Noise level at night - page 3

Hello everyone! I wanted to get some opinions and suggestions about reducing noise levels during the night shift. What are the main sources of noise for your unit/floor? Was there a program/education put in place to reduce... Read More

  1. 1
    Quote from IdislikeCODEbrowns
    Sorry to offend anyone but my beef w/ this whole issue is that I am seeing more and more pts who pick and choose when they want to be treated like pts and when they want to be 'paying customers who feel its ok to be waited on 24/7, I understand controlling noise level around others, nights or not, but its a slippery slope when people start forgetting what a hospital's are for (to get better) not to have a jug of ice water 3/4 filled w/ ice and the rest water and heaven forbid that there's too much ice... Or what about those pts who insist on staff putting signs on their doors saying 'do not interrupt between 11pm and 7am' really,this is a ******* hospital and you'll probably be the pt who turns around and sues bc your potassium level was 2.5 and had an arrhythmia but was refusing to get labs rechecked at 4am...hospitals aren't hotels bottom line, it's not pleasant and you shouldn't like being there more than your own home
    Exactly!!
    SNB1014 likes this.

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  2. 1
    Quote from IdislikeCODEbrowns
    Sorry to offend anyone but my beef w/ this whole issue is that I am seeing more and more pts who pick and choose when they want to be treated like pts and when they want to be 'paying customers who feel its ok to be waited on 24/7, I understand controlling noise level around others, nights or not, but its a slippery slope when people start forgetting what a hospital's are for (to get better) not to have a jug of ice water 3/4 filled w/ ice and the rest water and heaven forbid that there's too much ice... Or what about those pts who insist on staff putting signs on their doors saying 'do not interrupt between 11pm and 7am' really,this is a ******* hospital and you'll probably be the pt who turns around and sues bc your potassium level was 2.5 and had an arrhythmia but was refusing to get labs rechecked at 4am...hospitals aren't hotels bottom line, it's not pleasant and you shouldn't like being there more than your own home
    Oh, I hate that customer service as much as anyone else. But I think there's a difference between customer service and good patient care, at least in intent and purpose even when it might seem like the same ends. Allowing the patient to sleep as much as possible given their condition allows (and if they're on Q1hr anything obviously that's going to be basically no sleep) is much different to me than all that pillow fluffing satisfaction survey nonsense. I make sure they have water when they ask because hydration is important. I find them an extra pillow because I want them to be as comfortable as our hospital beds allow. I do my best to be conscientious about noise at night because sleep is healing. If patients feel like they got good "customer service" as a side effect, well, so be it, but these types of things fall under good patient care for me.

    As to the customer service BS, I refuse to use scripted language. If a family member has a complaint I am happy to address it but if something critical is going on with another patient it will absolutely have to wait. If a patient wants to refuse labs or NOC vitals, they will get educated on how and why that is detrimental to their health. If a parent refuses to keep crib rails up and then wants to know if it's still my fault if their baby falls out of the crib, I make sure they know that THEY are responsible for their child's safety when they are at the bedside.
    ContraryRock likes this.
  3. 0
    And I'd just like to add that prior to moving to med surg, I worked in the ER, so am QUITE well-versed on entitled patients with unreasonable expectations who think they're getting a table at Chili's and not a bed in a busy hospital with other sick folk who might just be more close to dying at any particular moment than they are. I still think being mindful of noise levels at night is important.
  4. 3
    Quote from IdislikeCODEbrowns
    Sorry to offend anyone but my beef w/ this whole issue is that I am seeing more and more pts who pick and choose when they want to be treated like pts and when they want to be 'paying customers who feel its ok to be waited on 24/7, I understand controlling noise level around others, nights or not, but its a slippery slope when people start forgetting what a hospital's are for (to get better) not to have a jug of ice water 3/4 filled w/ ice and the rest water and heaven forbid that there's too much ice... Or what about those pts who insist on staff putting signs on their doors saying 'do not interrupt between 11pm and 7am' really,this is a ******* hospital and you'll probably be the pt who turns around and sues bc your potassium level was 2.5 and had an arrhythmia but was refusing to get labs rechecked at 4am...hospitals aren't hotels bottom line, it's not pleasant and you shouldn't like being there more than your own home
    Have you, or your family member, ever stayed in the hospital as a patient? I stayed in the hospital for about 2 weeks a couple of years ago. It was the worst place for me to get rest because my vital signs were being checked Q4H, in addition to being woken up for medications, blood work, etc. I understood that those things were medically necessary for my well-being. You standing outside of my room at the nurses' station carrying on in a loud voice and laughing loudly isn't medically necessary for me to heal.

