phone! (Umm - first off, ew. Do it yourself. Second of all, do I look like I have a free hand at the moment?? I must be heading straight to the supply closet for my 1400 roundevous with our hospital's Mr. McSteamy - who is young enough to be my... *much younger brother*...LOL)

    Blee
  8. by   EmmaG
    I believe most patients are aware at some level of the nursing shortage. Even if they aren't, it's not their problem. They are there for nursing care, and it's up to the hospital to provide it. The patient is understandably and justifiably self-centered (and no, I'm not talking about those who scream for coffee during a code). Burdening the patients, who already have enough issues to deal with, isn't the answer. In my experience, it is also counter-productive for the nurse, as a patient who feels insecure and unsafe is going to be far more difficult to care for than someone who believes (whether it's reality or not) that there are calm, competent staff in adequate numbers to care for them. At their baseline, most tend to be suspicious and watchful of everything we do (no thanks to the media reporting tens of thousands of errors and deaths in hospitals); I'm certainly not going to compound that by telling them, "Oh by the way, we are understaffed."
  9. by   Blee O'Myacin
    Quote from marie-francoise
    But hospitals just keep up this charade - worse, they encourage it. They promote this image of their hospital as a Ritz Carlton, not somewhere you go to get a medical problem managed and stabilized.

    I attended a nauseating in-service about how the nurses had to repeat the word "excellent" when talking to a "customer" (i.e., the patient), as in, "I hope you received EXCELLENT care", and to repeat that word like a mantra.

    I think the public, including patients and their families, should be made aware about the nursing shortage and its attendant problems. Especially what they should be expecting when they are in the hospital, so that they are unblinkered.

    It seems we need to strike a balance between professionalism in which we try to look like the "duck looking serene above water, but paddling like hell below" and professionalism in which we make it very clear that there are just not enough nurses to go around.

    Otherwise, this bedside nursing shortage is just gonna get worse and worse and worse, until in a few years we'll just have new, scared, stressed-out (and short-lived at the bedside) grads + imported nurses attending the bedside of our parents and grandparents.

    Anyway, just my prophecy. To solve ANY problem, one must be TRUTHFUL about it. Otherwise, a charade is kept up, and there is no incentive for finding a solution.

    P.S. I love that show "House" - love the main actor, love the other actors, love the dialogue, love the diagnosis aspect of it; but...... where are the nurses? I mean, just show a couple every now and then (at least)....

    Hello, here is your *excellent* K-exelate along with your *excellent* bedside commode. We strive for 5, so please be sure to remember this *excellent* experience when filling out your press gainey!!

    Blee
  10. by   Ms Kylee
    Yep, I canoodle in the linen closet a lot. I sit on my butt and eat bon bons too. No TV at the nurse's station, so I have to listen to the radio spitting out never ending and nauseating Christmas songs. And the best part... I get paid the big bucks to do all this and eat ice cream too.

    REALITY CHECK... None of the above happens... Most of the time I'm trying to juggle 17 diaper changes, vitals, blood sugars, bed changes, and God only knows what else. When I get hit with the "You didn't come fast enough" baloney. I just smile and say "I'm truly sorry, but I had another patient that needed my help. But I'm here now. What can I do for you?" That usually backs them off.
  11. by   EmmaG
    Quote from Blee O'Myacin
    Hello, here is your *excellent* K-exelate along with your *excellent* bedside commode. We strive for 5, so please be sure to remember this *excellent* experience when filling out your press gainey!!

    Blee
    I saw a sign in a patient's room the other day--- it said "Very good isn't good enough! We will provide you with EXCELLENT care!" (emphasis theirs)

    Only one I've seen; I suspect the others had already been torn down
  12. by   Chaya
    I don't blame my patients for buying into the image Admin wants to project but I refuse to support it. I am usually able to tell them I'll send the next available helper in, or grab something quick for them, or tell them to see if they can find the item and I'll help when I'm able...then there was this loo the other nite who rang asking for her WAITRESS to take away her nebulizer...don't know if she was confused but REALLY rubbed me the wrong way!
  13. by   EmmaG
    Quote from Chaya
    I don't blame my patients for buying into the image Admin wants to project but I refuse to support it. I am usually able to tell them I'll send the next available helper in, or grab something quick for them, or tell them to see if they can find the item and I'll help when I'm able...then there was this loo the other nite who rang asking for her WAITRESS to take away her nebulizer...don't know if she was confused but REALLY rubbed me the wrong way!
    I worked with a male nurse who was at times referred to as the 'bellhop' --- never let him live that one down

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