    It's one thing to break your back for patients because of the push towards treating them as "customers", but I learned when I was about five years-old to talk with an "inside voice" and what it means to be respectful of people around me (including those who are sleeping). That's common courtesy. There's a big difference.
    B in the USA, Aurora77, and SC_RNDude like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from hiddencatRN

    Oh, I hate that customer service as much as anyone else. But I think there's a difference between customer service and good patient care, at least in intent and purpose even when it might seem like the same ends. Allowing the patient to sleep as much as possible given their condition allows (and if they're on Q1hr anything obviously that's going to be basically no sleep) is much different to me than all that pillow fluffing satisfaction survey nonsense. I make sure they have water when they ask because hydration is important. I find them an extra pillow because I want them to be as comfortable as our hospital beds allow. I do my best to be conscientious about noise at night because sleep is healing. If patients feel like they got good "customer service" as a side effect, well, so be it, but these types of things fall under good patient care for me.

    As to the customer service BS, I refuse to use scripted language. If a family member has a complaint I am happy to address it but if something critical is going on with another patient it will absolutely have to wait. If a patient wants to refuse labs or NOC vitals, they will get educated on how and why that is detrimental to their health. If a parent refuses to keep crib rails up and then wants to know if it's still my fault if their baby falls out of the crib, I make sure they know that THEY are responsible for their child's safety when they are at the bedside.
    ^Well said!
  6. 0
    Quote from Calabria

    Have you, or your family member, ever stayed in the hospital as a patient? I stayed in the hospital for about 2 weeks a couple of years ago. It was the worst place for me to get rest because my vital signs were being checked Q4H, in addition to being woken up for medications, blood work, etc. I understood that those things were medically necessary for my well-being. You standing outside of my room at the nurses' station carrying on in a loud voice and laughing loudly isn't medically necessary for me to heal.

    It's one thing to break your back for patients because of the push towards treating them as "customers", but I learned when I was about five years-old to talk with an "inside voice" and what it means to be respectful of people around me (including those who are sleeping). That's common courtesy. There's a big difference.
    ^agreed!!

    I was a CC pt about 5 years ago. I got the best sleep because there were mindful of noises. I was near the nurses station, and I did not hear a thing; even as I got better, the atmosphere was pretty quiet, even at night.
  7. 0
    I think the way we view this thread is directly related to the way we've been treated over the last several days.
    My interactions with the "customer", have been brutal this week.
    I'm leaning towards the idislikeCODEbrowns way of thinking.
    I suspect he/she has had an equally unpleasant week with unpleasant pts.
  8. 1
    Quote from lilaclover6984
    Yes this!!!
    I'm sure I'm guilty of laughing a little too loudly on my night shifts. But guess what? I'm also the nurse that stays fully awake an alert my whole shift at all times. A few of my coworkers that are always quiet and respectful on nights are also the ones with their heads on the desk with eyes closed and all disoriented when something happens. If I were a pt I'd take the louder alert nurse anyday.
    Maybe so. But when the patient answers thier HCHPS survey, they are likley remembering the louder nurse in a negative way, and at the same time assuming that all the nurses were awake and alert.
    JDZ344 likes this.
  9. 2
    Quote from SC_RNDude
    and at the same time assuming that all the nurses were awake and alert.
    IDK. I get asked a lot where we sleep during the shift and get surprised looks when I tell patients we are awake all night.
    dirtyhippiegirl and Sun0408 like this.
  10. 2
    Quote from SC_RNDude

    Maybe so. But when the patient answers thier HCHPS survey, they are likley remembering the louder nurse in a negative way, and at the same time assuming that all the nurses were awake and alert.
    I work in Canada and we don't have such surveys
    noyesno and SNB1014 like this.


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